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HARVARD UNIVERSITY 



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LIBRARY 



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Museum of Comparative Zoology 



MAR 12 1921 




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VOL. IX. 



APRIL, 1916 



the- object of this magazine" is 

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Igahe Producing Country in the World 



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SETTER POINTING QUAIL IN A TREE 






PUBLISHED BY 



THE" GAME 1 CONSERVATION SOCIETY, Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.S.A tT.fi }>*v,; -/s 



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REMINGTON 
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Ur YERSITY 




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THE GAME BREEDER 




Write for a Copy 
of This Book 



EVERY sportsman should have a copy pleasant for many reasons. The demand for birds, 

c n r>, ,-, r r>_£*„„J both from city markets and from those who wish to 

of Game Farming for Front and raise game> j/ much greater than the supply> There 

Pleasure. ' If you are a lover of the j s a i so a continuous call for eggs by breeders. 

woods and fields and the wild game that Furthermore the birds you raise will afford you 

inhabits them you will find this book of in- good sport in hunting, aud also food for your table. 

tense interest and undoubted value. It is - If y° u - own ^acreage, T™ «?ay lease the pnvi- 



sent free to those who write for it. 

"Game Farming for Profit and Pleasure" is a 
carefully edited and profusely Illustrated manual on 
the breeding of game birds. It describes in detail 
the habits, foods and enemies of wild turkeys, pheas- 
ants, grouse, quail, wild ducks, and related species. 
It tells of the best methods for rearing. It discusses 
the questions of marketing and hunting. 

The breeding of game birds is profitable and 



lege of shooting over your land to those who will 
gladly pay for it. 

If you cannot raise game yourself we will try to 
put you in touch with those who will raise it for 
you to shoot. The more game raised, the more 
good hunting there will be for you and the more 
often you will enjoy game on your table. 

But the book tells the whole story. You will 
find it most interesting reading. Write for your 
copy today. Use the coupon below. 




Game Breeding Department, Room 203 

HEHCULBS POWDER CO. 

Wilmington, Delaware 



Manufacturers of Explosives; Infallible and 



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Gentlemen: — Please send me a copy of Game Farming for Profit and 
Pleasure. I am interested in game breeding from the standpoint of 



Name. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

A Practical Book on the Breeding of Wild Fowl 
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Contains chapters on the Preservation of Snipe and Woodcock. 

Many readers of the Game Breeder have bred thousands of Wild Ducks 
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DUCK BREEDING IS PROFITABLE. 



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THE GAME BREEDER 



Practice Up Now For The Year's Trophies 

Be among the first out to pepper the speedy clay targets. 
Get an "edge" on the other fellows while the season is still 
young. There's no game in the world that can surpass. 

TRAPSHOOTING 

It's a year 'round sport, brimful of pleasure and recreation. 
The flight of the wily clay discs is an ever present challenge 
to your aim and gun skill and "gun bugs" are the best of 
good fellows. There's a hearty welcome waiting for you at 
the nearest club. 



Get a (o yPDNT ) Hand Trap 



It's great practice for both beginners and experts. Folds 
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the Trapshooting School at the end of Young 's Million Dollar Pier. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field — All Up for Kentucky — Quail in Rhode Island — Angling in 
Ice Bound Streams — Deer in Vermont — Returns from California — Much in a 
Name — Who is the "Moloch " ? — A Hard New Jersey Winter. 

The Silver Fox Ned Dearborn 

Wallace Evans Game Farm - - - *- - - Wallace Evans 

Cat Tales E. H. Forbush 

The Trapshooting School Geo. Frank Lord 

More Lead Poisoning -- Fred. D. Hoyt 

Game Protective Association ------- A. A. Hill 

Amendment to New York Game Law. 

Editorials — Kentucky A More Game State— California — Let Us Breed All Species 

—Why? 

Correspondence — Book Notices — Outings and Innings. 

More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 



To THE GAME BREEDER, 

150 Nassau Street, New York. 

Please send me THE GAME BREEDER, for one year. 

$1.00 enclosed. 

Name 

ot i*e et »••• ...••.««•••;..•« 

City 

State 

N. B.— Write Name and Street Address plainly and state if you 
wish back numbers of the magazine to the first of the year. 



T h< : Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter. July g, 1915, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



VOLUME IX 



APRIL, \9\6 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER J 



All Up For Kentucky. 

Here is a clause in a bill that will 
probably be enacted into a law in Ken- 
tucky before this issue reaches our 
readers : 

"That all game birds and game ani- 
mals reared or bred in captivity shall be 
considered domesticated stock and the 
owners or raisers thereof may keep, sell, 
ship, transport, or otherwise dispose of 
them, and such stock shall not be effected 
or covered by the law prohibiting or reg- 
ulating the killing or disposition of game 
birds or game animals, when the breeders 
or owners thereof have a permit for the 
keeping, selling, shipping, transporting or 
otherwise disposing of them. Such per- 
mits shall be issued by the Game and 
Fish Commission upon application and 
shall be granted where the said birds 
or animals have been lawfully acquired 
and raised. Provided, that the dead 
body or parts thereof of any bird or 
animal, lawfully reared in captivity, may 
be sold when such animal or bird or part 
thereof is marked with a metal tag, said 
tag to be furnished by the Game and 
Fish Commission upon application, and 
no charge shall be made except for ac- 
tual cost of said tag or tags." 

The foregoing seems to reflect the 
genial countenance and ideals of that 
practical game saver, Mr. Talbot, of In- 
diana. 

Quail in Rhode Island. 

There is no living creature save a 
quail that will work all the summer and 
fall for the farmer and then supply him 
with the best of food for his table. And 
all the quail requires is to live in peace 
until he is wanted for food with a lit- 



tle attention when deep snows cover the 
ground in winter. Owing to the recent 
severe weather in Rhode Island, the Fish 
and Game Protective Association have 
made an appeal to the people of the state 
to help feed the birds. The deep snow 
has covered up the food that nature pro- 
vides for them and they have had an 
unusually hard time. The association's 
members are doing all they can to help 
the birds, but have appealed to the peo- 
ple to help them scatter cracked grain 
or other food in the places that the quail 
and other birds have been seen to fre- 
quent. They request the farmers to 
throw the sweepings of their haymows 
or cracked grain on the edges of the 
wood. Bob White is really a hardy lit- 
tle fellow, but there is waste ground 
enough in country localities so he might 
have places of refuge in winter where 
he would be safe and be sure of modest 
rations. 

Angling in Ice Bound Streams. 

Candidly, it looks as if the objections 
by anglers to the ruling of the New 
York Conservation Commission that 
there shall be no fishing for brook trout 
while streams are ice bound, will not 
quite "hold water." In effect they are 
that all trout fishermen know that when 
the streams are filled with "ice and snow 
water, trout will not rise to the bait." 
By the same token, why should any one 
want to angle when "trout will not rise 
to the bait?" The object of the law was 
no doubt to prevent fishing in some rush- 
ing stream that may have cleared itself 
of ice in places before the winter is 
over. It is no great hardship to forbid 
all from doing that which few care to 
do and which no one should care to do. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Deer in Vermont. 

Deer are so plentiful in some parts 
of Vermont that during the recent Wiz- 
ard weather and deep snow there the 
farmers opened their barn doors and 
yards to them and provided them with 
rations of crushed apples. Venison is 
easier and cheaper to produce than beef, 
and it is worth twice as much as beef 
in the New York market. Yet what 
object is there in /producing it when 
there is a law forbidding the farmers 
of Vermont from selling it in the New 
York market? Who would care to rear 
chickens or swine or sheep, or anything 
else on the farm, if it were unlawful to 
sell it? But better times are coming for 
those who want to produce venison and 
for those who want to purchase it. There 
is nothing in the world that so serves 
to make a thing scarce as not to be able 
to sell it, and nothing that tends to 
make it so plentiful as to be able to sell 
it for a good price. It is due solely to 
the mandate of a statute that deer are 
now roaming in large numbers in Ver- 
mont, and it is due solely to a law that 
the State is unable to profit by it. 

Returns From California. 

In a personal letter the executive of- 
ficer of the California Fish and Game 
Commission says the "Commission is 
strongly in favor of breeding game in 
large numbers. The commission has ex- 
pended approximately $75,000 in the ef- 
fort to make game breeding an industry 
of the State and is doing and will do 
nothing to hamper the operations of le- 
gitimate breeders, no matter how small 
or how large they may be. We have 
given to such breeders and have sold 
them at far less than cost, several thou- 
sand dollars worth of pheasants and 
other birds, to be |used for breeding 
stock. In fact, if there is anything that 
the Commission should and could do to 
aid the game breeders of California, that 
thing either has been done already or 
will be done the moment the need and 
the remedy is called to our attention." 
And the reward for this effort and ex- 
pense shall come later — "some thirtyfold, 
some sixtyfold and some an hundred- 
fold." 



Much in a Name. 

There is a daily paper in Council 
Bluffs, Iowa, which is called "The Non- 
pareil," and to the request of State Game 
Warden Hinshaw that Iowa have a 
game farm to encourage and teach game 
breeding as an industry, this six point 
newspaper responds that such an idea 
is a "pipe dream." If it would do any 
good we might refer this Rip Van Win- 
kle editor to what is being done to make 
game breeding a profitable industry in 
many other states. But he is so far in 
the rear of the run of progress that he 
can't hear the music of the band wagon. 

Who is the "Moloch?" 

The opposition of game breeders and 
wardens of New York State to the im- 
portation of game bred in other states 
has such a slender foundation of reason 
that it can scarcely be very strong nu- 
merically. As well oppose the importa- 
tion of potatoes or beef from other 
states. It has been hinted that if game 
from other states be brought to New 
York City it will all be gobbled up by 
a certain "Moloch" just as were the first- 
born of the Ammonites of old. If there 
is any truth in this then it were better 
to get rid of the Moloch and let the 
game come in. The injury of many for 
the benefit of a few is out of date. 
This is the 20th century and not B. C. 
times. "Have a heart." 

A Hard New Jersey Winter. 

It has been an unusually severe winter 
for wild birds in New Jersey, not so 
much because of the snow and sleet as 
because there was only a meager food 
supply under the best weather condi- 
tions. 

But a concerted movement for feeding 
them would easily obviate their distress. 
Farmers feed their chickens 365 days of 
the year. It is rare that wild birds need 
be fed more than a dozen times a year 
and except in abnormal winter weather 
they need not be fed at all. A country 
without birds is like an abandoned, rot- 
ting and dilapidated dwelling, unfit for 
human habitation. 



THE GAME BREEDER 7 

THE SILVER FOX. 

~j^ By Ned Dearborn, 
Assistant Biologist, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

- [This historical sketchof the silver fox industry is from bulletin No. 301, U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. The bulletin contains much valuable information about the area 
suitable for foxes, the food, the handling, etc., and is illustrated with cuts showing inclosures. 
Readers interested in fur farming can procure the bulletin by writing to the Agricultural 
Department.] 

The name "silver fox," as commonly fairly common, the silver gray scarce, 
used by furriers, includes the dark phases and the pure black very rare, 
of the ordinary red fox, variously called The market value of skins of the dif- 
silver, silver gray, silver black, or black, ferent phases depends upon the relative 
It should not be confused with the gray, scarcity of the animals. The price paid 
or tree, fox of the United States, the fur for black skins, however, has recently 
of which is of comparatively little value, fallen considerably below that of silvers, 
The color of the red fox of the North- for the reason that furriers now dye 
eastern States and of its allies of the ordinary red fox skins a lustrous black, 
colder parts of North America varies and put them on the market at a com- 
from red to black, and these extremes, paratively low figure, 
with their gradations, form four more or Domestication of the fox was first 
less distinct phases, known respectively achieved in 1894 by Robert T. Oulton 
as red, cross (or patch), silver, and and Charles Dalton on Prince Edward 
black. In the red phase the fur is en- Island, a Canadian Province in the Gulf 
tirely rich fulvous, except for restricted of St. Lawrence. Silver fox pelts have 
black markings on the feet and ears, a continuously commanded high prices, 
white area at the end of the tail, and and hunters have been correspondingly 
certain white-tipped hairs on the back keen to secure them. It is not strange, 
and rump. Grading into the next phase therefore, that the first successful breed- 
the black increases in extent until, in the ers of this rare animal were men who 
typical cross fox, the black predominates had pursued it in the chase. The two 
on the feet, legs and underparts, while mentioned had hunted foxes together and 
fulvous overlaying black covers most of had frequently bought and sold fox pelts 
the head, shoulders and back. A gradual of their neighbors. Oulton was once 
increase of the black and elimination of lucky enough to shoot a silver fox, the 
the fulvous, or its replacement by white, skin of which netted $138. Becoming 
results in the next phase, the silver (or impressed with the possibility of domes- 
silver gray) fox, in which the entire ticating such valuable fur bearers, Oul- 
pelage is dark at the base and heavily or ton and Dalton separately experimented 
lightly overlaid with grayish white. The in building fox-proof fences and in feed- 
color of silver foxes varies from grizzly ing and breeding the animals. After sev- 
to pure black, except for a few white- eral years' work on these problems they 
tipped hairs on the back and rump, formed a partnership in 1894, built a 
Finally, in the black phase, the white is ranch, and stocked it with two pairs of 
absent from all parts except the tip of the silver foxes. This became the first 
tail, which is white in all four phases, profitable fox ranch, the forerunner of 
The red phase is much more abundant a remarkable and, for that region, a revo- 
than the others, but all four interbreed lutionizing industry, 
freely, and wherever one occurs occa- At that time black pelts brought much 
sional examples of the others may be higher prices than silver pelts. This 
expected. In general the cross fox is prompted Oulton & Dalton to retain their 



S THE GAME BREEDER 

darker animals and dispose of the lighter to engage in fox farming alone. Almost 
ones, and as a result each successive lot immediately, however, companies were 
of pelts from their yards was darker formed for the benefit of those having 
than those of previous years. Finally, foxes to sell. It was customary for a 
in 1910, they were able to send to the company to take them over. An attrac- 
London sales the finest collection of sil- tive prospectus containing pictures of sil- 
ver fox pelts that had ever appeared ver foxes, an account of the 1910 sale 
there. This lot, containing 25 pelts, of pelts, and a list of companies which 
brought an average of $1,386 each, the had paid dividends of 20 to 500 per 
best one selling for $2,624. In the mean- cent, was published, and the stock sold 
time a few other small ranches had been through brokers and solicitors. Foxes 
started in the Maritime Provinces, New- that would bring $12,000 or $15,000 a 
foundland, Maine, Ontario, Michigan pair in the open market were usually 
and Alaska. The policy of the half capitalized in companies at $18,000 or 
dozen Prince Edward Islanders in that $20,000, which, after allowing for com- 
business had been to monopolize it. missions, installation of pens, and other 
They had kept their own counsel, and ranch necessities, left a tolerably safe 
not even their families were enlightened balance from which to pay the first year's 
as to methods. The pelts had been running expenses. Another reason for 
shipped three in a package by parcel the multiplication of fox companies is 
post from a distant post office, and re- found in the income to be derived from 
ports of the sales had been received in them by brokers and promoters, and 
code. The fox raisers had entered into many companies were formed by men 
a compact to sell no live silver foxes and having no other interest. The outbreak 
had bought the best that could be ob- of the European war, in the summer of 
tained. Notwithstanding their secrecy, 1914, interrupted and probably ended 
the evident improvement in their finan- these speculative operations. Ranch-bred 
cial conditions was noticed by their silver foxes have recently been adver- 
neighbors, who thereupon desired to par- tised for sale at from $1,500 to $2,000 
ticipate. a pair. In some of the western Prov- 

Disclosure of the results of the 1910 inces and Territories of Canada, where 

sales was the climax of the first stage only those foxes born or kept for a year 

in the development of fox farming, or more in captivity are allowed to be 

People who formerly had known some- exported, prices of wild half-grown sil- 

thing of the business were now eager to vers run from $150 to $250 each. Prior 

engage in it. Those having money in- to the war a general stagnation in the 

vested it in foxes. Others mortgaged fur trade was beginning to have a de- 

their farms for the purpose or fitted up pressing influence on prices of live foxes, 

ranching facilities and boarded foxes for The June, 1914, sale of silver fox skins 

a share of the progeny. How rapidly in, London averaged only about $118 

prices for breeding stock advanced is each. From present indications values 

well illustrated by the experience of one of foxes and of pelts are likely soon to 

ranchman who sold his first pair of cubs fall as low as they were before 1910. 
for $750, and other pairs successively In the pioneer days, when proper 

for $3,000, $12,000, $13,000 and $14,000. methods of handling foxes were un- 

In the fall of 1913 good ranch-bred cubs known, many failures resulted from 

six months old sold for from $11,000 to ignorance and carelessness. The excite- 

$15,000 a pair. Pairs that had had large ment following the fur sales of 1910 

litters were valued at about twice as hastened the improvement of methods 

much as six-months-old cubs. of feeding, handling and breeding. It 

The maintenance of this prodigious in- also broke the monopoly, and caused a 

flation of prices was due mainly to stock rapid distribution of foxes and of iri- 

companies, which originally were formed formation concerning them. Now, with 

by individuals without sufficient capital a comparatively large number of silver 



THE GAME BREEDER 



9 



foxes in domestication, with a clearer 
understanding of their successful man- 
agement, and with a return of moderate 
prices for breeders, a steady, healthy and 
general development of silver fox farm- 
ing may be expected. 

Fox ranches are established in most 
of the Canadian Provinces and in Maine, 
New Hampshire, Massachusetts, New 
York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin, 
Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Oregon, 
Washington and Alaska. In 1913 there 
were 277 fox ranches on Prince Edward 
Island alone. There foxes have the same 
status as other domestic animals in be- 
ing subject to taxation; this in 1913 
yielded the Province a revenue of $37,- 
172. In a recent report written from 
Charlottetown by Consul Livingston T. 
Mays the number of domestic silver 
foxes on Prince Edward Island in April, 
1914, was given as about 1,600, and in 
the following December as about 2,600, 
the increase for the year being approxi- 
mately 66 per cent., or considerably be- 
low the average increase of former years. 
The value of the foxes on this island at 



the close of 1913, as estimated by the 
Commissioner of Agriculture, was over 
$15,000,000. A report of the provincial 
secretary, issued May 7, 1914, shows that 
there had been incorporated in the Prov- 
ince up to that time 196 fur-farming 
companies, nearly all of which were de- 
voted to fox raising, carrying an author- 
ized capitalization of $24,305,700. In 
December, 1914, the United States consul 
on Prince Edward Island reported that 
the capitalization had reached $31,500,- 
000. From the foregoing it is evident 
that anyone contemplating an investment 
in fox farming, either directly or in the 
stock of an organized company, should 
first carefully consider all values in their 
relation to the actual returns possible 
from the average increase of the breed- 
ing stock. As pointed out elsewhere in 
this bulletin, prices of both live silver 
foxes and fox pelts are now far below 
prices paid a few years ago. The busi- 
ness of fox breeding will be on a much 
more stable basis than at present when 
the value of breeding animals bears an 
approximate relation to the value of their 
pelts in the open market. \ 



WALLACE EVANS GAME FARM. 

Wood Duck in Large Numbers and Pheasants Reared Near St. 

Charles, 111. 



1 raise every year large numbers of the 
different varieties of wild ducks, espe- 
cially wood ducks. Last season I raised 
over twelve hundred young wood ducks, 
and this spring I expect to raise more 
still as I am keeping over an extra large 
breeding stock, and the natural lakes and 
running water on our new farm seems 
tc be well adapted for the raising of 
the rarer varieties of wild ducks, 

All my wood hens last year averaged 
about thirty eggs each, and I expect to 
get even more this season. I also breed 
quite a number of Mandarin ducks, the 
hens of this variety seldom lay over ten 
•or twelve eggs in a season, which are 
generally very fertile and the birds are 
strong and very easy to raise. 



I have never done very much with 
black mallards, as there seems to be very 
little demand for them, and it hardly 
pays to keep a large flock of breeders; 
real wild black mallards in captivity 
seldom lay over twenty eggs to a bird 
even when they are forced with the cor- 
rect kind of foods. 

I have never succeeded in getting Blue 
Wing Teal to lay over sixteen or eighteen 
eggs, no matter how carefully they are 
fed, and the same applies to the Green 
Wing and the Gargany. I usually lift 
part of the eggs from the different va- 
rieties of wild ducks and hatch them 
under chickens, except in the wood 
ducks and mallards. These, of course, 
are all raised with chickens. 



10 THE GAME BREEDER 

On our new farm here all these birds the rarer varieties of pheasants so that 

have large ponds and many acres of you can see the difference between it and 

land to roam over, and it is very hard the ordinary domestic poultry food which 

for us to locate all the nests of the wild is generally used which "turns their toes 

ducks, and especially so of the nests of to the daisies" sooner or later, 
the different varieties of teal. I have I will send you some photos of my 

always had splendid luck in raising the vermin trap later. I consider this kind 

Ruddy ducks, especially the European, of trap positively the best thing that has 

Some of these build their nests three or ever been invented for this particular 

four feet in the earth around the banks business, and I can assure you that I 

of the ponds, but last year I succeeded would not be able to run this farm 

in getting a good many of the Ruddys successfully without them. They catch 

to build their nests in open ended boxes raccoons, minks, skunks, weasels, pos- 

somewhat like the ones we use for wood sums, rats and cats. These traps will 

ducks. catch old rats around buildings when all. 

My success in raising nearly all the other traps fail. There is hardly a day 

rarer varieties of pheasants and ducks during the year that my men don't bring 

is due to a great extent to my being in several head of vermin after making 

able to furnish them with the proper the rounds of these traps. I use them 

kinds of food not alone during the breed- mostly on the boundary fences which on 

ing season, but during the winter months, our new farm runs miles without a break 

Nearly all of the rarer and expensive in them. It takes nearly all one man's 

varieties of pheasants which are kept in time to keep down the yermin here and 

the different zoological parks throughout even then we have disastrous losses from 

the world die for want of the correct time to time. 

kind of food. For instance, the Trago- By the end of this year we expect to 

pans, Monauls and other high altitude have the farm nearly completed, and I 

birds seldom survive in these zoos over can assure you it will be a peach when 

two years, but if properly fed they will we get through with it. . We have our 

live from five to ten years and even own railroad tracks and private freight 

longer. station on the farm, which makes it very 

I am sending you under separate cover handy and inexpensive for handling our 

a sample of the correct food for feeding feed and the shipping out of live stock. 



CAT TALES. 

Told by E. H. Forbush, Massachusetts State Ornithologist. 

Destroys a Universal Pest. before her aunt's rising hour the cat 

The United States Department of brought in a nice fat robin, unharmed, 

Agriculture has made a study of the and penned it in the corner of the 

economic value of the quail and has kitchen, apparently as a gift for the aunt, 

found that it is virtually the only bird Although the bird always was set free 

which devours that universal pest, the the cat continued to catch one each 

potato bug. morning having first caught its own 

= breakfast. It would be interesting to 

Robins for Breakfast. know how many birds that cat ate that 

Miss Helen Winslow says that her season beside those that it brought in. 

aunt in Greenfield had a cat that was = 

in the habit of catching his own break- Fecundity of the Cat. 

fast early each summer morning before Cats are known to have from two to 

the family was up — a very common habit four broods yearly, with from five to 

by the way. Invariably, she says, just nine in each brood. Fostered and pro- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



11 



tected from their enemies, a single pair 
might produce an enormous number in a 
few years. Hence the necessity for 
checking such increase promptly by kill- 
ing all superfluous kittens soon after 
birth. An undue increase of the species 
must occur otherwise as cats have very 
few effective natural enemies in the New 
England States. 

Vagabond Cats in the Country. 

Wild or feral house cats that pass their 
lives mainly in the fields or woods are 
seen rarely by human eyes, except by 
those of the hunter or naturalist. There- 
fore many people who have never in- 
vestigated the matter, and never have 
seen such cats, find it hard to believe 
that they are numerous enough to be a 
great menace to wild life, but nearly all 
my most observant correspondents who 
roam the woods and fields report traces 
of many cats. 

On 20 Acres. 

Mrs. Mabel Osgood Wright, Fairfield, 
Conn., president of the Connecticut Au- 
dubon Society, writes that in seven 
months, twenty-eight cats have been shot 
on her twenty acres, although the six 
nearest neighbors keep none. 

Ye Historick Cat of 1498. 

The cat is surely most like to the Leo- 
parde, and hathe a great mouthe, and 
sharp teeth, and a long tongue, plyante, 
thin and subtle. He lappeth therewith 
when he drinketh, as other beates do that 
have the nether lip shorter than the over ; 
for, by cause of unevenness of lips, such 
beates suck not in drinking, but lap and 
lick as Aristotle saith, and Plinius also. 

Bird Slaughter by Cats. • 

Dr. Anne E. Perkins of Gowanda, N. 
Y., who has had a long experience with 
pets, tells of a cat which brought in 
meadowlarks, an oven-bird, two hum- 
ming birds and a flicker within a few 
days. 

Birds Killed Per Cat. 

Numerous correspondents have known 
individual cats to kill from 2 to 8 birds 



in a day, but the average is much small- 
er than this. Two hundred and twenty- 
six correspondents report the maximum 
number of birds they have known to be 
killed by 1 cat in a day, and the day's 
work for these 226 cats is 624 birds, or 
2.7 birds per cat per day. 

Game Birds Killed By Cats. 

Perhaps the game bird most commonly 
killed by the cat in southern New Eng- 
land is the bobwhite. This species, one 
of the most useful of all birds to the 
farmer, highly valued as a game bird, 
frequents grass fields, gardens, grain 
fields, and weed and bush thickets where 
the cat hunts. Sportsmen say that they 
very often find cats in "quail covers," 
and not infrequently see them with the 
birds in their mouths. 



Fond of Pheasants and Partridges. 

Since the introduced ring-necked 
pheasant has become common in Massa- 
chusetts, many reports of the killing of 
these birds by cats have been received. 
They are taken from the time the chicks 
are hatched until they are full-grown. 

The Cat on the Game Preserve. 

All experienced gamekeepers regard 
this animal as one of the most vicious 
and despicable of the so-called vermin 
which often render the raising of game 
bird a precarious calling. Prof. Clif- 
ton F. Hodge, a pioneer in the success- 
ful artificial rearing of grouse and bob- 
whites, was almost forced by cats to 
give up his experiments in Worcester, 
Mass. 

A Day's Work. 

Female cats with kittens often are 
very destructive to birds. I have known 
such a cat in June to destroy within 
twenty-four hours the young in six nests 
and also two of the parent birds, but 
this is the maximum. 

Also Fond of Chickens. 

Mr. Charles M. Field of Shrewsbury, 
has known a cat to kill eighteen chicks in 



12 



THE GAME BREEDER 



a day. Mr. Frederick W. Goodwin of of twenty-five. Mr. A. B. Brundage, of 

East Boston, gives a record of twenty- Danbury, Conn., tells of thirty-four as a 

four killed by a cat in one day. Miss day's work for one lusty cat. 
Mabel McRae, Boylston, has a record (To be continued in our next.) 



A TRAPSHOOTING SCHOOL. 

By George Frank Lord. 



The mere mention of a trapshooting 
school will cause sportsmen to sit up and 
take notice, as the saying goes, for while 
there have been and still are places where 
tennis, golf and other sports are taught 
novices, this country has never boasted 
anything in the form of a shooting 
school. Anticipating the many queries 
which will follow the announcement of 
the starting of the trapshooting school, 
E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co. send out 
the following information concerning 
same: 

The school will be operated at Atlan- 
tic City, N. J., the greatest year round 
pleasure resort in the world, and a place 
annually visited by more sportsmen than 
any other city. The convenience of the 
sportsmen has been considered in deter- 
mining the location of the school, which 
will be right in the center of activities, 
on Young's Million Dollar Pier, at the 
end. 

The purpose of this new shooting 
school is threefold, viz., to teach the 
proper care and use of firearms ; to in- 
struct men and women in the art of 
trapshooting, and to provide a place 
where the thousands and thousands of 
"gun bugs" who yearly visit Atlantic 
City may enjoy their favorite sport, en- 
gage in trophy contests, team races, etc., 
in a place easily accessible and at a 
moderate cost. 

The school will be in operation about 
March 15th, or by April 1st at the out- 
side. The equipment will consist of one 
Ideal Leggett, and one Western McCrea 
automatic trap, standard targets being 
used, twenty gauge guns of practically 
every make, and competent men in 
charge. The targets will be thrown 



against a background of water, targets 
and shot falling into the Atlantic Ocean. 
Standard trap loads will be on sale, but 
only twenty gauges may be used. The 
targets will be thrown about forty yards. 
A person desiring to use his own gun 
may do so, but only factory loaded am- 
munition can be shot on the range. 

The services of Hertry Hewgill Ste- 
vens, famous professional and known to 
everyone in the trapshooting game as 
"Hank," have been secured and he will 
be in charge of the school as manager, 
and will act as personal instructor at no 
cost whatever to anyone desiring his 
services. Mr. Stevens has been shooting 
since 1888, and nearly thirty years ag 
competed on the trapshooting team of 
Rutgers College, of which he is a grad- 
uate, against the Princeton, Yale and 
other college teams. In the year 1903 
Mr. Stevens turned professional goin 
first with the DuPont Powder Company 
and later representing one of the leading 
Eastern gun and ammunition manufac- 
turers, traveling for them in practically 
every section of the country. He is now 
back with his first employers. 

Mr. Stevens is well equipped by per- 
sonality, experience and ability to fill his 
new position. He has made for himself 
a host of friends everywhere, who will 
always remember him as the genial 
"Hank." One of the original Westy 
Hogans, he has done much to insure the 
present success of that organization. His 
experience covers every phase of the 
gun and ammunition game, and all kinds 
of game shooting as well as trapshooting. 
It may be well to say also that he coached 
the 1913 Princeton College trapshoot- 
ing team, which won the intercollegiate 



THE GAME BREEDER 



13 



trapshooting contest, and also the 1915 
Yale College trapshooting team, which 
won the championship last year. When 
Mr. Stevens' ability as a shooter comes 
up, one has but to refer to the official 
trapshooting records for the past several 
years to appreciate his true worth, and 
men who have shot with him in the field 
and from the blinds and shooting boxes 
will tell you that his aim is deadly — in 
fact he seldom misses. . 

In inaugurating this new school, the 
DuPont Company believes that it will 
prove a boon to every sportsman who 
visits Atlantic City, and will also fill a 
long felt want on the part of those who 
have desired to learn to shoot under the 



tutelage of a competent instructor, such 
as Mr. Stevens. From time to time 
events will be arranged for groups of 
shooters who may be at the seaside re- 
sort, and team races and trophy events 
staged. Local shooters will also have 
events arranged for them, or may ar- 
range their own events, and shoot them 
over the school traps. In fact, Mr. Ste- 
vens will see to it personally that every- 
thing possible is done to make the visit 
of sportsmen to Atlantic City as pleasant 
as .possible, and sportsmen and sports- 
women everyhwere are extended a cor- 
dial invitation to call and see him at 
Young's Million Dollar Pier after March 
15th. 



MORE LEAD POISONING. 

By Feed D. Hoyt. 



This is written in response to Mr. W. 
L. Finley's article, "Lead Poisoned Mal- 
lards," in your January issue And I 




Stomach of a captive mallard which died on her nest the 
day she hatched her ducklings. 

wish to congratulate Mr. Finley, whom 
I know personally, on his successful wild 
life pictures, which I had the pleasure 
of seeing at the University of California. 



Mr. Finley is a thorough conservationist 
with no selfish ways — one of the many 
men and societies which responded to 
my appeal for help to get the compulsory 
teaching of bird life in the public schools 
of California, which I am very happy to 
say has become a law in this State. 

While Mr. Finley has told you the 
conditon in which the ducks were found, 
and touched briefly on other data, I will 
endeavor to quote a few facts, as I have 
studied them for the past twenty-five 
years. That the Mallard duck will eat 
anything that is solid, from a small gravel 
stone to a ten-penny nail, will be seen 
from the accompanying photograph. This 
is the stomach of a captive Mallard which 
died on her nest on the day that she 
hatched her clutch of ducklings. Just to 
show how strong is the tendency of 
nature to reproduce itself, this duck had 
been dying five weeks, and seemed only 
to wait until her eggs were hatched, as 
when I removed the stomach, which had 
at last been punctured by a three-inch 
steel nail, the inside cavity of the bird 
was filled with blood. 

The stomach, which I have had pre- 
served in a bottle for three years, and 
bad photographed, contained eleven steel 
nails, from the size of a small brad, to 



14 



THE GAME BREEDER 



a spike fully three inches long, a num- 
ber of cut nail heads, several tacks and 
small bits of iron. The gravel and acids 
of the stomach had worn the nails al- 
most through in many places and 
sharpened them to needle points, as will 
be seen in the picture. This was not a 
case of poisoning, but death came from 
the hemorrhage after the nails had punc- 
tured the walls of the stomach. 

I have examined a great number of 
ducks which I have killed and found dead 
on the marsh. In the stomach of one 
bird there was seventy-two chilled shot 
and a brass collar button in another, a 
small wood screw, a dozen shot and a 
piece of cast iron, all much worn. Of 
over thirty ducks which I have ex- 
amined, all have contained from a few 
to a half ounce of shot. While I have 
examined many other species of duck, 



only in the Mallard have I found these 
conditions. 

To ' sum up the whole matter, I find 
that we do all our shooting on the same 
ponds, where the ducks are baited or fed. 
For lack of grit, the Mallard takes up 
from the bottom of our four-inch deep 
ponds everything that seems to answer 
the purpose of ginding material for its 
food, as in no places around San Fran- 
cisco Bay or up the Sacramento or San 
Jauquin rivers where shooting is done, 
is there any gravel; nothing but the soft 
marsh mud, which would run through a 
hundred mesh sieve like water. 

Shooting, as we do, on these ponds 
where we feed, the Mallard with his 
long neck reaches down in the shallow 
water, readily picking up the shot lying 
on the mud, and this, as Mr. Finley has 
said, causes a lingering death either by 
starvation or poisoning. 



GAME PROTECTIVE ASSOCIATION. 

Their Recent National Conference in This City. 

By A. A. Hill. 



A meeting of sportsmen, game com- 
missioners and wardens was recently held 
at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in this city 
under the auspices of the Department 
of Game Breeding and Preserving of the 
American Game Protective Association. 
Papers were read on Game Preserving 
in America, by A. G. MacVicar, on 
"Breeding Wild Turkey," by JHenry P. 
Bridges, and on "Deer and Elk Breed- 
ing," by John M. Philips. Lee S. Cran- 
dall reported on the "Breeding of Mis- 
cellaneous Species of Game." 

A. G. MacVicar, head keeper of the 
Childs-Walcott Preserve in Connecticut, 
assailed the neglect of the native species 
of game birds in favor of the imported 
species. "It seems rather strange," he 
said, "that many people spend a lot of 
money and time in trying to establish 
foreign game without making any at- 
tempt to remedy the conditions that have 
so nearly exterminated the natives." . 

Quail, pheasants, ruffed grouse, duck, 
and some woodcock can be bred in New 



England and in regions having similar 
physical features and climate, said Mr. 
MacVicar. To bring back these native 
birds to something like their former num- 
bers, two things must be done : destroy 
the enemies of game by thorough and 
systematic trapping and increase the food 
supply. 

Of the enemies of game house-cats and 
hawks are the most destructive. "An 
efficient gamekeeper," said Mr. Mac 
Vicar, "will take as much pains to trap 
a predatory cat in June as a fur trap- 
per will to trap a nine-dollar fox in Jan- 
uary. The wandering cat does more 
damage among birds than all other ver- 
min combined." 

"Food," he continued, "can be supplied 
at small expense by sowing patches of 
buckwheat, millet, brown corn, and kaf- 
fir corn. The latter is available in snow, 
as the stiff stalk keeps the grain above 
the snow, and therefore where the birds 
can get it. These food patches should 
always be as near cover as possible and 
in a sheltered location. Barberries, 



THE GAME BREEDER 



15 



which grow readily in New England, are 
also valuable food, and can be used to 
feed pheasants, quail and grouse." 

John M. Phillips spoke of conservation 
of game, especially as it is practised in 
Pennsylvania. In that state, a million 
acres have been set aside in twenty-six 
counties for a state game preserve, he 
said. Sanctuaries of 3,200 acres each 
are established in the center of tracts of 
state land, protected by fire cuttings and 
cared for by a warden who traps vermin 
and prepares food for game. Pennsyl- 
vania is the only state that protects the 
black bear, and last year between 300 
and 400 were killed there. 

The work of breeding and protecting 
deer in Pennsylvania has resulted in such 
an increase that between 2,000 and 2,500 
bucks were killed this year. The aver- 
age weight of deer killed has increased 
from 90 pounds ten years ago to 140 
pounds, the increase being due to the 
protection accorded fawns and does. 

The report of E. A. Quarles, director 
of the Propagation Department of Game 
Breeding of the Protection Association, 
was listened to with interest. Ruffed 
grouse, ringnecked pheasants and mal- 
lards, Dr. George W. Field, Dr. Charles 

C. Adams, Mr. Quarles and Adam Scott. 
At the dinner, in the evening, George 

D. Pratt, Conservation Commissioner of 
New York, spoke on "What New York 
is Doing for Conservation." H. S. 
Graves, United States Forester, talked on 
"Game Conservation on Public Lands 
with Special Reference to Elk," and the 
other speakers were Norman McClintock, 
Dr. Allen A. Allen, of Cornell Univer- 
sity, and William L. Finley, State Biol- 
ogist of Oregon. 

The proposal that New York State be 
called upon to permit the importation of 
wild ducks and other game bred in cap- 
tivity in other states almost brought to 
a sudden end the second day's session. 
The matter touched upon has caused 
much dissension in the past. The New 
York State laws now prohibit such im- 
portation. A firm recently was fined 
$20,000 for selling wild ducks alleged to 
have been bred and raised near Goshen, 
but which really were said to have been 
trapped in Virginia. 



The subject was introduced by John 
W. Titcomb, Conservation Commissioner 
of Vermont. He proposed that the as- 
sociation go on record for the change in 
the New ^ork State Game laws respect- 
ing importations. His resolution gave 
some of the New York members a shock. 

William B. Boulton, chairman, finally 
calmed the meeting by appointing the 
following committee to consider the reso- 
lution: H. M. Brigham, of New York, 
chairman; J. W. Titcomb, John Hay- 
wood, of Massachusetts; J. B. Burnham 
and J. C. O'Connor, both of New York 
State. The committee will report at the 
next annual meeting, if they don't for- 
get it. 

♦ — 

Game Cookery. 

Game, being rich in phosphates, is 
valuable for invalids. — The Boston Cook 
Book. 

English and other cook books are filled 
with valuable recipes for cooking all 
species of game. American books on 
cooking for the most part contain little 
or nothing on this subject because we 
have no game to cook. America should 
have more game in its markets than any 
country in the world. We still have 
enough stock birds and quadrupeds to 
fill the markets to overflowing in five 
years provided the industry of game 
breeding be encouraged and not pro- 
hibited by law. 

We predict that new revised editions 
of the American books will contain many 
valuable chapters on the cooking of 
quail, grouse, wild-fowl, snipe, wood- 
cock and venison and we are so sure 
that America quickly will become the big- 
gest game producing country in the 
world, that we would suggest to the 
publishers, the desirability of such chap- 
ters. The game law industry has seen 
its best days. The game breeding in- 
dustry is booming. Many states already 
have amended their laws so that it is no 
longer criminal to profitably produce the 
desirable foods which are valuable for 
people in good health as well as for in- 
valids. 

We shall publish from time to time 
good recipes for cooking game and game 
fish. 



16 



THE GAME BREEDER 



A FAIR AMENDMENT. 

A bill to amend the nonsensical N. Y. 
Conservation law (popularly known as 
one of the leading, "Fool Laws," as the 
newspapers say), so as to permit the sale 
of deer, pheasants, and ducks from other 
States in the New York markets, has 
some chance at Albany we are told. The 
amendment is quite absurd, of course, 
and in harmony with the original "fool" 
enactment in that it permits only the im- 
portation and sale of the game which 
least needs the breeders' attention. It is 
a stride, however, in the right direction 
and we hope it will pass. It is better 
to kill nonsense piecemeal than not to kill 
it at all. 

The following bill may be enacted in 
New York: 

To Amend the New York Conserva- 
tion Law. 

"Section 377. Certain mammals and birds 
may be imported from without the State and 
sold. Any person engaged in the business of 
raising and selling domesticated American elk, 
whitetail deer, European red deer and fallow 
deer, roebuck, pheasants, mallard ducks and 
black ducks, or any of them, in a wholly en- 
closed preserve or entire island, of which he 
is the owner or lessee, under a breeder's law 
providing for the tagging of all preserve-bred 
game and otherwise similar in principle to the 
law of the State of New York in such case 
made and provided, may make application in 
writing to the commission for a permit to im- 
port such mammals or birds into the State of 
New York and sell the same. In the event 
that the commission shall be satisfied that the 
said mammals and birds are. bred in captivity 
and are killed and tagged under a breeding 
law similar in principle to that of the State of 
New York, upon the payment of a fee of five 
dollars, together with such additional sum as 
the commissioner may determine to cover the 
necessary cost of inspection, the commission 
may in its discretion issue a revocable permit 
in writing to such applicant to import such 
mammals and birds raised as aforesaid into the 
State of New York and to sell the same, in 
which case the provisions of sections three 
hundred and seventy-two, three hundred and 
seventy-three and there hundred and seventy- 
four of the conservation law, in so far as the 
same are applicable, shall apply. 

"Section 2. This act shall take effect imme- 
diately." 

The question is on the passage of the 
bill. Shall the bill pass? The Game 
Breeder votes aye, because it is much 
better than nothing. 



GAME EATING. 

We especially like to eat quail, grouse 
and other game birds when we know that 
by so doing we are helping to make them 
plentiful and to keep them so. 

The object of the game dinners of the 
Game Conservation Society is to make 
game eating fashionable ; to restore some 
of the best American foods to the table. 

We have no doubt the society will be 
in the market for cinnamon teal and 
other comparatively rare species in order 
to serve them as samples and to induce 
the people to buy and to eat the desirable 
foods liberally. Money has been abund- 
ant to secure game law absurdities. We 
see considerable in sight to secure more 
game for sport and for food. 

The fight for "more game" having 
been won, in so far as the common half- 
bred mallards and pheasants are con- 
sumed in many States, and the laws hav- 
ing been amended so as to make it pos- 
sible to produce other species in some 
States, it is high time that the eating of 
all species should be made not only fash- 
ionable but commonplace. The money 
used to purchase the food surely will find 
its way, under proper regulations, to the 
places where the food can be produced 
cheaply. "More game eating; more 
game," is our new and revised slogan. 
Incidentally, we can see a restoration of 
field sports; the breeding and sale of 
shooting dogs; the sale and use of guns 
and ammunition, etc., and a general good 
time. We observed editorially a few 
years ago, "there's a good time coming; 
its almost here." 



Game Breeding Instruction. 

A course in the breeding of game 
birds in captivity has been added to the 
zoology work of the Gary public schools 
system, in Gary, Ind. E. A. Spaulding, 
principal of the Emerson School of the 
Gary system, first suggested the idea. An 
appeal was made to Wallace Evans, of 
St. Charles, 111., the large breeder of 
game birds, who agreed to supply the 
school with all the necessary stock to 
start breeding ringneck pheasants, mal- 
lard ducks and gray call ducks. 

It is contended that the work of the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



17 




Young Mallards. 



From Our Wild Fowl and Waders. 



Gary schools will afford an opportunity 
for technical instruction along this 
branch of wild life conservation to bo\s 
and girls when their minds are in a 
particularly receptive condition to ideas 
of this sort. The experiment will be 
watched with interest by sportsmen and 
thousands of others who are interested 
in wild life conservation. 



A Fishy Yarn. 

Capt. George W. Greenleaf, of the 
U. S. Fisheries Steamer Gannet, in "The 
Maine Woods" : "The Gannet was out 
gathering cod eggs for the hatchery. 
Among the cods was one that didn't 
yield many eggs, although Dave Penning- 
ton squeezed her until she almost burst. 
Capt. Greenleaf thought there should be 
more eggs and took hold, with no bet- 
ter results. Wondering, he slit the fish 
open with a knife and took out a full- 
grown coot." Some doubt it, just as 
they doubt the story of Jonah. 



A Worthy Apotheosis. 

Henry P. Bridges, Baltimore, Md. : 
"The gorgeous colors of the wild turkey 
glisten in the sunshine like varnished 
bronze. His broad shoulders and deep 
chest and firm steps show that he is 
as hardy as an oak. He has a clean 
cut game head, jeweled with bright eyes. 
He is always on the lookout for trouble, 
and his suspicions make him the grand- 
est American game bird for the hunter 
to stalk and get a shot .at." 



Crimes and criminal laws should not be 
made on junketing expeditions through- 
out the country after "conferences" with 
the prospective criminals, termed "hear- 
ings." Even if criminal laws must be 
thus made, the head of the construction 
group should not be a doctor of medi- 
cine. Give us someone who understands 
legal principles and we will stand a 
chance of having respectable laws and 
not criminal absurdities. 



18 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T 1 ?? Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, APRIL, 1916 



TERMS : 

10 Cents a Copy— $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 



The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixot-io, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary 

Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



THREE CHEERS FOR KEN- 
TUCKY, ANOTHER "MORE 
GAME" STATE. 

We are pleased to announce that the 
Kentucky bill referred to in our Survey 
of the Field, passed, as we predicted it 
would. It is now the law, and a very 
good one, it seems to us. 



CALIFORNIA. 

We had formed the opinion that the 
•California Commission was in favor of 
game breeding and that there must be 
some mistake in the complaints coming to 
The Game Breeder from that state. We 
bjelieve it will be an easy matter for 
California breeders to enlist the depart- 
ment in an effort to have the game per- 
mits issued at a nominal cost or for 
nothing, as they are in Massachusetts. 

An important amendment should be 
enacted, also, in California, as elsewhere, 
permitting breeders to trap game birds 
for propagation purposes. It is per- 
fectly absurd to issue a license to every 
one to destroy a certain number of birds 
daily and to refuse to permit breeders 
to take a similar number of birds alive 
for the purpose of multiplying their 
numbers for sport and for profit. There 
is a shortage of stock birds, and this 
must continue until it is legal to trap 
them for the purpose of propagating as 
freely as it now is to shoot for the 
purpose of destroying. 



LET US BREED ALL SPECIES. 

Often we have pointed out the ab- 
surdity of granting to breeders the right 
to look after the foreign birds which are 
in no danger of being extirpated any- 
where and of denying the right to look 
after our indigenous grouse quail and 
other game which rapidly are being ex- 
terminated. Many states now permit 
the, breeding of all species and New 
York appears to be quite behind the 
times. 

WHY? 

A few out of town game breeders who 
called at the office of the Game Con- 
servation Society after the meeting 01 
the American Protective Association, 
seemed to be much disappointed at the 
action of the Association in sending to a 
committee Mr. Titcomb's proposition to 
permit the breeders of other states to 
sell their game in New York, just as 
English, French and other foreign breed- 
ers do. As we understand the matter, 
the resolution was sent to a committee 
after the chairman had referred to it as 
a "bomb," and the committee was given 
a year to report. A western breeder 
said this, of course, was intended to kill 
the proposition. 

We fail to understand why the Amer- 
ican Association persists, as it did last 
year, in keeping the Association a purely 
local affair. We have thousands of 
breeders in other states who should have 
as much right in New York as foreign- 
ers have, -and, as we have pointed out 
before, New York can not be popular 
with the other states so long as it sends 
hundreds of thousands of dollars abroad 
annually for game and refuses to permit 
our readers to get the good prices for 
the food they produce. 

We regret much that we did not see 
Mr. Titcomb when he was in New York. 
He is one of the best state game officers 
in the United States, and we are told 
that he said Vermont could (and would, 
if permitted) send a lot of venison and 
game birds, properly identified, to the 
New York market, and that this would 
result in a much larger production of 
game than there is at present. 

We still hope the legislature will show 



THE GAME BREEDER 



19 



same common sense in dealing with this 
matter and we hope if it don't the next 
one will have a different political com- 
plexion. The people in New York who 
would like to eat the abundant game 
produced by our readers and who will 
willingly pay good prices for it should 
take notice that their representatives at 
Albany are being advised not to let them 
eat most desirable foods produced 
throughout the country and to compel 
them to dine almost exclusively on cold 
storage game from abroad — nonsense ! 
Nonsense ! Nonsense ! Rampant ! 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

The Game Breeder: 
Your paper is fine. 
Massachusetts. A. S. Pierce. 

A Good Sign. 

Game Breeder : 

Inclosed I send money for advertise- 
ment. I find some of your advertisers 
don't have what they advertise. 

Michigan. A. S. Cooper. 

[Several of our readers have written that 
they found our advertisers were sold out. This 
is a good sign. Many advertisers have writ- 
ten us to say that they were well pleased with 
this result. Some, in ordering their adver- 
tising discontinued, say that they do not wish 
to answer letters simply to say they have 
nothing more to sell. The game breeding in- 
dustry certainly is booming. — Editor Game 
Breeder.] 

California Tight? Too Bad! Too Bad! 

Editor Game Breeder: 

Aside from the pheasants this is one 
of the tightest States in the United 
States. We have no right to a place 
among the game-farming States. 

California. G. E. D. 

[The rapidity with which subscribers to The 
Game Breeder have been coming and also some 
unsolicited advertisements led us to believe 
that California was quite a good State for the 
game breeder's industry. If the State game 
officers are guilty of any attempts to strangle 
a food producing industry the fact should be 
generally known. We will help investigate this 
subject; all readers should help. If there is 
any wrongdoing, bouncing is the remedy, no 
matter what the politics of the commissioners 
are. We don't know what they are. We don't 
care what they are. There are certain agri- 
cultural interests and certain trade interests, 
including the hotel men's organizations and 



some others which take an interest in food 
producing and when the word is quietly passed 
by organized game breeders we are sure quite 
a few people will vote right. Let us always 
be sure we are right and then move rapidly. — 
Editor.] 

Pheasant Breeders' Law Works Well. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

Our pheasant breeders' law seems to 
be working satisfactorily although we 
will be in a better position to speak 
authoritatively regarding it after the 
season closes. As you will note it is 
quite broad since it authorizes the li- 
censee or any person having his consent 
to kill birds when ready for marketing 
Informally the term propagation has 
been interpreted to mean that land 
owners or lessees who have protected 
and cared for the birds to such extent 
as to insure safety and increase are 
propagating within the spirit of the law 
at least. I am inclined to think it will 
work satisfactorily and become popular, 
affording opportunity for some shoot- 
ing. John C. Speaks, 

Chief Game Warden, Ohio. 

[Duck breeding, quail breeding and laws 
encouraging the breeding of all species work 
well in States where they have been tried. 
There are, however, comparatively few places 
where it is legal to sell the quail and grouse 
and the breeders can not supply stock birds, 
being sold far ahead and having long waiting 
lists. Ohio is a good State for prairie grouse, 
quail ruffed grouse and wild turkeys. It should 
not be criminal to produce these. — Editor.] 

Editor Game Breeder : 

We have issued no licenses in this 
Province for the breeding of game birds 
and animals, for the very good reason 
that our system of protection is such, 
that the game supply is well maintained 
on the natural breeding grounds of our 
game birds as well as our fish and birds. 
Moreover, the Government of the Do- 
minion maintains a certain number of 
fish hatcheries in this Province. 

We may issue licenses very shortly for 
the farming of deer, not because this 
game is becoming any scarcer, but in or- 
der to increase if possible the market 
supply of venison and so to assist in re- 
ducing the cost of living. 

The only permits for breeding pur- 



20 



THE GAME BREEDER 



poses which we have issued as yet are 
for the raising in captivity of foxes and 
other fur-bearing animals. 

I send you by this mail a copy of a 
booklet which I wrote some time ago on 
this subject and also a copy of the last 
annual report of this Department. 

E. T. D. Chambers. 

Quebec, Canada. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

I heard considerable shooting, mostly 
black powder, yesterday morning and 
evening, and again this morning, and I 
feel certain it was at ducks, as quite a 
lot of black and wood ducks were 
hatched in ponds near here. I have ad- 
vocated the abolition of spring shooting 
for forty years, but now the Federal 
authorities have cut off a month of our 
season when ducks were growing more 
abundant every year; then they fail ut- 
terly to enforce the law, thus permitting 
the ignorant and lawless to shoot while 
the intelligent (as to game laws) and 
law-abiding get left. 

The farmers not being permitted to 
sell, trespassers making life unpleasant, 
even dangerous, it is to their advantage 
to permit as little game to breed as pos- 
sible ; to have as little cover and food as 
possible. 

A Letter From the Dean. 

Charles Hallock, writing from Wash- 
ington, D. C, to express his regrets at 
not being able to attend the dinner of 
The Game Conservation Society, pre- 
dicts that the game breeders soon will be 
numbered by the hundred thousand, 
"now that the more game campaign seems 
to have won with flying banners." The 
dean pointed out the mountains of poli- 
tics and prejudice we would have to 
cross, in an interesting letter, when he 
endorsed the movement at the start and 
American sportsmen, who wish to see 
field sports perpetuated, are much in- 
debted to Hallock, as we often have 

pointed out. 

♦ 

GOOD WORK. 

We thought so well of Mr. Job's book, 
"The Propagation of Wild Birds," that 



we sent out about 2,500 special letters 
to members of the Game Conservation 
Society and clubs associated with it in the 
good work of producing "more game." 
This is something the Game Conserva- 
tion Society never has done before ex- 
cept for its own publications and we 
are pleased to observe that our members 
have purchased many copies of the book. 
Mr. Job is the head of a new depart- 
ment of the National Association of 
Audubon Societies which takes a great 
interest in game preserving and the 
amendment of the game laws so as to en- 
courage this profitable production of the 
wild food birds. 



A Good Book. 



The National Association of Audubon 
Societies has sent us an attractive little 
book on "How to Attract and Protect 
Wild Birds," written by v Martin Hiese- 
mann and translated by Emma S. Buch- 
heim. 

This is an excellent book describing 
the system of Baron Von Berlepsch, 
who applied the gamekeepers' methods 
(of preserving game birds by the de- 
struction of their enemies providing 
plantations and covers for nesting and 
food) to all useful birds with great suc- 
cess. The book is illustrated with pic- 
tures of shelters, bird houses, etc. We 
can send it upon releipt of the price — 
50 cents. Postage, 6 cents. 



Venison for the Market. 

Venison is sold in the markets of 
Maine and some other States. Venison 
produced in New York is sold in the 
New York markets. Venison from for- 
eign countries is sold in New York, but 
venison from Maine, Pennsylvania, New 
Jersey, Vermont and all the other States 
which have an abundance of venison 
can not be sold in New York. 

Many members of The Game Con- 
servation Society outside of New York 
now have hundreds of elk and deer but 
they cannot market their food in the best 
market, New York City. We invite 
the attention of The New York Conser- 
vation Commissioner and the Legislature 



THE GAME BREEDER 



21 



to the absurd and outrageous situation. 
How long will the State Conservation 
Commissioner be compelled to admin- 
ister nonsense? Should a State game 
officer be compelled to prevent the in- 
dustrious producers of food in other 
States from feeding the people of New 
York? Should hundreds of thousands 
of dollars be sent abroad annually for 
game when American game farmers in 
other States are ready to supply the 
food? 

What has become of the provision in 
the United States Constitution which 
says the citizens of the several States 
shall have the same privileges and im- 
munities? How about this, Mr. Game 
Conservation Commissioner? 



quiring that all such crabs under five 
inches from tip of spike to tip of spike 
be thrown back in the water. 



The Partridge as a Fighter. 

Editor Outdoor Life: 

Last fall while hunting deer I was 
waiting at the edge of a small clearing 
for a buck to appear when I noticed a 
male partridge coming towards me. He 
did not notice me till I moved; then he 
seemed to get mad and ruffled up his 
feathers and, clucking, came towards me 
showing fight. To see what his real in- 
tentions were I started to move away, 
and, evidently thinking he had me bluffed 
he ran after me and chased me for about 
thirty yards, clucking viciously all the 
while. Then believing that he had run 
me off, he went into the thick under- 
brush. — A. A. Thomas, Minnesota, in 
Outdoor Life. 



CRABS. 



Crab life in Delaware will be con- 
served, if Daniel Burton, formerly dep- 
uty collector of internal revenue can have 
his way. He has pointed out that every 
year there is in that State a shameful 
waste of crab life and that it is doing 
great financial injury, especially to com- 
munities which border upon the leading 
crab-producing waters. The same trou- 
ble is being experienced in Virginia. In 
this last named State the legislature is 
asked to pass a law looking to the pro- 
tection of the egg-bearing mother, by 
providing a closed season for the sponge 
crab, and of the small hard crab by re- 



PINIONING. 

When birds are only a few weeks old 
they are easily pinioned by cutting off the 
last joint of one wing. A thread should 
be tied above the cut to prevent the loss 
of blood. When the birds are old the 
ligature should be made with care since 
there will be a greater loss of blood if 
the work is not properly done. Mr. 
Job well says one had better see it done 
by an experienced person before attempt- 
ing it. 

♦ 

There is much land which" can be 
bought for a few dollars in Rhode Is- 
land but it is dear at any price under 
existing laws. Similar lands can be 
purchased in Massachusetts for similar 
prices and they are worth ten times as 
much because there is more freedom in 
Massachusetts than there is in Rhode 
Island. We would advise Rhode Is- 
land farmers either to move or to have 
the laws, which provide for arrests for 
food producing amended. 



Birds May Not Be Brought 

Into This State from 

the South. 

To the Editor of The New York Times : 
Under the State conservation law 
(formerly known as the forest, fish and 
game law) the open season for the tak- 
ing of all game birds, such as quail, 
pheasants, grouse and partridge, closed 
on Dec. 31, 1915, with the exception of 
wild ducks, on which the season is open 
for the taking until Jan. 10, 1916, with 
possession until Jan. 15, 1916. 

It appears, however, that the season is 
open in many of the Southern States — 
North Carolina, South Carolina and 
Georgia — where quail, grouse, partridge, 
pheasants and wild turkeys may be taken 
up to March 15. Many of the residents 
of this city are now going down on shoot- 
ing trips, and are bringing back to this 
State the species of game on which our 
season is closed. The result has been 



22 



THE GAME BREEDER 



that our game protectors have had to 
seize the game thus brought into this 
State, in addition to which the party- 
bringing the game into this State .is 
guilty of a violation of the State law for 
having such birds in his possession dur- 
ing our closed season. 

There is no possible way in which to 
bring into this State any of the game 
birds on which our season is closed at 
the present time, even though it is lawful 
to kill and export the same in the State 
where taken. Already many prominent 
people of this city have settled with the 
Conservation Commission for violation 
of this provision of our law. 

The legality of this law has been up- 
held by a case which was carried to the 
Supreme Court of the United States — 
Hasterberg vs. Silz, 211, U. S., 31. 

It will, therefore, behoove every one 
going South to understand that no game 
birds can be brought into this State at 
the present time. on which our season is 
closed. In the case of ducks, geese and 
brant, the same prohibition will apply 
after Jan. 10, 1916. 

Under the law game seized is presented 
to various public institutions, and al- 
ready donations have been made to the 
Presbyterian Hospital, Roosevelt Hospi- 
tal, Polyclinic Hospital, Ophthalrhic 
Hospital, Salvation Army, Lincoln Hos- 
pital, Volunteer Hospital, St. John's 
Home, St. Malachy's Home, and as fur- 
ther game is seized it will be distributed 
to other institutions. 

Edmund Gallagher, 

Division Chief. 



The young son of the family, who 
had been out to luncheon at a little 
friend's house, was asked by his mother 
on his return whether he had been a 
good boy. He hesitated a moment, then 
answered, "Yes." 

"You don't seem to be very sure about 
the matter," said the mother. 

"What did you do?" 

"Oh, I just spilled my chop in my 
lap," he replied. 

"Did you apologize to Mrs. Brown?" 

"Yes," he nodded. 

"Tell mother what you said when 
you apologized." 

"Oh," . came the quick response, "I 
said, 'Excuse me, but that's what always 
happen to tough meat.' " 



We placed several good keepers in posi- 
tions recently and have good reports 
about them. Good men are getting 
scarce as the game breeding industry 



grows. 



Chauncey Thomas, in Outdoor Life, 
says: "The Dardanelles is the' only 
place in the world where a strait beats 
four kings." 



OUTINGS AND INNINGS. 

Two suburban gardeners were swear- 
ing vengeance on cats. "It appears to 
me," one said, "that they seem to pick 
out your choicest plants to scratch out 
of the ground." "There's a big yellow 
tomcat," the other said, "that fetches my 
plants out and then sits and actually de- 
fies me." "Why don't you hurl a brick 
at him ?" asked the first speaker. "That's 
what makes me mad," was the reply. "I 
can't. He gets on top of my greenhouse 
to defy me." — Kansas City Star. 



OUR FEATHERED GAME 

A manual on American Game 
Birds with- shooting illustrations in 
color, and bird portraits of all 
American Game Birds. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of The Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



Our Big Game 

A manual on the big game of 
North America with pictures of all 
big game animals. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of the Game Breeder ' 



THE GAME BREEDER 23' 



OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS 

the new york;times; IH 

r."^? "The subject is the development of a new crop — a flesh crop which has especial 
timeliness in view of the general exhaustion of our food supply. Mr. Huntington dis- 
cusses in the most practical manner the restoration of this crop of feathered game, 
and from the standpoint both of the sportsman and the market gunner, wild ducks, 
it seems, can be raised as easily and cheaply as domesticated duck?, and with 
equally excellent financial results. The way to do this is described with estimates 
of cost and citation of experience abroad, where the deficiency of food supply has 
led to the discovery and elaboration of many remedies to which we have not yet 
been forced. Mr. Huntington's book is illustrated with photographs, interesting 
alike to naturalists and breeders." ; 

^WILLIAM BREWSTER 

"'Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is obviously an able, comprehensive and very 
interesting treatise on a subject which has hitherto received but little attention from 
writers, especially in America, and concerning which naturalists, as well as sports- 
men, will, I am sure, be glad to be thus credibly and pleasingly informed." 

:the LOCKPORT UNION-SUN 1 

" Mr. Huntington has given to the American people an admirable treatise on the 
practical methods of making these splendid and desirable birds profitably plentiful. 
Ponds, streams and waste lands which do not pay the meagre taxes upon them can 
be utilized and be made to yield both handsome profits and good sport. This 
American authority on wild game tells the farmers and land owners of this country 
how to do it." 

CHARLES HALLOCK 

" The wild fowl book is valuable, clearsighted and scholastic. It is a direct 
appeal to sportsmen of common sense and generous behavior, and they will readily 
absorb its comprehensive pages and act accordingly— and live thereby." 

;dr. r. w. shufeldt 

" I have enjoyed the treat in my reading of this book from frontispiece to finish 
and I wager anybody else will enjoy it. . . . The author has placed every sports- 
man, every naturalist and a great many other citizens of other callings squarely under 
obligations to him. The book is a direct and logical argument setting forth the 
means for the preservation in the future of our wild fowl and waders. . . . The 
illustrations are judiciously selected, interesting and materially add to the value of 
the volume." 

A. A. HILL 

" This is not only a readable book, but it is important in an economic sense, and 
it will especially appeal to all who are interested in the conservation of wild life, and 
especially our game birds." 

AUTOMOBILE DEALER AND REPAIRER _ 

" If the advice of Dwight W. Huntington, pioneer and apostle of the movement 
in this country for a rational game protection and conservation, be acted upon, the 
time is coming speedily when game will be as cheap as beef or mutton. At present, 
after fifty years of legal protection, we have no game to amount to anything save in 
the more remote sections. . . . The book is not only instructive in an economic 
sense, showing how to make wild duck preserves safe and attractive, how to get 
stock and eggs and the food required, but is delightful reading for all. The author 
of ' Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is doing a great public service in his campaign 
for more game." 

Our Wtld Fowl and Waders will be sent to any address in the United States 
or Canada with The Game Breeder for one year upon receipt of $2.00. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY 

150 NASSAU STREET, N. Y." 



24 THE GAME BREEDER 



Game Breeders' Supplies 



WIRE - COOPS - TRAPS 

Wire 

For Deer Parks, Rearing Fields and Kennels 

Coops and Hatching Boxes 

Traps 

For Ground and Winged Vermin 

Egg Turners, Egg Boxes for Shipping 

And all Appliances for Game Farms and Preserves 



I shall be pleased to correspond with game breeders 
who wish to purchase wire, coops, traps or any appli- 
ances for the game farm and preserve. 

Special advice given to all contemplating the game 
breeders' industry. 



F. T. OAKES 

Room 622 
150 Nassau Street New York, U. S. A. 

I do not sell live deer and game birds, or eggs 






THE GAME BREEDER 



25 



THE PORTAGE HEIGHTS GAME FARM 

ROBERT J. McPHAIL, HeadlKeeper 

Portage Heights, AKron, Ohio 

Ring-Necked Pheasants Eggs For Sale 

For delivery prior to May^1 5, $25.00 per hundred For delivery after May 15, $20.00 per hundred 

$3.00 per dozen 

All our pheasant hens are mated with imported cocks. 

Distributors of PHEASANT GERMICIDE for the United States. A COOP of 15 CHICKS, one day old, with 
HEN, COOP and FEED and GERMICIDE enough to rear to 6 weeks old, including instructions, for $13.00 



J. R. GAMMETER, 



Portage Heights, Akron, Ohio 



Wild Turkey Eggs 

NEARLY EGGS, $15.00 per dozen 
Later, $12.00 per dozen 

These eggs are [from] true" 5 , Wild Turkeys. Orders 
will be filled in] k the][order in which they are received. 
Early orders for Jtwo or more dozen eggs will be] ac- 
cepted at the rate of $12.50 per dozen. I also have a 
few extra fine gobblers for sale, write for prices. 

MARY C. WILKIE 



BEAVERDAM 



VIRGINIA 







THE AMATEUR TRAINER 

By Ed. F. Haberlein 

A practical trainer of over 30 years' experience, whose 
system is up to date and stands unequaled. 

Neil) Ediiion Just Out. Illustrated. 
A plain, practical and concise, yet thorough guide 
in the art of training, handling and the correcting 
of faults of the bird dosr subservient to the gun 
afield. Written especially for the novice, but 
equally valuable to the experienced handler. By 
following the instructions plainly given, every 
shooter possessed of a little common sense and 
patience can train his own dogs to perfection. 
Paper cover, $1.00; best full cloth binding and gold 
embossed, $1.50. Address 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 


Mallard Eggs 

Mallard Duck Eggs by the dozen or 

hundred. Our stock has free 

range and are flyers. 


Buckstaff Farm 

Oshkosh - Wisconsin 



26 THE GAME BREEDER 



STONY LONESOME GAME FARM 

Mallard Ducks and 
Mongolian Pheasants 

We offer for immediate delivery (limited number) of 

Mallard Ducks and Mongolian Pheasants 

and will take - orders for eggs, delivery in the spring. 

ADDRESS 

129 Front Street, New York City, 

or JOHN FOSTER, West Hartland, Connecticut 



PHEASANTS, DUCKS AND EGGS 

Deer And Other Live Game 

FOR SALE, a superb lot of Golden, Silver and Amherst pheasants just 
right for. breeding this spring and summer. 

I am now booking orders for eggs of the following varieties: Mon- 
golian, Ringneck, Chinese, Golden, Silver, Amherst and Reeves. 

Wood Duck, Mallard and Gray Call Duck eggs. 

All the eggs I ship are guaranteed to be from non-related, pure 
bred, stroug, healthy birds, correctly mated ; all eggs are guaranteed not to 
be over, three days old when they leave my farm. 

I also manufacture a full line of special foods for the successful raising 
of young pheasants and wild water fowl, also for feeding the old birds 
all the year 'round ; write for prices. 

WALLACE EVANS GAME FARM, ST. CHARLES, ILL 

Largest and most successful breeders of pheasants, 
wild water fowl, deer, etc., in the world. 

In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.*' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



27 




■v^.v- 




Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
Partridges and Pheasants. 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I aarry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
S?7?if^? n8 »? f ^ n ^ nd T have fine lot of ,he beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES. PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
» thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have 60 acres 
ot land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere— it will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 80 mile6 from Philadelphia. 




Department V. 



WE J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 



28 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Wild Water Fowl 

"Our Specialties." 

Wood Ducks, Mandarins, Wild Black 
Mallards for stocking game preserves. 
Safe delivery guaranteed. 500 Can- 
ada Wild Geese, $8.00 to $10.00 per 
pair. Australian, South American, 
Carolina Swans. 200 trained English 
Decoy Ducks, guaranteed Callers and 
Breeders, $5.00 per pair. Eggs, 15 for 
$2.00. Mallards and Canada Geese 
must be bought NOW to breed this 
Spring. For prices of other wild fowl 
apply to 

WHEALTON WILD WATER-FOWL FARMS 
Chincoteague Island, Virginia 




FISHEL'S FRANK 



The Best in 
Pointers 

Puppies, Broken Dogs 

and Brood Bitches, by 

Champion Comanche 

Frank, Fishers Frank 

and Champion Nicholas 

R. 

Write me your wants, please- 

U. R. FISHEL 
Box 35 HOPE, IND. 



M. G. and F. G. L 

Can you guess it? 



Wild Mallard Eggs 

From Select Stock: 

$25.00 per 100 
3.50 per \ 3 




From Utility Stock: 

$15.00 per J 00 
2.00 per J 3 

Clyde B. Terrell 
Oshkosh - Wisconsin 



Wc Offer For 
Immediate Delivery 

Silver, Goldens, Ringnecks, Lady Amhersts' 
Reeves, Elliotts, Mongolians, Swinhoes.Versicolors, 
Impeyans, Manchurian Eared and Melanotus 
Pheasants. We are now booking' orders for eggs 
for Spring and Summer delivery of any of the above 
varieties. We quote Ringneck eggs $3.50 per 
dozen, $25.00 per hundred ; Green head mallard 
eggs $3.50 per dozen, $25.00 per hundred. We also 
offer for sale Single Comb Buff and Blue Orping- 
tons, Rhode Island Reds, Japanese Silkies and 
Longtails. Wild Turkeys. Blue, White Japanned and 
Specifier Peafowls, as well as the following Ducks : 
Greenhead and black mallard, pintail, redhead, 
gadwall, wood, mandarin and Formosan teal, 
shovelers, baldpate and Blue Bill and green wing 
teal. 

WANTED 

White and Java Peafowls. In Pheasants, any 
of the trajopans. firebacks, cheer, sommering, 
Elliotts, white crested Kalij, Peacocks. Anderson's 
Lineatus, Golden Eye, Greater Scaup, Old 
Squaw, Butterball and Gargany Ducks. Also Ring 
Teal. In writing quote number, sex and lowest 
cash price. 

Send 30 cents in stamps for our new 1916 color- 
type catalogue of pheasants and rearing of pheas- 
ants. If you do not like it return in 48 hours after 
receiving, and your money refunded ; and if you 
make a purchase of us to the amount of $5.00 you 
can deduct price of catalogue. 



CHILES & 

Mount Sterling, 



CO. 

Kentucky 



THE GAME BREEDER 29 



CHAMPION MISSISSIPPI SPORT 

All American 
Champion, 1916 

)k Runner Up 
™ 11915 



[26379 F.D.S.B. 




FEE $30.00 

Having had a number of requests to breed to Sport by gentlemen wjho want bird dogs, I have decided to allow 
him 15 bitches this spring. Sport is a handsome orange and white setter of medium size and a five time winner. 
He is a young, vigorous dog that is sure to please those who want to develop bird work and stamina in their stock. 
He finds and handles more birds perfectly than any young dog I have seen, and in every race he has been in he 
has proved that he is a real bird dog. Sport is not only a field trial champion, but is a delightful dog to shoot 
over, as he is thoroughly broken and never seems to tire. His breeding is first class. Send for card. 

Ship Bitches to P. C. ELLIS, BOONEVILLE, MISS. 
After April 12th, to R. H. SIDWAY, 210 FRANKLIN ST., BUFFALO, NEW YORK. 



PHEASANTS 

JUST WHAT YOU NEED 

Large, splendid Mongolian Cocks to cross on your small 
Ring Necks, to increase their size and stamina. 

Will make a special price while they last of $5.00 each 
or $50.00 a dozen for these "birds. They are all pure 
selected brood stock and are in perfect condition. 

Safe Arrival Guaranteed, 

Ring Neck and Mallard Eggs, $25.00 per Hundred until May 15th. 
Mongolian Eggs, $40.00 per Hundred until May 15th. 

RIVER LAWN FARM 

RALPH H. SIDWAY 

21 Franklin Street BUFFALO, IN. Y. 



30 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



LIVE GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE PHOENIX FOWL 
Eggs for sale: several varieties. S V. REEVES, 114 
E. Park Ave., Haddonficld. N. J. 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country Black and White 
Swans. Wild Ducks, etc , for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

WILD TURKEVS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything- in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet witn order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (lot) 

BRED FEMALE MI\K, SKUNKS, FOXES. OPOS- 
SUMS Pigeons, dogs. Particulars free. TARMAN, 
Box G, Quincy, Penna. 

FOR SALE BUKFALO AND ELK IN CAR LOAD 
lots or single. Deer, Antelope. Beaver. Mink, Mountain 
Lion, Pheasants and Game Birds. Eggs in season. 
KENDRTCK PHEASANTRIES, Coronado Building, 
Denver. Colorado. 7-/6 

FOR SALE- WILD MALLARD DUCKS. $r.j 5 EAC«, 
3 for $3.50. Eggs for sale in season. A. J. APPLEBY, 
Mgr., Cherry Farm, Chester, N. J. 

5 VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. Wild Mallards, 
Wild Geese and game. Fourteen varieties of stand- 
ard Poultry, including Turkeys. Also Elk. List free. 
G. H. HARRIS. Taylorville. 111. 

GOLDEN AND ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANT 

eggs for hatching. May to August. W.S.ALLISON. 

Merrimacport, Mass 7-16 

PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW, 
ing prices : Mallards. $3.00 per pair. Pintails, $2.50 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $4.00 per pair. Blue Wirg Teal, 
$300 per pair. Also retheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for oropa. 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN, 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 

FOR SALE-PAIR GOLDEN, PAIR SILVER PHEAS- 

ants, $5.00 each this month. Mallard ducks, $5 00 per 

pair, eggs $2.00 per dozen. Stamp for inquiry. A S. 

COOPER, Howell. Mich. 3-16 

GOLDEN PHEASANTS— $10.00 A PAIR. EGGS 30c 

each. FRAN KLIN J. PITTS, 14 Webster St., Taunton, 

Mass. 7-16 



SAN LORENZO GAME FARM — BREEDER OF 
all kinds of pheasants; eggs in season ; also birds 
for sale at all times Visitors welcome. Write for 
price list. Mrs. S. MATTHI ESSEN, San Lorenzo, 
Alameda Co., California. 7-16 



WILD MALLARD DECOYS— RAISED ON LICENSED 
Wisconsin game farm. Birds $1.50 each, eggs $1.50 
per 12. Going fast, don't delay. E. G. SHOWERS, 
Onalaska, Wis. 

FOR SALE-ENGLISH KINGNECK PHEASANTS, 
hens, $5.50 per pair— eggs for hatching $25.00 for 100, 
$3.00 per setting. MRS. H. B. PALMER, Mt. Freedom 
Ruad, Morristown, N. J. 



RINGNECK PHEASANTS - 
$2.00. Eggs $2.50-15. $15.00, 
4, Gait, Ont. 



- $3.50 Pair, extra Hens, 
100. A. E. BEYER, R. R. 



FOR SALE — WILD MALLARD DUCK, PEKIN 
Duck Mammoth Bronze Turkey Eggs. Limited stock, 
at $2.00 dozen. Also several very high bred, registered 
English Setter male pups. Wanted to buv. 100 gray 
squirrel INGERSOLL, Wah-wah-taysee Lodge, Buffalo, 
Minn. 



GAME BIRDS WANTED 



WANTED— MONGOLIAN AND RINGNECK PHEAS- 
ANTS and deer for breeding Also cub bear Give 
descripiion and prices. CLARE WILLARD, Allegany. 
New York. 

WANTED — I M ME DIAL ELY, A DOZEN HEN 
pheasants in good order. Address G. P. F., 401 N. Pearl 
St., Albany, N. Y. 

PHEASANTS WANTED. ONLY RARE VARIETIES 

such as Tragopans, Manchurian, Firebacks, Impeyans, 

etc. Kindly quote price. A.J MERLE, Alameda, Calif. 

WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX, 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants. Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state ptice and number. R. A. CHILES 
&'CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

WANTED— FANCY AVIARY PHEASANTS, RING- 
necks, peacocks, partridges, quail, prairie chickens, 
wood and mandarin ducks. Quote prices. ROBERT 
HUTCHINSON, Littleton, Colo 

DEER WANTED-Wanted, one pair of adult fallow deer. 
State price. A C. C, care of The Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



DOGS 



NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS. IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
English bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds. American fox- 
hounds, lion, cat, deer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. All 
trained. Shipped on trial. Satisfacfion guaranteed or 
money refunded. Purchaser to decide. Fifty page highly 
illustrated catalogue, 5 c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



31 



GAME EGGS 



RING NECK PHEASANT EGGS FROM CHOICE 

stock. Order now for early delivery. $2 50 per setting 

of 15 eggs. EDWARD W. DOLAN, Worthington. 

Minn. 5-16 

WILD MALLARD DUCK EGGS— APRIL TO MAY 
15, iqi6, $15.00 per hundred May 16 to July 5, 1916, 
$12 00 per hunded. Safely packed (send draftl. Order 
at once. First come, first served (no limit, no discount). 
C. BREMAN CO., Danville, Illinois. 

ORDERS FOR RINGN'ECK PHEASANT EGGS FOR 
season igi6 — Fine healthy stock — Birds not related — 
Price $3 50 for 15 DR. HOLMAN, Attleboro, Mass. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE; STRICTLY FRESH 
and fertile. I am now booking orders for spring and 
summer. Amherst, Golden, Silver. GRAY PHEAS- 
ANTRIES, Ward Street, Orange, New Jersey. 

EGGS FROM R1NGNECK PHEASANTS, MALLARD 
ducks. All the popular breeds of high grade chkkens. 
MILL ROAD POUT TRY FARM, Apple Grove 
Virginia. ■ 5 _/ 6 

PHEASANT, FOR TWELVE EGGS. Golden, Silver, 
$4 ; Amherst $8 ; Ringneck $3 ; Rose Comb Buff Leg- 
horns $1 for 15. Reliable Pheasant Standard Colored 
Plate 75c. T. A. WENDENHALL, Greenville. Ohio. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCH I NG-Chinese ring- 
neck $3.00 per dozen. $20.00 per hundred; Golden $4.00 
per dozen, Silver $5.00 per dozen, Reeves $7.00 oer dozen. 
OREGON BIRD & PHEASANT FARM, Beaverton, 
Oregon. 

RINGNECK, SILVER AND GOLDEN PHEASANT 
eggs for sale. Pure stock and fresh eggs only. Reason- 
able. W. L. EDISON, Mornstown, N. J. 

FOR SALE, SILVER AND MONGOLIAN PHEASANT 
Eggs, also Japanese silkies eggs. DOLY'S PHEAS- 
ANTRY, Marmot, Oregon. 

MALLARD EGGS. FROM SELECT WINNERS, 
$3.50 per 13, $25.00 per hundred ; from utility stock, $2 00 
per 13, $15.00 per hundred Early eggs bring better re- 
sults Enter order now. CLYDE B. TERRELL, Natur- 
alist. Dept. P2. Oshkosb, Wis ■ 

RINGNECK PHEASANTS. EGGS FOR SALE AT 
$2.00 a dozen. ISAAC SPENCER, 10 Wayne Ave. 
Ipswich, Mass. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

"PHEASANT FARMING," AN ILLUSTRATED 
practical booklet on pheasant rearing, postpaid, fifty 
cents Circular, all necessary pheasant equipment free. 
SIMPSON'S PHEASANT FARM, Corvallis, Oregon. 

WHITE'S PRESERVE— WILD CELERY AND ALL 
kinds of wild duck food, plants and seeds. Also enter- 
tain sportsmen. Waterlily, Currituck Sound, Ncrtb Caro- 
lina. 

BLACK SIBERIAN HARE:— THE DEMAND FOR 
fuller information concerning this wonderlul fur-bear- 
ing animal is so great that we are forced to publish a 
larger booklet to answer the many questions our little 
bookie' brought from our customers. 

We are deeply indebted to M Shacknoe. Naturalist, 
late of Siberia, for the most of the information in this 
last and larger booklet, especially the habits of the animal 
in the wild state. Booklet 25 cents SIBERIAN HARE 
COMPANV. Hamilton, Canada. 

WILD DUCKS' NATURAL FOODS Will attract 
them, f hese foods collected, examinations made, plant- 
ings planned and superintended. Write for free infor- 
mation. CLYDE B TERRELL, Specialist on the Natural 
Foods of Wild Ducks, Dept. Pi, Oshkosh, Wis. 

BLACK SIBERIAN HARE; $10 per pair, $15 per trio. 
JOHN W. TALBOT, South Bend, Indiana. 



GAMEKEEPERS 



SITUATION WANTEU-HEAD GAMEKEEPER OR 
Superintendent of large estate or game preserve. Very 
capable man to show sport. Thoroughly experienced 
rearing pheasants, partridge, quail and wild ducks. 
Management of incubators hatching pheasant and duck 
eggs. Also breeding, training and handling high class 
shooting dogs. Excellent trapper, competent manager. 
Reference present employer. GAMEKEEPER, 157 East 
69th St., New York. 

A MARRIED MAN, EXPERIENCED IN RAISING 

pheasants, ducks, geese and poultry; can equip plant 
also ex - d in Garden and fruit; .prelei close to large 
city ; can furn... oest of reference as 10 ability. Address 
S J., Game Breeder. 150 Nassau St., N. Y. C. 

A MARRIED MAN, THOROUGHLY EXPERI- 
ENCED in breed ng pheasants and other wild game, 
training dogs, etc , a man who can meet the public and 
conduct correspondence, yet one who Is not afraid of 
soiling his hands. Relerei.Cts required. R. K. N., care 
of The Game Breeder. 15° Nassau St.. N. Y. City. 

GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION, UNDER- 
stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 
this country. Address M. F. care of The Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau Street New Vork. 

WANTED-SOBER, INDUS TRIOUS. EXPERIENCED 
man to raise Pheasants and Turkeys. Will pay a moderate 
salary and liberal share of profits. Address giving full 
details of qualifications. CHAS. B. WOOD, Hadlyme, 
Conn. 

UNDERKEEPER— WANTED A GOOD MAN WHO 
thoroughly understands pheasant rearing, willing and 
obliging. Age aboui 24 years. Send full particulars of 
references to REARER, care of The Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St , New York City j-ib 



WANT ED- SITUATION 
As Superintendent or Manager on a game farm or 
preserve. Experienced in game and poultry breeding. 
Good reason for desiring change of location. Would 
take an interest in a game farm to breed game com- 
mercially. Address C. McM.. office of The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street. New York City. 



WANTED AT ONCE, EXPERIENCED GAME- 
KEEPER. Must understand a little gardening Wife 
could supervise bed linen. Houserooms in clubhouse. 
State experience and salary expected. Addrsss HOL- 
LAND FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION, Riverton, 
Connecticut. 



REAL ESTATE 



GAME BREEDING FARM WANTED 
Wanted to purchase or rent a small place in one 
of the Eastern States where game breeding is legal. 
A small farm with a pond and stream is desired. 
State price and location. M. A. C, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



$50.00 BUYS BUNGALOW (100x100) on 2000 acre pri- 
vate hunting and fishing Preserve in Vermont ladjoin- 
ing Adirondacksi. Pay $10.00 with application and $5.00 
monthly. Only desirable persons considered. Title guar- 
anteed. Daily mail. Round trip fare from New York City, 
$5.00. Will build three room bungalow with porch, run- 
ning water and other conveniences for $350.00 lor first 
25 accepted applicants. Address for particulars, COOKE, 
950 St. Harks Avenue. Brooklyn. New York. 

BUNGALOW FOR SALE OR RENT 

HAVE WELL BUILT BUNGALOW IV THE MOUN- 
tainsof Ulster Co., N.Y., 2 hours from N.Y.City and half- 
hour from Poughkeepsie. Bungalow contains 6 rooms, 
good artesian well and first-class outbuildings. Will rent 
furnished or unfurnished for thecommgsummer. Address 
E. DAYTON, 26 Bergen Ave., Jersey City, N.J. 

WANTED PARTNER— TO TAKE AN INTEREST 
in a deer park and preserve near New York. 150 acres 
fenced with eight foot fence, containing deer and an 
abundance of ruffed grouse Two trout streams and 
splendid water for wild duck breeding G B.. care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More G;»roe. M 



32 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Blue -Winged Teal — Green -Winged Teal 
and Other Wild Fowl 

For Sale, for stocking purposes only, a fine lot 
of Bine-winged and Green- winged Teal; also a few 
pin-tailed ducks and some wild bred mallards. These 
are legal birds, shipped with State Permit. They 
are exempt from game law restrictions and they can 
be shipped safely to all parts of the United States 
where game breeding is legal or where it is legal to 
have live birds in possession. 

For particulars and prices, write to 

GAME PRESERVER, Care of The Game Breeder 

150 Nassau Street New York, N. Y. 



Australian Doves 

And Other Stock 
For Sale 

GREEN WING DOVES' 
WONGA WONGA DOVES 
CRESTED BRONZE WING DOVES 

ZEBRA DOVES 

BLACK SWAN AND MANDARIN 

DUCKS 

Write for Prices 

HEGER & HARRIS 

1917 San Pablo Ave. 
OAKLAND - - - CALIFORNIA 



Rearing Pheasants 

In Small Enclosures 

Price, 20 Cents 

SEND for a practical treatise on Rear- 
ing Pheasants in Small Enclosures. 
Contains exact data and complete 
instructions for the construction of pens, 
coops and runs. Illustrations of pen, shel- 
ter shed, coop and run in complete form, 
and detached parts of coop and run, with 
all measurements clearly shown. 

Tells how to set the eggs and care for 
the birds from the day they are hatched 
until completely grown. 

A reliable and dependable formula for 
feeding through every stage of their exist- 
ence is presented. 

It contains nothing that has not been 
thoroughly and successfully tried out in 
actual practice. 

S. V. REEVES 

Haddonfield New Jersey 



GAME BIRDS 

TOR PROPAGATING PURPOSES 

Genuine Wild Mallards, Black Duck, Green-wing and Blue- 
wing Teal, Pintails, Gadwalls, Shovellers, Wood Duck, Widgeon, 
Red- heads, Blue-bills, also a few pairs of extra choice Canvas-backs 
and Ring-bills; Canadian, Greater and Lesser Snow, Ross, Brant, 
Hutchins, Cackling and Blue Geese, supplied for propagating 
purposes. Finest quality in the country. 

Golden, Silver, Amherst, Reeves Pheasants at reasonable prices. 
I also am booking orders for ring-neck Pheasants reared on my 
preserve for delivery in early fall. 

I also have rare land and waterfowl from all parts of the world. 
Prices quoted for the asking. 

JOHN HEYWOOD, Gardner, Mass. 

Farms for the Propagation of Wild Fowl. 



WILD COTTON-TAIL RABBITS 

WILLIAM A. LUCAS, Naturalist, WOODHAVEN, L. I., N. Y. 

I offer for immediate delivery 3000 Northern Cotton-Tail Rabbits. Legal 
animals for restocking State Game Refuges and Game Preserves. 

I guarantee rabbits to be in prime condition. Live arrival guaranteed. 
Order now for sure delivery, Correspondence invited. 

I offer also a fine lot of Ring-Necked Pheasants of prime quality for 
breeding purposes ; Bob-White Quail ; Wild Turkeys ; Reeves Pheasants ; 
Golden Pheasants ; Lady Amherst Pheasants ; China Ring-Necked Pheasants 
and Mongolian cross breeds. I also carry a full line of ornamental Land and 
Water Fowl. Order now for sure delivery. 

"Grey Wild Mallard Ducks a Specialty" 

Although my prices are higher than those of some competitors, I, however, 
deliver nothing that is not of prime quality, my expenses are therefore high, 
but my buyers have certain and good results. 

WILLIAM A. LUCAS - WOODHAVEN, L. I., NEW YORK 



r n 

PROFIT AND SATISFACTION 

lie in the number of poults that you rear. Thousands die 
before they are two weeks old — the result of innutritious food. 

IF YOU FEED 




SPRATI'S Game food 



AND 



Pheasant Meals 



you can reduce the percentage of mortality to a minimum and 
enhance the pleasure of game breeding 100%. 

SPRATT'S MANUFACTURE THE FOLLOWING GAME FOODS: 

SPRATT'S CHICGRA1N (Contains a choice assortment of care- 
fully blended grains and seeds mixed together according to a 
formula only known to ourselves). 

SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL No. 12 (For Pheasant, Partridge 
and Quail Chicks). 

SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL No. 5 (For young Pheasants). 

SPRATT'S MAXCO (The most nourishing food obtainable). 

SPRATT'S PRAIRIE MEAT "CR1SSEL" (Takes the place of 
Ants' Eggs and is a perfect substitute for insect life) . 

SPRATT'S WILD DUCK MEAL (The best Food for Ducklings). 

SPRATT'S WILD DUCK MANNA (A strong nourishing food). 



Send 25c. for "Pheasant Culture." 
"Poultry Culture " sent on receipt of 10c. 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

Newark, N. J. San Francisco St. Louis Cleveland Montreal 



MAH 12 1921 






No. 2 



A 



'« 



n(A 



• . 



REMINGTON 
UMC 



SIT in with any gathering of old stagers with the gun or 
rifle, and you can't help coming away impressed anew 
with the prestige of Remington UMC. 

Your American sportsman has the habit of setting a new 
pace for himself- demanding quicker, cleaner shooting at the 
traps and in the field — quick to see and take advantage of 
any betterment in arms and ammunition. 

Results on the target range, at the traps, in the duck blind 
or the big game country— that is the test. 

Look at the men at the traps— you find that more of them 
every day are shooting "Arrow" and "Nitro Club" Steel Lined 
Speed Shells. 

And the men buying rifles, shotguns, ammunition for Vaca- 
tion use — watch how many ask for — Remington UMC. 



In any city or town, ask for the dealer who sup- 
plies arms and ammunition to the majority of 
active sportsmen. You will be pointed to the 
dealer who displays the Red Ball Mark of Rem- 
ington UMC — the sign of Sportsmen's Head- 
quarters in every town. 

The Remington Arms Union Metallic Cartridge Co. 

Largest Manufacturers of Firearms 
and Ammunition in the World. 

Woolworth Building NEW YORK 



THE GAME BREEDER 



33 




'Th€ 

'Wild Turkey-] 

Its restoration, is. im 
portant because domes- 
tic turkeys are deci- 
mated by a di 




When Our Land Is Filled 
With Game 

A FEW years ago America was the greatest 
game country in the world. Our woods, 
our fields, our water-ways, were teeming 
with game birds. Wild turkeys, quail, grouse, 
ducks, were familiar sights — to the sportsman; on 
the table; and in city markets. 

These conditions should again prevail. They 
may successfully be brought about through game 
farming. 

Game farming does not necessarily require a large 
amount of land and involves little expense in time 
and money. The work in itself is intensely interest- 
ing and affords both profit and pleasure to those who 
indulge in it. I 

Results from Game Farming 

In the first place game birds of many kinds com- 
mand high prices in city markets. Their eggs are 
eagerly sought by* breeders. Secondly, if you are 
fond of hunting, the birds you raise will provide ex- 
cellent sport and food. Or if you prefer, and if you 
own large acreage, you may lease the privilege of 
shooting over your land. This does not mean that 
the sport of hunting, so far as the general public is 
concerned, will be restricted. On the contrary it 
will be increased; for game raised for sporting pur- 
poses cannot be closely confined in any given area. 

If you are interested in game farming from any standpoint, 
you should write for a booklet which takes up the subject in 
a broad way and gives much interesting and valuable informa- 
tion regarding it. 

The book is called "Game Farming for Profit and Pleas- 
ure." It is well worth reading. Write for a copy. Use 
the coupon below. 

Game Breeding Department, Room 204 

HERCULES POWDER COi 

Wilmington, Delaware 

Manufacturers of Explosives; Infallible and "E.C." 

Smokeless Shotgun Powders; L & R. Orange Extra 

Black Sporting Powder; Dynamite for farming. 



Game Breeding Department, Room 204 

Herculea Powder Company, Wilmington, Del. 





Gentlemen: — Please send me a copy of Game Farming for Profit and Pleasure. I am interested in tame breeding from 

the standpoint of. 

Very truly yours. 



3i 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

A Practical Book on the Breeding of Wild Fowl 
for Sport and for Profit 

With Numerous Illustrations. 

Contains chapters on the Preservation of Snipe and Woodcock. 

Many readers of the Game Breeder have bred thousands of Wild Ducks 
by following the instructions in this book. 



DUCK BREEDING IS PROFITABLE. 



PRICE, $1.50; Special Signed Edition, $2.00. 



THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, New York 



Heating and Cooking Stoves for 
Clubs and Cottages 



The Camp Cook Stove 

This is an ideal cook stove for the 
Mining, Lumber and Military 
Gamps; will work just as well in 
the open air as indoors. 

Construction Companies working 

arge gangs of men will find this 
well suited to their requirements.:. 




IRONSIDES 



STOVES 



Radnor Ranges 
Home Victor Ranges 
Victor Cook Dobule Oven 

Ranges 
Hotel Ranges 
Royal Victor Ranges 
No. 10 Ironsides t Cook 
Patrol Wood Stove 
No. 90 Ironsides 
Haddqn Ranges 



Index Heating Stoves 
Solar Kent Heating 



A FEW OF THE LEADING 

Home Victor Hot Water Stoves 

Farmer Girl Cook 

New H. A. Elm Double Heaters 

Vulcan Double Heaters Prompt Ranges 

Tropic Sun Heating Stoves Cozy Ranges 

Haddon Hercules Heating Stoves Victor Cook Ranges 

Ormond Ranges Loyal Victor Ranges 

No. 15 Hot Blast Heating Stoves .Victor Hotel Ranges 

Victor Gem Cook ' Elm Ranges 

Laundry Stoves Farmer Boy Cook Stoves 



FURNISHED - 

.Our Friend Cook Stoves - 
' Sejitry Wood Stoves 



Stoves I Home, Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Home Cellar Furnaces 
• Victor Cellar Furnaces ■-■ 
' Victor Solar CellarFurnaces 
JParmer's Furnaces and 

■ Cauldrons 



Manufactured by 



S. Y,REEVES, 45 N. 2nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



In -Wr^tijig-tQ advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



^•=v- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



35 



Teach Them To Shoot 

Don't corner all of the sport. Teach your brother, father 
or sister to shoot. Show them the fun they can have with 
a gun. Get them out to the 

Beginner's Day Shoots 

Last year these shoots were a striking success at every 
live gun club in the country. This June they will be bigger 
than ever with beautiful trophies for all of the winners. 

Fobs for the Men Spoons for the Women Cups for the Clubs 



A beautiful Sterling watch 
fob will be given to each 
man (beginner) making 
the best score at each 
Beginner's Day Shoot. 



A Sterling Silver spoon of 
artistic design will be 
given to each woman (be- 
ginner) making the best 
score at each shoot. 



The two clubs in each state 
having the largest number 
of beginners participating 
in each shoot will receive a 
beautiful silver loving cup. 



June is the Month 

Get ready now ! Any club in the country 
may hold a Shoot on any day or days in 
June. Get your members working. Have 
each one pledge himself to bring at least one 
beginner. Write at once for full details and 
conditions. 

TRAPSHOOTING DEPARTMENT 

£. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. 

WILMINGTON DELAWARE 

If you are a beginner write for a letter of introduction 
to the secretary of the nearest club hold- 
ing a Beginner's Day Shoot. 




First Prize 
to clubs 

Silver Loving^ 

Cup 9 inches 

high. 



Second Prize 
to clubs 

Silver Loving 

Cup TA inches 

high. 



36 THE GAME BREEDER 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field — An Open Market — Get Busy — Game Breeding 

Clubs — Massachusetts Behind the Times — Another Error — The "Mile 

High" — Echo Answers Why? — Game in the National Forests Fishing 

Licenses — Calling Out the Troops — A Better Way — A Pot Shot at Deer 
— One on the Editor. 

Quail Preserving - - - - - - D. W. Huntington 

Partridge Shooting in Hungary ... Capt. C. E. Radcliffe 

Hare Driving in Hungary .-..'-' - - - Capt. C, E. Radcliffe 

Breeding Canada Geese - - - - - - H. S. Little 

How I Got My Wild Blood - - - - - J. D. McClintic 

More Cat Tales Edward Howe Forbush 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves. 

Guinea Hens as Insect Eaters — The Watch Dog and the Owl — 

More About Duck Breeding — Care and Feed for Young Turkeys 

Importance of Range for Wild Turkeys A Mixed Ration for 

Pheasants. 

Editorials — At Last ! — Our Grouse and Quail — Partridges and Hares. 
Correspondence — Outings and Innings. 



To THE GAME BREEDER, 

150 Nassau Street, New York. 

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wish back numbers of the magazine to the first of the year. 



T he . Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter. July 9, 1915, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



VOLUME IX 



MAY, J9J6 
Co} 

SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 2 



An Open Market. 

The New York market is now open to 
sale of certain game produced by game 
breeders in the other States. It is a pity 
that only a few common species can 
come in but soon we will give the quail 
grouse and other game the same benefits 
now extended to pheasants, ducks and 
deer. 

Get Busy. 

Game breeders in all of the States 
should get busy. Game brings splendid 
prices in New York and there is a big 
demand. We shall publish market re- 
ports and prices from time to time and 
always we are glad to give our many 
readers information as to how and where 
to sell the game they produce. 
Game Breeding Clubs. 

Game Breeding Clubs, composed of 
sportsmen of moderate means, now can 
be safely organized everywhere. The 
sale of part of the game can be made 
to pay all or a good part of the running 
expenses. Our advice is to breed far 
more than you can possibly eat and to 
shoot some big bags for the people 
to eat at excellent prices. You can 
make the people friendly to sport and 
pay your running expenses. We hope 
some clubs will declare cash dividends. 
Massachusetts. 

The Massachusetts Commissioners 
have issued another very good Report — 
as usual. It opens with the statement: 
"Attention is again called to the peculi- 
arly favorable opportunities for inten- 
sive utilization of latent food-producing 
resources. It is reasonable to state that 
few departments of government reach so 
directly and intimately the vital inter- 



ests of all the people as does the depart- 
ment of fisheries and game, not alone as 
stimulating recreative and health-produc- 
ing sports, but even more by assisting in 
the annual production of important food. 
Fresh-water fish, birds and game are 
peculiarly responsive to correct methods 
of artificial propagation. Similarly, 
methods for increasing production must 
be applied to the salt-water fisheries and 
other natural resources of the common- 
wealth." 

The Massachusetts Commission long 
has been right in its ideas that all of the 
people should have game and fish to eat 
and there is abundant evidence in the 
report that the Commission still believes 
in the encouragement of game and fish 
breeding for sport and for profit. Many 
State game officers can learn much from 
Massachusetts. 

Behind the Times. 

California Fish and Game, describing 
the work of one of our members, Mr. 
Charles Shaw, who is rearing wild ducks 
on the Briggs ranch, says: "For many 
years past the preserves of Great Britain 
have reared thousands of wild fowl and 
used them to augment shooting, but little 
has been done in this direction in the 
United States." 

This is quite an error. Wonders have 
been performed in the United States. 
Many clubs now have thousands of 
hand-reared ducks and some of our 
members who have their own duck 
plants in other States had many ducks 
for sale last year and were disgusted be- 
cause they could only get 50 cents each 
for them in the local markets, while New 
York breeders were getting $3.00 and 
even $4.00 a brace for all the ducks they 



38 



THE GAME BREEDER 



wished to market. The writer reared 
one season several years ago, oyer 2,500 
mallards from- 170 stock birds. These r 
ducks were kept in a small inclosure sur- 
rounding an artificial pond. Members 
of the Game Conservation Society now 
sell hundreds of thousands of wild eggs 
every season and this year many thous- 
ands of eggs will be shipped to Cali- 
fornia and other Western States. 

Another Error. 

It is an error also to say, "for many 
years past the preserves of Great Britain 
have reared thousands of wild fowl and 
used them to augment shooting." Pheas- 
ants have been reared for many years 
but it is not so very long since it was 
believed to be impossible to rear wild 
ducks in England on account of their 
wildness and migratory habits. Now, 
however, nearly every country place in 
England has an abundance of wild 
ducks ; the people have plenty to eat and 
the prices are low. Hundreds of thous- 
ands, probably millions, of eggs are sold, 
the price usually being £2 per hundred. 
All these facts and others are fully re- 
cited in the book, "Our Wild Fowl and 
Waders," published by the Game Con- 
servation Society, price $1.50. We will 
send this book to California Fish and 
Game for educational purposes and for 
review, upon request — without charge, 
of course. The Society has a small fund 
for educational purposes and delights 
in promoting duck breeding and all other 
kinds of game breeding. 

A number of our California readers, 
besides Mr. Shaw, now have wild ducks. 
One reports a good sale of eggs under a 
permit from the Commission promptly 
issued. There have been some com- 
plaints that it took so long to get a per- 
mit that the eggs spoiled before they 
could be moved. This, if true, is as bad 
as holding quails until they become dis- 
eased and then deciding that they can 
not be imported. 

The "Mile High." 

The Rocky Mountain News says: 
Not long 1 since we commended an Illinois 
gun club for giving up spring shooting and 
recognizing the provisions of the federal law 



that is in dispute in the courts. Coming nearer 
home we take pleasure in congratulating the 
Mile High Gun Club of Denver for going still 
further and taking steps for the protection and 
propagation of wild life by limiting the shoot- 
ing season and creating preserves for birds 
and hatcheries for trout within its grounds. 

"There is a public sentiment that is greater 
than laws," said Secretary Cliff Webb of the 
club in explaining that organization's position. 
Certainly without public sentiment behind it a 
statute is like a blank cartridge. This club is 
not taking advantage of the law's delay on the 
federal migratory bird law and shooting in the 
spring at a time when it is more easy to decoy 
the birds, and, should the law be declared in- 
valid, it would make no difference to this or- 
ganization. Killing game in the spring time, 
law or no law, is contrary to nature and 
would soon result in extermination. 

Echo Answers Why? 

Mr. Cliff Webb, one of the pioneer 
sportsmen of Colorado, says : 

"I believe it can be said with justice 
that the sportsmen of Colorado are de- 
sirous of seeing the enforcement of any 
laws which will really protect the game, 
but it must be remembered that Colo- 
rado has been in a peculiar position. 
Why should it be possible for a rancher 
whose land is partly in Wyoming and 
partly in Colorado to fish all the year 
round on his Wyoming land, while just 
across the Colorado line he cannot cast 
a fly before May 25 and not fish after 
October 31? 

"We permit dove shooting fifteen days 
in Colorado, while across the line in New 
Mexico I believe there is a dove season 
of sixty days, and it was not so long ago 
that there was no closed season at all on 
doves. I have been in Durango when 
Colorado sportsmen could not hunt 
ducks, yet we could drop across the New 
Mexico line and have all the duck shoot- 
ing we wanted. Colorado . should have 
better game laws, and it should have uni- 
form laws with New Mexico and Wyom- 
ing. 

Game in the National Forests. 

Since the national forests take in prac- 
tically all the wildest parts of the Rocky 
Mountains it follows naturally that there 
is excellent sport to be had in many of 
thpm. 

The descriptive folder of the Routt 



THE GAME BREEDER 



39 



National Forest in Colorado says: "In 
all these mountains 'bear, deer, elk, 
mountain sheep, and grouse are to be 
found and most of the streams afford 
excellent trout fishing." It then gives a 
synopsis of the State game laws and 
makes the following plea to the public, 
to whom the use of the forest is so freely 
extended : "Please assist the forest serv- 
ice and the State of Colorado in pro- 
tecting game by not burning up their 
shelter through leaving your camp-fire 
unextinguished ; and leave the condition 
of your camp so that it will not pollute 
the streams which have been stocked for 
your pleasure, at great expense and un- 
der trying circumstances, by the govern- 
ment and State." — March "Outing." 

Fishing Licenses. 

The attitude of all the forest, fish and 
game associations and rod and gun clubs 
in New York State on the proposal of 
the conservation commission that a fish- 
ing license law be enacted is to be taken, 
according to a letter just mailed by Con- 
servation Commissioner George D. Pratt 
to the officers of these associations. The 
letter also asks for the sense of the asso- 
ciations regarding the proposal that each 
holder of a hunting and fishing license 
wear upon his clothing, at all times 
when hunting or fishing, a button bear- 
ing the number of his license. 

As we go to press we are informed 
that the salt water fishermen succeeded 
in defeating the bill to license anglers. 

Calling Out the Troops. 

For the first time since the "more 
game" movement was started it is 
deemed necessary to call out the troops 
for a war against the game ; war has 
been declared on the deer. The follow- 
ing is the story as it appeared in the 
World, New York. : 

Shelter Island (N. Y.) will be the scene of 
a hunting party next Monday, when twenty- 
seven National Guardsmen will be?in the 
slaughter of all the deer on the island. The 
killing has been ordered by State Conservation 
Commissioner George D. Pratt because deer 
have become a nuisance to the farmers, hav- 
ing eaten up many acres of produce. 

Suffolk County sportsmen are angry at the 
proposed slaughter of the 200 deer and will 



en.er a vigorous protest at Abany. But it is 
likely their objections will fall on deaf ears, 
as the question underwent long consideration 
before official action was taken. 

The deer were brought to the island many 
years ago by S. M. Smith, "the Borax King," 
and kept on his private preserve. A few es- 
caped and the number has increased greatly. 

The slaughtered deer will be shipped to the 
State hospitals for the insane. 

Wrong Deer Slaughter. 

Under the above heading the New 
York Press says : 

The Conservation Commission does not live 
up to its name when it gives orders to ex- 
terminate all the deer on Shelter Island. The 
fact that the venison will be sent to Brooklyn 
hospitals and charitable institutions is no re- 
compense for the ruthless slaughter scheduled. 

At the present time the Conservation Com- 
mission is putting forth great efforts to re- 
stock the Adirondacks with elk, an animal 
which in our grandfathers' day furnished 
noble sport and called many men to a season 
out of doors. Deer are not a pest in the 
Adirondacks. 

We published not long ago an ex- 
cellent article about how the California 
Elk which were doing a lot of damage 
were trapped and distributed to people 
who wanted the animals and to public 
parks where the only damage they might 
do would fall on the private or public 
owners of the Elk. 

Several contentions of The Game 
Breeder are emphasized by the calling 
out of the State troops to destroy the 
game on Shelter Island, N. Y. 

We have often said it is an easy mat- 
ter to have "more game." We have even 
pointed out places where quails were 
over abundant, where they eat too many 
grapes, and places where game keepers 
decided to "thin them out" (the bob- 
whites) after several thousands had been 
shot for sport and for food. 

We have said repeatedly that the State 
should not pasture State animals in the 
farmers' orchards and fields, to his irre- 
parable damage, in order to be able to 
afford targets for $1.00 licensed tres- 
passers. We have said often that the 
State can not make public play-grounds 
of country lawns, gardens, grain fields, 
and pastures, and expect the owners to 
keep up a head of game as an induce- 
ment for all classes of sportsmen, re- 



40 



THE GAME BREEDER 



sponsible and irresponsible, to shoot the 
game, the poultry, the farm animals or 
even human beings. We have said often 
the farmer who wants deer or other 
game should have them, stand the dam- 
age they do and sell the meat. 

It will be a remarkable spectacle if the 
program for the war on the deer on 
Shelter Island is carried out. We can 
picture a State Conservation Commis- 
sioner, mounted on a war horse, with 
drawn sword, charging the deer at the 
head of his troops. The plan of battle, 
as it is outlined in the daily papers, con- 
templates avoiding any close encounters 
with the antlered herd until the deer are 
in full retreat and have been driven to 
the edge of the island where the blue 
waters of Long Island Sound are too 
wide and too deep to give any chance for 
the escape of the enemy. Here the in- 
fantry are expected to close in and by 
volley firing to make the annihilation 
complete. Fathers and mothers, the last 
named pregnant with young, are all to 
die together at the hands of Conserva- 
tionists and the allied militia. We never 
thought the "more game" movement 
would lead to this. A change of the 
name of the Game Conservation Society, 
publishers of The Game Breeder, is con- 
templated. 

A Better Way. 

There clearly is a better way of hand- 
ling deer than to shoot them all down in 
the spring time. The State of New York 
has a big public play-ground where, at 
certain seasons, sportsmen are permitted 
to shoot the deer, and each other, to their 
heart's content, that is provided the heart 
is contented with one or two deer. The 
fray for most individuals usually ends 
for the season with the death of one 
sportsman shot down because he looked 
like a deer. 

The Shelter Island deer and the deer 
in other farming regions, where they are 
regarded as a nuisance, should be 
trapped and turned down in the Adiron- 
dacks where they will thrive until the 
time for the venison harvest arrives. 

Massachusetts has a good rule. Any 
farmer who is damaged by deer puts in 
a claim and the State pays for the dam- 



age. He raises his crop, and in places 
where deer occur in fair numbers, he has 
a sure customer at a fair price. 

Vermont has a somewhat similar law, 
we believe, and the fusilade on the 
farms, when the wild meat season is 
open, is said to be lively. We never 
heard if the little yellow horse dropped 
in the shafts or the colt killed by a stray 
bullet just after he had been put in a 
barn to escape the dangers of the bat- 
tle were paid for. They should be, of 
course, if public sport is expected to re- 
main popular. 

A Pot Shot at Deer. 

About the year 1730, John Rider of 
Plymouth killed three deer at a shot in 
that town. It was in a summer season, 
in a rye field * * * It was out of 
season by law to kill deer. The Superior 
Court, then in session in that town, ex- 
cused the man on the spot, it being in. 
protection of his standing grain. — Col- 
lections of Massachusetts Historical So- 
ciety, cited in Report of the Massachus- 
etts Commissioners of Fish and Game. 

This was clearly a case of justifiable 
cervicide and courts would do well to 
follow the precedent When boys are 
brought in for defending cabbage- 
patches from rabbits. 

One on the Editor. 

Owing to the unavoidable absence of 
the Editor last month, Mr. Hill, the Vice 
President of the Game Conservation So- 
ciety, took charge of the magazine. One 
of the readers said to the Editor a few 
days ago that he thought the April num- 
ber was one of the best ever issued. The 
Editor agreed with him. 



p_ s. — As we go to press we learn that 
the battle with the deer has been called 
off. Sportsmen have arranged- to have 
them trapped and shipped to private 
game preserves, the proper place for 
such animals when found outside of pub- 
lic parks. ^ 

Subscribe for The Game Breeder, only 
$1 a year. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



41 



QUAIL PRESERVING. 
WILD BREEDING METHODS. 

By D. W. Huntington. 



The best methods for rearing quail 
abundantly both for sport and for profit 
are the methods which have been used 
to make the gray partridges plentiful in 
Great Britain and on the Continent of 
Europe. By far the best and the cheap- 
est shooting which American sportsmen 
can undertake is quail shooting on the 
farms, which are for the most part 
posted against all shooting. The area of 
the posted farms which are suitable for 
quail preservation is tremendous and 
since the number of farms which are 
posted is increasing, and since the tend- 
ency of our legislation rapidly is in the 
direction of prohibiting quail shooting 
for terms of years or at all times, there 
should be no possible prejudice against 
the inexpensive clubs or syndicates of 
sportsmen who arrange with the land- 
owners to produce quail for shooting on 
the farms. Large numbers of these 
birds should be marketed .every season 
to pay the cost of production. 

It was the fashion a few years ago for 
shooting clubs to rent the shooting rights 
on a number of farms and to purchase 
and liberate a lot of quail every season. 
I have purchased quail for such clubs 
when, it was legal to trap and sell birds 
in some of the States, but since nothing 
was done in the way of game preserving, 
the foxes and other vermin took a good 
part of the purchased stock and the 
sportsmen shot what was left and relied 
upon the purchase of new birds each 
season in order to keep up some indiffer- 
ent shooting. I have been told some re- 
markable stories by superintendents of 
clubs about the evident destruction of 
birds by foxes and other vermin after 
the quail were liberated, and, of course, 
the system was entirely wrong. It sim- 
ply amounted to trapping live birds in 
Kansas, Oklahoma, North Carolina and 
the other States and turning the birds 
down at the Wyandangh, the Long 
Island Country Club, the Nitany, or 



some of the many other clubs, to feed 
vermin and to provide some fair shoot- 
ing, possibly for one year, and very little 
thereafter. It was necessary to pur- 
chase birds every season. The quail 
were trapped in one State to be ex- 
terminated in another. State game de- 
partments also were engaged in the same 
folly, and often I have thought that a 
capable game officer of a Southern State 
was absolutely right when he refused to 
grant a permit, as he had the right to 
do, to a! State officer in a State where 
the quail had become scarce, to purchase 
a lot of quail and move them to places 
where a sure extermination awaited 
them. 

The secret of success in quail breeding 
consists in making the ground safe and 
attractive. Ground is made safe when 
the numerous natural enemies of the 
game are controlled, and when no dogs, 
cats, rats or poachers are permitted to 
destroy the eggs or birds. On suitable 
ground the quail quickly will become 
tremendously abundant and remain so, 
although thousands be shot every season. 
The guns simply take the birds which 
vermin would have taken in the absence 
of beat-keepers. 

Ground is made attractive by making 
suitable nesting sites and safe small 
covers at frequent intervals. In the good 
old days of quail abundance many fields 
were enclosed with rail fences, the angles 
of which were full of grass, weeds and 
briars. The woods, also, contained much 
undergrowth, brush and briars ; there 
was plenty of berries, sumacs, wild roses, 
and many other natural foods for the 
quail, and numerous covers for the birds 
where ground and winged vermin found 
it difficult or impossible to destroy them. 
All sportsmen know that a freshly 
plowed field, a meadow, a pasture and 
all other fields surrounded by wire fences 
and entirely devoid of cover and natural 
foods, and open woodlands, containing 



42 



THE GAME BREEDER 



no brush or briars, will not harbor any 
quail. No one would think of running 
dogs over vast areas laid down in grass 
or planted in fall wheat, or over any 
naked fields without food or cover, even 
at the fences. Some of my favorite 
quail grounds have been made absolutely 
uninhabitable by reason of the introduc- 
tion of wire fences, without food or 
cover, about fields such as I have re- 
ferred to. All such places, however, can 
be made to yield quail abundantly pro- 
vided small areas of quail foods be 
planted and patches of berry-briars, 
sumac and wild roses be made to shelter 
the covies and supply the necessary 
foods. A strip of ground planted espe- 
cially for the birds, running either side 
of a wire fence, will make the field safe 
and attractive, and in large fields a quail 
garden might well be made in the center 
and enclosed with a large mesh chicken 
wire. The important foods for quail 
are berries and other fruits, sumac, wild 
roses, and various grains, especially 
wheat, buckwheat, and corn. A half acre 
planted here and there with these grains 
and bordered with blackberry briars, 
wild roses, sumac and some wild grasses 
and brush will make the most unattrac- 
tive ground attractive and comparatively 
safe. A beat-keeper should be em- 
ployed to persistently destroy the ver- 
min on his beat, which should not ex- 
ceed a thousand or twelve hundred acres, 
and he should be on hand in the winter 
to find and feed the birds during severe 
weather. A few artificial covers where 
the birds have grain and grit will save 



mem from climatic losses, but to keep up 
a good supply of birds the covers and 
foods should be made and kept plentiful 
and evenly distributed. Where there are 
small thickets these should be freed from 
vermin and a litle grain should be planted 
and left standing near them. The 
ground used for covers and foods should 
be rented, of course, and the more foods 
and covers planted the better. 

No one can be expected to breed quail 
or any other game or to provide the 
necessary foods and covers and to de- 
stroy the vermin in States where quail 
shooting is prohibited. While it un- 
doubtedly is necessary in many States to 
stop the shooting, so long as no one 
looks after the game, all breeders should 
be excepted from such laws and given 
every encouragement to make the quail 
plentiful on farms which they own or 
which they rent for shooting or breeding 
purposes. As soon as it is legal for 
breeders to sell some of their game, the 
sale of a very little of it will pay all the 
expenses of a well-conducted shoot or 
preserve. "• 

I know places where the quail have 
been made tremendously abundant, and 
where they are kept plentiful year after 
year, although thousands of birds are 
shot every season. There are no such 
places in the States where quail shooting 
is prohibited or where the seasons are 
very short and the bag limits very small, 
and where the lands are made more and 
more unsafe and more and more un- 
attractive because they are closely culti- 
vated and the natural covers and foods 
are destroyed. 



PARTRIDGE SHOOTING IN HUNGARY. 



By Captain C. E. Radcliffe. 



Probably there is no more extraordi- 
nary sight to the eyes of a shooting man 
than that which he sees on his first visit 
to one of the vast Hungarian estates on 
the fertile plains of that fine country, 
where the owner takes an interest in the 
preservation of his domains for par- 



tridge shooting. The average head of 
game per acre is positively bewildering, 
even to those who are accustomed to the 
best estates in the eastern counties of 
England. 

For the purpose of illustrating how 
the sport is carried on in Hungary, a few 



THE GAME BREEDER 4$ 

notes will be given upon the shooting affect the birds much if one may judge- 
over an estate which can boast of being by the number on the ground, and it con- 
the finest natural partridge shooting in sideraJbly assists the keepers in killing. 
Hungary, and therefore the best in off the vermin, in which respect also. 
Europe. • Hungary is plentifully supplied. 

About three hours' journey by train In this country, as the partridges are 
from Budapest, in the district of Nyitra- far more forward than with us, par- 
M.egye, is situated the estate of Tot- tridge shooting opens on August 1st, but 
Megyer, which is owned by Count Louis at Tot-Megyer, where only a few days'' 
Karolyi, and here indeed is par excel- partridge shooting annually take place,, 
lence the home of the partridge. When and a great area of the ground is not 
speaking of this estate as the best nat- shot over at all, it is the custom to shoot 
ural shooting in Hungary, it is meant to late in August or early in September, 
distinguish it from other places in the The actual number of days' partridge 
country where a curious custom is some- shooting is generally only ten in all — 
times adopted of buying large quantities five days early in the season, and again 
of birds from other estates and turning five days' hare driving in November, 
them down on the ground to be shot a over the same ground, when also a good 
short time before shooting. By this number of partridges are killed, 
means the extraordinary bag of 2,983 As the fences are few and far be- 
partridges in a day was killed in 1893 by tween, the general manner of shooting 
a party of eight guns shooting over the is for the guns to walk in line, with a 
estates of St. Johann, then owned by the number of beaters between each gun, 
late Baron Hirsch. Again, in 1894, at and behind each gun a man carrying a 
the same place, eight guns bagged 2,725 red flag on a long pole, so that it is 
partridges in a day. The former of easy to see the general line of advance 
these two stands as a record for numbers and the respective positions of the guns 
in one day, but as it has been closely when moving through the fields of stand- 
approached at Tot-Megyer, where none ing maize, which is often higher than a 
but bona fide wild birds are shot, the man's head. As a general rule, crops 
two can scarcely be compared. of maize are sown in long strips, with 

The actual extent of Tot-Megyer es- spaces between each where corn of 
tates is about 60,000 English acres, of various kinds is also sown. The strips 
which some 7,400 acres are coverts, and of each are from about 50 to 150 yards 
the remainder cultivated land. The wide, and as soon as the corn has been 
crops which are cultivated chiefly consist -harvested the birds take refuge in the 
of maize and various kinds of corn, with maize during the heat of the day. When 
a certain quantity of mangolds and other the maize is very high it is almost im- 
roots. The land is so fertile and rich possible to see or shoot well in it. There- 
in natural food for partridges, that it fore, as the line of guns and beaters 
is not difficult to see in the autumn how walk across the line or strips in which 
it is possible for it to carry such an the crops are sown, the most effective 
immense head of game as it does. But plan is for each gun, on entering a high 
the natural question which strikes the bit of maize, to push on in advance of 
mind of a stranger is, how do all these the general line of beaters, and to stand 
partridges live in the severe winters on the edge of the open stubble on the 
when the ground is often a long while other side, where he can see to shoot. 
deep beneath the snow ? The answer The clouds of partridges which come out 
is, that in such cases vast quantities of of each strip of maize are absolutely 
wheat are strewn about on the snow bewildering. At first, before any birds 
by the keepers for the benefit of the have been scattered, coveys come out 
partridges. Another thing which strikes four and five at a time and get packed 
the English eye is the absence of any like grouse. Al these birds rising close 
hedges or suitable places for the birds round the euns. together with swarms 
to nest in, but this does not appear to of hares, which jump up in every direc- 



44 



THE GAME BREEDER 



tion, present the most extraordinary 
sight as they go streaming across the 
open stubble, and the shooting is pretty 
lively all along the line until the arrival 
of the beaters into the open space, 
when there is a brief halt to pick up 
the birds. A few small boys follow each 
gun, and it is their particular duty to 
collect and carry what falls to the gun 
of each shooter whom they follow. Un- 
doubtedly, to judge from the zeal which 
these urchins display in trying to claim 
every bird which they can see, they 
make small wagers amongst themselves 
on the result of the pick-up, during the 
day, that is credited to their respective 
masters. Retrievers are not often used, 
and consequently many runners are lost 
in the high maize; but it would be hard 
to prevent any dog from flushing scores 
of birds if put on a running partridge 
only a few yards in front of the line. 
With the exception of one or two dogs 
used by the head keepers behind the 
line, retrievers are hardly at all in evi- 
dence. 

If any of these vast fields are for- 
tunate enough to possess one or more 
fences, the usual mode adopted to walk 
in line, driving the birds ahead, until a 
fence is reached, when the guns halt, 
and the beaters go round and drive back 
the birds over the line of guns, thus 
making a pleasant variation from the 
continuous walking in line and shooting 
straight in front. The season of 1902 



was considered a bad one at Tot-Megyer 
on account of the heavy hailstorms, 
which killed many young birds early in 
the season. For this reason there were 
no regular big days' shooting over the 
estate, but only four short days. On 
the first two days two guns bagged 260 
brace of birds and on the 27th and 28th 
of August a party of three guns, consist- 
ing of Count L. Karolyi, Prince Z. Odes- 
calehi, and the present writer, bagged 
390 brace, the last day yielding 227 
brace in less than five hours' shooting. 
Had the number of guns been six or 
seven, the bags would have been more 
than doubled each day, as with such a 
small party the coveys kept breaking on 
the flanks of the line, and birds were 
never scattered, nor the conveys broken 
up. The last-named bag was made in 
one field of less than 300 acres, and as 
an example of what a larger party can 
do, it may be mentioned that the bag 
on the same ground in 1901, with a party 
of ten guns, was 905 brace in the day. 
This day is a record for Tot-Megyer. 
In September. 1901, ten guns bagged 
3,510 brace in five days' shooting, and 
the bag for the season 1901 in ten days' 
shooting, of which five days were in 
September and five days were devoted 
to hare driving in November, shows a 
total of over 5,000 brace of birds — a 
bag which could easily have been 
doubled by a few more days' shooting 
early in the season. 



HARE DRIVING IN HUNGARY. 

By Captain C. E. Radcliffe. 



In Hungary, on some estates, the 
hares are so numerous that they are 
positively a nuisance, especially early 
in the season, when walking through 
ithe maize! fields after partridges, for 
then they keep rushing madly about 
along the line of beaters and guns, and 
in such numbers that the ground in 
places seems alive with them. Here, 
however, it is forbidden to shoot them 
when out partridge shooting, since the 



great hare drives are reserved for the 
month of November, when the land has 
been cleared of crops. The Hungarian 
hare is a larger animal than its English 
neighbor, but differs in no respects as 
regards its timidity and its frantic 
rushes to break back through a line of 
beaters and guns when hustled about on 
strange ground. 

The general method of conducting one 
of the great hare shoots in which Hun- 



THE GAME BREEDER 45 

gary excels is as follows: The guns, Hungarian records. Here the hare 

usually from eight to ten in number, are drives take place in November, and gen- 

tormed in line with several beaters be- erally last rive- or six days, the average 

tween each gun. The whole line covers bag being about 1,000 hares per day. 

perhaps a mile or more of front. From The best bag in one day was 1,512 hares 

each flank of the line a large number with eight guns in 1900. The late Count 

of men are sent forward, and placed Karolyi, who was well known for many 

at intervals in a long line at right angles years as the Hungarian Ambassador in 

to the line of guns. These flankers may England, once tried "to see what bag he 

be as many as you please, and cover a could make to his own gun. For this 

distance of varying extent, according to purpose he selected his estate of Stomla, 

the number of men employed. About which is some distance from Tot-Meg- 

150 men are generally employed in each yer, and is celebrated for its number of 

of the flank lines. When the whole hares. Here he adopted a drive similar 

party is formed up, it is really three to the method described, with the excep- 

sides of a vast square lined with men, tion that when the drivers swept back 

the front of the square, which is the the ground towards him, they were 

general line of advance, being left open, formed in the shape of a huge soda- 

At a given signal, which is generally a water bottle, whilst he stood as! it were 

note from the head keeper's horn, the in the neck of the bottle. The result of 

whole body of men and guns advance, this day's shoot was the extraordinary 

each keeping their respective positions bag of 600 hares in a little less than 

and distances. It is not long before the five hour's shooting, When Count Karo- 

whole ground in front of the guns is lyi decided to stop, and as far as the 

alive with moving hares.. This general writer's knowledge serves him, this bag 

advance is maintained for a long dis- stands as a record for one gun on any 

tance, often as far as two or three miles, one day's hare shooting in the world, 

with only occasional halts to collect the It is pleasant in these days to see 

bag. During this period it is the duty flocks of the Great Bustard on some 

of the flankers to keep as many hares of these Hungarian estates. Here one 

as possible within the square in front can see, even from the train, a few 

of the guns. When the advance is con- miles from Vienna, these fine birds walk- 

sidered to have been continued far ing about on the open country. A cer- 

enough, the guns halt and form up at tain number of them are annually shot, 

convenient distances, to cover the ground but they are very wary, and like the 

between them. The flankers then con- bustards on the plains at Jerez in Spain, 

verge and close the open end of the they are well able to take care of them- 

square, and being joined by the other selves. The method generally adopted 

beaters, they form a semicircle and in Hungary to approach them is by 

sweep back the country in front of the means of a horse and cart carrying a 

guns, thus driving numbers of hares load of hay or straw, in which the shooter 

back which have been all day moving in is hidden, and by this means he may be 

front of the line, and also encircling lucky enough to get one shot at a 

many fresh ones, together with swarms bustard after many miles of manoeuv- 

of partridges, which latter, if the wind ring his cart. Occasionally a few are 

is favorable, give the finest shots imag- shot in the big drives, when some less 

inable, as they come rocketing over the wary than the rest pass over the guns, 
guns in the open. 

As the estates of Tot-Megyer were 

selected to exemplify Hungarian par- How absurd it seems to permit every- 

tridge shooting, a few notes on the bag one to shoot 25 birds or some other num- 

of hares generally made there will suf- ber per diem and to deny to breeders the 

fice, although these bags, unlike those of right to take a similar number for propa- 

the partridges, must not be taken as gation. 



46 



THE GAME BREEDER 




An Old Orchard — a Good Place for Geese. 



BREEDING CANADA GEESE. 



H. S. Little. 



In April, 1904, I bought my first pair 
of Canada geese. They did not breed 
the first year, as I did not get them 
early enough to have them get accus- 
tomed to the range; the next spring 
the goose laid five eggs which hatched 
and were all raised. 

I have been increasing my flock by 
adding pairs of breeders and now have 
a number of pairs that have been breed- 
ing for the last few years. 

We have about five acres in an old 
orchard with a brook running through 
it about ten months of the year, and 
an artificial pond at the lower end, the 
geese are kept here the year round ; 
they feed on the low ground near the 
brook and do not require grain, except 
when the grass is covered with snow. 
We allow them to nest as they please; 
some pairs will nest near the pond, build- 
ing up a pile of grass and weeds ; others 
will use shredded wheat cases that we 
put out for our ducks to nest in. 

I have tried taking the eggs away and 



placing under hens, but with no success, 
as the geese never laid a second clutch 
and the hens did not raise as many gos- 
lings as the old geese would. 

Our geese average about five eggs, 
some will lay seven, but that is the 
largest number I ever had. 

The young are very hardy; they will 
follow the old geese a few hours after 
they are hatched. On our range they 
do not require feeding, as they gain rap- 
idly on grass alone. Sometimes I give 
them one feed a day of Spratts' Patent 
game meal for a week or so to give them 
a good start. Of course, on some ranges 
grass would not be sufficient; then I 
should feed the game meal and cracked 
corn as they got older. 

I pinion the youngsters when a few 
days did, using a sharp pair of scissors 
and cutting the wing just beyond the 
first joint or elbow; if not pinioned they 
will fly at about ten weeks. 

We have had very good luck in mating 
our geese. In fact, we have never had 






I 



THE GAME BREEDER 



47 




A Fair Brood. 



a goose or gander that was over three 
years old that refused to mate. They 
like to pick their mates, however, and 
it is best if you have several odd birds 
to turn them in a yard together arid 
let them pick to suit themselves. I 
never knew a goose to lay under three 
years, and it is usually four, but I have 
had a gander mate at two years with an 
old goose and raise a nice flock. 

Canada geese must be kept on the 
range where they are to breed through 



the winter or placed there at least by the 
first of March, as otherwise they will 
not be likely to breed the first year.. . . 

Another thing to look out for — keep 
dogs and strangers out of the breeding 
yard, and don't disturb the geese when 
setting any more than necessary. 

I would sum it up, get old geese (older 
the better) ; get them early ; have a good, 
large range, with a pond or brook for 
them to mate on, have a pile of coarse 
sand : and oyster shells where they can 
find it, and let them alone. 




A Safe Rearing Ground. 



48 



THE GAME BREEDER 



HOW I GOT MY WILD BLOOD. 

By J. D. McClintic. 



As some of my patrons ask how I 
got my wild blood, I will explain in as 
few words as I can. It would take a 
book to hold all my experience with this 
grand and most beautiful of all fowls — 
the wild turkey. I got my first wild 
blood about 25 or 26 years ago by one 
of my hens straying away with the wild 
turkeys in the mountains. She came 
home after being away for some time 
with a flock of little turks. Four of 
them were wild arid little beauties. They 
could fly to the tops of the trees When 
the little tame fellows could not fly on 
the fence. My next wild blood I pro- 
cured .about 20 years ago, as was de- 
scribed at the time by The Lewistown 
Gazette, as follows : 

Saturday a large wild gobbler came down 
off the mountain to the orchard at Valley 
View Poultry Farm and started a fight with 
the large bronze gobbler belonging to the 
farm. The proprietor, hearing a terrible 
thumping, went to see what was the matter. 
On reaching the orchard, he beheld the two 
gobblers engaged in a deadly battle. Stand- 
ing and watching the fight until his turkey 
got the best of the knight of the forest and 
had a deadly grip on his throat, he went to 
take hold of the intruder, when his turkey 
let go his hold and away the wild turkey 
went to the mountains. Mr. McClintic says 
the fight was worth seeing. 

The large bronze gobbler belonging to the 
Valley View Poultry Farm died last week 
from the effects of the fight he had with the 
wild gobbler from the mountain two weeks 
ago. The gobbler that did the deed has 
taken up his abode on the farm with the 
turkey hens, staying through the day and go- 
ing to the mountain at night. He is a grand 
bird in size and plumage and struts around 
among the turkeys and chickens as if he 
had always been used to civilized life. 

This grand old Tom stayed with my 
hens till the breeding*- season was over, 
then left; but the next "spring he returned 
early in March. He was nearly starved, 
as the winter was severe, with deep 
snow. He ate about a" pint of corn at 
his first feed. He was not afraid of me, 
but was shy of strangers and would run 
to the mountain when strangers would 



get too close to him, but finally, he did 
not mind strangers much. I raised some 
grand, beautiful, birds out of this old 
Knight of the Forest. After this my 
hens mingled with wild Toms along the 
mountain, as I did not have my orchards 
wired then. Six years ago another Wild 
Tom came. I penned him with the hens, 
but if I did not let him out at nights 
he would fly out. He would never roost 
with the hens, but would go to the moun- 
tain every night. About the second week 
of last February one morning, as I was 
feeding my turkeys, I saw an old wild 
Tom standing outside of the wire. He 
left, but I believed he would return. I 
went to work and prepared for him by 
wiring one end of one of my orchards 
off for him, made a large gate on the 
side next the woods. He came back, 
the first week of March. I opened the 
gate and he came in, and was right at 
home among the hens. At first he would 
not roost with the hens, but he finally 
got to roosting with them. He stayed 
till about the 15th of August. He came 
back once after this. I called to him as 
he was some distance away with another 
old Wild Tom. He started to come to 
me, but the other old fellow ran for 
the mountain. He stood undecided for 
a few moments, then raised| his wings 
as if in a farewell salute, and ran after 
his companion. 

He had become so tame he' would run 
around me and play when I Would go to 
feed him. I photographed hjim. He is 
the first wild turkey right \ from our 
mountain on record that was ever photo- 
graphed. I took several pictures of him, 
but it was hard to get a good! picture, as 
he was afraid of the kodak.! The best 
picture I got of him he was coming to- 
wards me watching the kodak and started 
to run just as I snapped him. It does 
not do . him j ustice . at rt all, but I j ust 
wanted his picture as a novelty and 
something rare. He was admired and 



THE GAME BREEDER 



49 



was a wonder to all who visited our farm 
last summer. I have some fine young 
birds sired by him. I believe this old 
Tom will return next spring if he escapes 
the hunter. 

I have been a great hunter of wild tur- 
keys in past years, killing up to thirty in 
some years, but now no one could pay 
me to kill the beautiful birds; they are 
getting too scarce. It used to be a com- 
mon sight about twenty years ago to see 
thirty to forty in a flock ranging along 
the foot of the mountains in the fields 
where now we see none. Where there 
was one hunter then there is one dozen 
now, and with their repeating guns there 
is no chance for the poor turkey. If the 
government does not prohibit the hunt- 
ing of them for a number of years there 
will not be one left, and with the going 
of the wild turkey our tame turkeys will 
dwindle away, for now turkey raising is 
almost a thing of the past all over the 



country, so we must get back where na- 
ture started with the wild turkey to get 
the vitality that has been lost through 
breeding and feeding; for all other 
breeds originated from the wild turkey. 
The wild turkey crossed with the bronze 
is the finest domestic turkey to be had. 
The plumage is rendered more brilliant, 
the carriage more graceful and the flesh 
greatly improved, and having a yellow 
skin they make a nicer appearance 
dressed for the market. The wild tur- 
keys of our Northern clime have more 
vitality and can endure more exposure 
than those of the Southern clime; our 
winters being so severe with the tem- 
perature 20 and 25 degrees below zero 
at times. With snow two feet deep on 
the mountain they must subsist chiefly 
on the buds of trees. I have had half 
wild hens to reach the age of twelve 
years and be strong and vigorous and 
still lay. This shows the wonderful 
vitality of our wild turkeys. 



MORE CAT TALES. 

By Edward Howe Forbush. 



[The tales about cats printed in the April Game Breeder and continued in this number 
are from an important bulletin written by Edward Howe Forbush, the State Ornithologist 
of Massachusetts, and published by the State Board of Agriculture.] 



Vagabond or Wild House Cats in the 
Country. 

Mr. William Brewster, of Cambridge, 
the Nestor of New England Ornitholo- 
gists, says he and his dogs frequently 
have started cats from their resting 
places in woods and game covers. He 
says, writing from Concord, they are sel- 
dom noticed, being shy, elusive and 
largely nocturnal, but that he finds their 
tracks everywhere in the woods after the 
first snowfall. He asserts that his guides, 
James Bernier and William Sargent, of 
Upton, Me., trappers of large experience, 
assured him some years ago that the 
forested parts of New England with 
which they were familiar were numer- 
ously inhabited by woods cats. Quite as 
many cats as. other fur-bearing animals 



were caught in traps even in locations 
upward of thirty miles from any house 
or clearing, and over. the northern Maine 
line in the Canadian woods. 

Mr. Charles E. Goodhue, naturalist of 
Penacook, N. H., says it is hard to tell 
whether or not cats are vagrant or wild, 
but local trappers get many in their traps, 
and cats roam over the country in every 
direction. Three trappers among my 
correspondents corroborate this. Mr. 
Nathaniel Wentworth, of Hudson, N. H., 
former game commissioner of that State, 
says that he has seen many cats, some- 
times miles away from any house, and 
feels sure that more game birds are killed 
by them than by the hunters — an opinion 
expressed by many others. 

Wm. C. Adams, a member of the Mas- 



60 



THE GAME BREEDER 



sachusetts Commission on Fisheries and 
Game, has noticed particularly the tracks 
of cats in his travels. He found numer- 
ous cat tracks on the islands of Mus- 
keget, Tuckernuc, Nantucket and Mar- 
tha's Vineyard. On Nantucket he noted 
that the tracks extended three or four 
miles from any habitation. He saw 
traces of many birds evidently killed by 
cats, particularly on Muskeget and Mar- 
tha's Vineyard. He describes a similar 
condition on Cape Cod, in the townships 
of Provincetown, Eastham, Orleans and 
Sandwich, where he has hunted. He 
says that cats are numerous in a large 
section between Worcester and the 
Rhode Island line, and in the country 
between Ware and Greenfield; also be- 
. tween Adams and North Adams, and in 
many parts of New Hampshire. He has 
observed many tracks on the winter 
snows; he has seen many cats, some of 
them with birds, and frequently has no- 
ticed them on lonely roads at night, by 
the light of his car lamps. Several hunt- 
ers have told him of finding litters of 
kittens far back in the woods. 

The Cat and Bobwhite. 

Mr. Fred A. Olds saw a cat spring 
into the air and come down with a full- 
grown cock bobwhite in its claws. Col. 
Charles E. Johnson asserts that he saw 
a cat with a bobwhite in its mouth run- 
ning toward a Negro cabin. When the 
colonel arrived at the cabin he found a 
colored woman plucking the bird. She 
said that the cat brought in birds very 
often. Many cats are encouraged by 
their owners to bring in game. T. B. 
Johnson says, in "The Vermin De- 
stroyer," that he has known several cats 
that caught' game and brought it home. 
These cats were highly esteemed by their 
owners. 

Mr. F. W. Henderson tells, in the 
Rockland "Independent," of a cat that 
brought her kittens an entire brood of 
bobwhites. Dr. George W. Field relates 
that a covey of bobwhites which he was 
watching in . Sharon was discovered by 
a cat and attacked at night, at intervals 
of two to seven days, until the number 
had .become reduced from sixteen to 
eight. They then left in a body for Can- 



ton, where they were recognized later. 
Mr. E. Colfax Johnson, ot budbury, 
says that he has known of entire hocks 
oi . young bobwhites being destroyed by 
cats. Mr. John M. Crampton, superin- 
tendent for the Connecticut State Board 
of Fisheries and Game, writes that last 
fall (1914) a farmer requested that a 
special protector be sent to look after 
the bobwhites on his land. When the 
warden arrived he found that the farmer 
had fifteen cats, some of which had 
brought in three bobwhites already that 
morning. Mr. B. S. Blake, of Webster, 
tells of a cat that took home three bob- 
whites in one week. Mr. Edward L. 
Parker tells of a servant who saw a eat 
break up two bobwhites' nests. Senator 
Louis Hilsendegen, of Michigan, says in 
the "Sportsman's Review" that Henry 
Ford bought 200 pairs of bobwhites at 
$3 a pair and released them on his farm 
at Dearborn, Michigan. A stray cat, left 
by a farmer who had moved away, found 
them and it was noticed that their num- 
bers were decreasing rapidly. A watch 
was set for the cat; it was shot and 
found to weigh sixteen pounds. Under 
a rail shelter, where the birds had fed, 
a mass of feathers and other remains 
about a foot deep was found. That cat, 
says the Senator, had killed more than 
200 bobwhites, which had cost the owner 
$300. Mr. E. R. Bryant, of the Henry 
Ford farms, writes me that this story is 
true except that it may be a little over- 
drawn in regard to the number of birds 
killed. He never knew exactly how 
many were slain by this cat. 

Ruffed Grouse. 

Cats are nearly as destructive to 
grouse as to bobwhites. I have seen a 
ruffed grouse that was killed on her nest 
and partly eaten by a cat, while the eggs 
were scattered and some were broken 
but not eaten. Almost invariably in such 
cases a careful search will reveal a few 
hairs of the cat on some branch or twig, 
lost in the struggle. If several steel 
traps be set, carefully concealed, around 
the dead bird the cat may be taken. 

Mr. William Brewster tells of a day's 
hunt by four sportsmen with their dogs, 
in which they killed only one game bird 



THE GAME BREEDER 



51 



— a bobwhite. On their return at night grouse. Mr. Cassius Tirrall, of South 

to the farm-house where they were stay- Weymouth, asserts that a cat living not 

ing, they found that the farm cat had far from his home has brought in so 

beaten their score, having brought in many bobwhites and grouse that the fam- 

during the day two bobwhites and one ily has "lost track of the number." 




Guinea Hens as Insect Eaters. 

Mr. G. H. Sander, of Dayton, Ohio, 
says in Sportmen's Review : 

As I have a number of guinea hens on my 
farm near West Milton, Miami county, Ohio, 
and the farmer tells me they are great- insect 
eaters, why not encourage farmers to raise 
them for food, as they are a South African 
game bird domesticated in this country. I 
hear in California they raise them to take the 
place of game; why not in Ohio? 

The guinea is a good watch dog, wary for 
hawks, and will care for themselves at all 
times. It is a fine bird to eat for the dinner 
table. 

Thousands of guineas have been 
raised and sold as food in the New York 
markets. Some of the game clubs have 
given them a trial as game birds but they 
are reported to be not even as good as 
pheasants to say nothing about our 
grouse and quail. I have seen guineas 
half wild on the prairie in Illinois which 
flushed well and flew as strongly as the 
prairie grouse. One occasion I came 
very near bagging a brace of guineas 
when I was shooting grouse. The birds 
flushed well ahead of my dogs and I 
detected the white spots just in time to 
stay the trigger finger. 



The Watch Dog and the Owl. 

The guinea hen often has been called 
the watch-dog of the barn yard. We 
engaged one as a watch dog for the mal- 
lards and pheasants on the preserve of 
the Game Breeders' Association, but one 
evening, shortly after the guinea arrived, 
a great horned owl dropped down and 
"nipped off her nose," her whole head in 
fact. The owl took a plymouth rock hen 
and four mallards for dessert. He or 
his mate now sits on a shelf behind the 
editor's chair in the office of The Game 
Breeder, having been nicely embalmed 
by taxidermist Sauter. His portrait ap- 
pears in the booklet of the Hercules 
Powder Company, "Game Farming for 
Profit and Pleasure." Whenever any of 
our readers wish to see the owl they can 
write to the Hercules Powder Company 
for the booklet. It is for free distribu- 
tion and "well worth the money" — that 
is to say the money paid for it including 
the owl's 'portarit. 

More About Duck Breeding. 

Many of our readers are asking for 
special information about the breeding 



52 



THE GAME BREEDER 



of species of ducks- other than the mal- 
lards. 

We have printed several short articles 
on this subject by successful breeders 
and for the benefit ot new readers who 
are asking advice we repeat the sub- 
stance of some of these articles. 

The mallards reared on preserves are 
easier to handle than other ducks are 
because they are descended from ducks 
artificially reared and in many cases they 
have a more or less visible admixture of 
tame blood; this is true even of some 
ducks which are strong on the wing and 
afford good sport. 

The black ducks have been bred in 
good numbers by some of our readers 
and by the writer, but in every case the 
stock ducks have been in captivity at 
least two years and those which have 
been made fairly tame are the birds 
which lay eggs. They do best when 
given a considerable area about the pond 
where they can select a suitable nesting 
place in grass, brush or weeds. They 
should not be disturbed by strangers or 
by stray dogs or other animals which 
may alarm or destroy them. I have seen 
birds of the third or fourth generation 
which were quite as easy to handle as 
some mallards are, and I once purchased 
a lot of such ducks which were reared 
in a small yard near a farm house and 
which fed fearlessly at their owner's feet. 
I have had no trouble breeding these 
black ducks and some others which I 
purchased from another 1 breeder, which 
were quite tame. They were strong on 
the wing and often went miles away 
from home visiting a bay where they 
remained for hours at a time. They re- 
turned very promptly at four o'clock 
every afternoon when I always gave 
them a good meal. They were so prompt 
that we could tell the time by their ar- 
rival. One of our readers described how 
he rears about 200 black ducks every 
season in a wire inclosure about one- 
third water, one-third marsh and one- 
third higher ground suitable for nesting, 
containing grass, brush, etc. Mr. Pickell 
has succeeded in making pintails as 
tame as. mallards and as easy to handle 
and breed. He and others have bred the 
blue-winged teal, the green-winged teal 



and some other species. Many breed the 
wood-duck which is quite easy to 
handle ; some have bred the ruddy duck 
and a few other species. 

I have purchased hundreds of wild 
black ducks and pintails which would 
not lay an egg and persisted in remaining 
wild and shy. This was due no doubt to 
a lack of attention by the game keepers 
who were very busy rearing thousands 
of pheasants and mallards and had not 
the time or the patience necessary to suf- 
ficiently tame the wild birds. 

The secret of success is to start with 
birds which have been partly tamed, pre- 
ferably with those which have laid eggs 
in captivity, or with captivity bred birds. 
Since most species will not lay eggs until 
the second or third year the dealer who 
has such stock naturally will ask a higher 
price for it than for fresh trapped birds 
or the easy going commercial mallards. 
Fresh trapped mallards are not easy to 
handle but they are in great demand 
since all breeders wish to add wild stock 
to their flocks in order to keep the birds 
strong on the wing and suitable for 
shooting. 

Fresh trapped mallards, therefore, are 
worth at least twice as much as captivity 
bred mallards are, but with the other 
species the figures are reversed since 
fresh trapped birds do not lay eggs for 
some time and birds which will lay are 
naturally in big demand. 

Care and Feed for Young Turkeys. 

J. D. McClintic, who breeds tame, wild 
and half-breed turkeys with great suc- 
cess, says : 

First see that they are free frm lice, see 
that they are not over fed. Lice and over 
feeding kill more young turkeys than any 
other cause. Feed bread cut in slices and 
browned in oven, crush fine when cold, mix 
with hard boiled egg cut fine and cut dande- 
lions; moisten with a litle milk or water if 
not moist enough to stick together. After 
two or three weeks old mix a little shorts 
with bread and egg. Feed a good chick feed 
as they grow older ; give them range if you 
can. 

Importance of Range for Wild Tur- 
keys. 

It is an easy matter to rear wild tur- 
keys, just as it is to rear quail, grouse, 



THE. GAME BREEDER 



53 



wild fowl and other game birds, pro-, 
vided you know how. i'ne cioser tney 
are kept "in captivity," as some game 
laws read, the more clanger there is of 
diseases and of producing birds uninter- 
esting to sportsmen and undesirable on 
the table. 

I once reared two small lots of wild 
turkeys from eggs and stock birds pro- 
cured from the late Professor Blanton, 
of Virginia. Young turkeys from eggs 
hatched under barnyard fowls in the 
hatching house (where thousands of 
pheasants and wild duck eggs were 
hatched) were taken to the rearing field 
with their foster mothers, placed in 
coops and fed (somewhat overfed) on 
pheasant foods. The young birds did 
well for a time but soon it became evi^ 
dent that something ailed them. They 
became dull and stupid. I noticed that 
they stood about the board on which 
their food was placed and did not notice 
the grasshoppers which hopped about 
abundantly at their feet. I killed one of 
the birds and attempted to have an ex- 
amination to ascertain the disease made 
in Washington but the weather was 
warm and although the bird was shipped 
in ice it arrived in a bad condition and 
the cause or kind of disease was not dis- 
covered. The other birds died one by 
one, in my opinion from over-feeding 
and too much "in captivity" words which 
should be fired from every statute in the 
interest of the health of the game birds. 

One brood of the turkeys hatched wild 
by one of our hens in the woods was 
brought in to the farm house by the 
proud mother in fine condition. We fed 
the old bird a little and she moved on 
into a small wood bordered by grain and 
grass where grasshoppers and other in- 
sects and wild berries were plentiful. 
Here the birds roamed by day and 
roosted in the trees at night. I told the 
gamekeeper's boy to throw stones at 
them if they attempted to come in to 
feed and once saw him drive them out 
of the pheasant pen. They were quite 
shy but thrived amazingly on the wild 
food found in field and wood. When 
about half grown a great horned owl 
took several of the birds but the rest 
matured and were handsome, healthy 



and strong on the wing. A number were 
shot on the wing in the autumn. , I am 
fully convinced that turkeys reared in 
orchards, fields and woods with a good 
range are not hard to manage and that 
they can be reared very inexpensively 
since they will procure practically all of 
their food in the fields and woods. 



A Mixed Ration for Pheasants. 

Two ring-necked pheasants (a cock 
and a hen) confined in a pen 8' x 16' x 6' 
and rat-proof, sides and top of 1" mesh 
galvanized wire, were recently tested as 
to their food preference. Food was ac- 
cessible to them at all times but in sep- 
arate hoppers, which were covered with 
wire to prevent waste. All food mater- 
ials were carefully weighed on a kitchen 
scale. My purpose in making the test 
was to establish the food preference of 
the birds. 

For convenience of comparison I have 
♦abulated the results as follows: 

Oz. Per cent. 

Cracked wheat 36 20 

Cracked corn 41.4 23 

Rolled oats 12.6 7 

Rape seed 21.6 12 

Millet seed 14.4 8 

Canary seed 12.6 7 

Ground dried meat 34.2 19 

Granulated charcoal 1.8 1 

Grit 1.8 1 

Ground bone 1.8 1 

Calcined shell 1.8 1 



180.0 



100 



In addition, the birds were supplied 
with a head of fresh lettuce per day, o? 
which they consumed from one-half to 
three-quarters. It will be seen that the 
food taken averaged 2^4 ounces each per 
day. 

At the commencement of the test the 
cock weighed 1 pound 14 ounces and the 
hen 1 pound 8 ounces; at the ena of 
thirty days, when the test was completed, 
the cock weighed 2 pounds 4 ounces, a 
gain of 8 ounces, whereas the hen 
weighed 1 pound 12 ounces, or a gain of 
4 ounces. This gain in weight indicated 
that these pheasants had thrived upon 
the mixed food afforded them. — Joseph 
Ketchum, in California Fish and Game. 



54 THE GAME BREEDER 

T*?. e Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



have remarked at other times it is better 
to kill nonsense piecemeal than not to 
kill it at all. We now propose that the 
laws be amended still further so that it 
edited by dwight w. huntington w ju no t b e criminal to eat any kind of 

food, produced by industry within or 

NEW YORK, MAY, 1916. without the State. Such an amendment 

will soon make the quail, grouse, wild 



terms: turkeys and many species of water fowl 

10 Cents a Copy— $1.00 a year in Advance. as plentiful as the pheasants, deer and 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. ducks nOW are in the hands of game 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

breeders. 



The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 



PUBLISHERS, 150 NASSAU ST., NEW YORK QUR GROTJSE AND QUAIL. 

D. W. Huntington, President, . 

f. r. Peixotio, Treasurer, Forest and Stream in its last issue 

j. c Huntington, secretary seems to have abandoned all hope of 

Telephone, Beekman 36s5. ever having any native game in America 

===^==^^= and seems glad to learn that pheasants 

AT LAST. reared in captivity can be made to take 

The New York legislature has decided the place of our quail and grouse, 
to take our advice and has opened the We are pleased to say that the United 
markets to some species of game pro- States is now, probably, the third largest 
duced by breeders in other States. It is pheasant producing country in the 
quite absurd, of course, to only permit world ; that it probably has more pheas- 
breeders to sell elk and deer, since the ants of certain species than China, where 
antelope needs their money and protec- the pheasants are indigenous: and that 
tion far more than the elk and deer do. soon we will be the biggest pheasant pro- 
It is absurd to encourage the saving and ducing country in the world, 
production of pheasants and common Forest and Stream will be surprised to 
wild ducks only while the indigenous learn that our ruffed grouse soon will be 
grouse, quail and wild turkeys need the abundant and cheap in our markets, and 
attention of breeders far more than the also the quail, prairie grouse, wild tur- 
pheasants and the ducks do. keys and other game, during long open 

Some States now permit the breeding seasons. We know a number of places 

and the marketing of all species of game where there are as many ouail per acre 

and we have advised the owners of quail as is desirable; more would probably re- 

and grouse that we will sell their birds suit in diseases due to over-crowding, 

for them at excellent prices even if the We know places where there is an 

people of New York are not permitted abundance of ruffed grouse in the woods 

to eat the native food as the people in and where the shooting is good every 

more civilized States can. The Hotel season. 

Men's Associations of the State and City The delay in making the indigenous 

of New York and the game dealers are grouse and quail plentiful in many places 

entitled to much credit for seeing the has been due to game laws preventing 

new statute safely in the books. We the shooting of decent bags and the sale 

have congratulated them privately and f the birds by those who look after 

we now wish to publicly thank them. All them properly. 

intelligent sportsmen and game breeders Ruffed grouse and quail can be pro- 
favored the amendment and many let- duced in big numbers much cheaper than 
ters went to Albany from our readers, pheasants can be produced since easily 
including State game officers in other they are handled in a wild state. There 
States. Credit, of course, is due the should be some incentive, however, to do 
magazine chiefly for suggesting that an t he necessarv work, which, briefly stated, 
end be put to the legal nonsense. As we } s the protection of the birds from their 



THE GAME BREEDER 



55 



natural enemies; the planting of some 
additional covers and foods where this 
is necessary and the feeding of the game 
in winter. 

In a very short time we will have all 
the native birds we wish to eat at reason- 
able prices ; possibly we may have to go 
outside of New York to eat the wild 
turkeys, produced by industry for a short 
time, but we have a notion that common 
sense rapidly is being revived and that 
this is really all that is needed, besides 
the "revolution of thought," called for 
by the dean of sportsmen. 

Take a walk through the markets next 
fall, dear Forest and Stream, and look 
at the thousands of imported black cocks 
offered for sale. These birds are some- 
what similar in their habits to our ruffed 
grouse, and we have a big area suitable 
for grouse, to say nothing about the vast 
Canadian forests. And Canada is wak- 
ing up as numerous letters from Canad- 
ian members of the Game Conservation 
Society indicate. 



which is said to be vanishing soon will 
be plentiful and cheap. Very little com- 
paratively of the posted lands will be 
needed to produce such results. 



PARTRIDGES AND HARES. 

We print in this issue two stories by 
Captain C. E. Radcliffe, from Shooting 
in order that our readers may learn how 
easy it is to make the partridges and 
hares tremendously abundant without 
any expensive artificial rearing "in cap- 
tivity." The thousands of partridges 
and hares were produced simply by de- 
stroying their enemies and feeding them 
in winter. 

The prairie grouse and quails and our 
numerous hares and rabbits can be made 
and kept abundant, although thousands 
be shot and sent to market, as soon as 
we know how and are not in danger of 
being arrested for food producing. The 
laws rapidly are being made right in 
many States. Soon we will open the 
New York market to quail and grouse 
and soon these birds will swarm as they 
formerly did on suitable areas. We pre- 
dict in manv places they will be far more 
p 1 entiful than they ever were. We 
should send the thousands of dollars 
which we now send abroad, for black 
cocks and other game birds, to the Amer- 
ican breeders. Quickly they will use the 
money to good advantage and the game 



CORRESPONDENCE- 

The Game Conservation Society: 

Of the several magazines I take I look 
forward to the coming of The Game 
Breeder with the most genuine interest 
and satisfaction, so I cannot afford to 
miss a copy. I have not yet received 
the April number. 

H. C. Shaney. 
Chicago, Ills. 

Game Conservation Society: 

I have the letter of your Secretary of 
the 13th inst. and am very glad to have 
such advice as is given therein, but I 
would like to know more. 

In the first place I get the idea from 
reading your magazine that Illinois is 
taboo territory for game raising and sale. 
I assume you mean the latter. Of course, 
I presume a man could raise all the 
game he wanted to if he did not kill it 
for sale. Since you must know the laws 
of the various States, advise me on this 
point and what you think it would be 
necessary or desirable to do to overcome 
such law if existing. 

Further advise me how to proceed to 
get up a garrfe breeding preserve and 
what the experience of those who make 
such efforts has been. Anything which 
you can say which will throw light upon 
the subject and give me encouragement,, 
will be gratefully received. 
Most sincerely, 

G. A. Stephens. 

Illinois. 

It is impossible to answer by mail, in 
detail, the thousands of enquiries which 
come to the Society. We have long since 
ceased to advise what the game laws are 
in the different States. The laws are 
changed so often that no one is safe in 
saying what they are at any particular 
time. Most of the States issue booklets 
containing the State game laws and we 
suggest that you write to the Game Com- 
missioner and get a copy of the laws. 

We do attempt to keep up with the 



56 



THE GAME BREEDER 



laws in so far as they relate to game 
breeders, and we are pleased to state that 
over two-thirds of the states now per- 
mit the profitable breeding of all. or cer- 
tain species of game. We publish brief 
abstracts of these laws from time to time 
after the law mills have ceased their 
activities for the year. 

A man as you say, certainly can raise 
all the game he wants to, but as we have 
pointed out, often, he will not be apt to 
do so in States which prohibit quail 
shooting for five or ten years or prohibit 
him from shooting more than three cock 
pheasants in a season, and where similar 
restrictions are applied to other species. 
Our contention is that he should decide 
how many birds he will shoot in a season 
and how many it is necessary to leave 
for a breeding stock. He should decide 
how many he will sell to help pay the 
■cost of production. These ideas have 
been incorporated in the game breeders' 
•enactments, many of which were written 
in the office of The Game Breeder, in 
whole or in part. 

We regret that as a new subscriber 
you have not seen the scores of articles 
about the game clubs, game farms and 
individual preserves (many of them illu- 
strated) which we have published from 
time to time in The Game Breeder. New 
■clubs and preserves are being started all 
the time and many individual breeders 
now breed game in large and small num- 
bers. We shall print many more stories 
about the successful clubs and about the 
game farms and small breeders. These 
will describe what they are doing and 
now they do it. 

The story of the Woodmont Club and 
a subsequent article by its secretary, who 
owns a wild turkey preserve, contained 
much valuable information about the 
breeding and shooting of wild turkeys. 
Miss Mary Wilkie, who advertises wild 
turkeys in The Game Breeder, contrib- 
uted two interesting articles about the 
Dreeding of these birds. In the stories 
about the Game Breeders' Association, 
the Clove Valley Club, the Blooming 
Grove Club, the Wyandanch Club, the 
Middle Island Club, and others which 
nave an abundance of game, the writers 
•described the breeding operations and 



the good shooting. Many small breeders 
and game farmers h^ve written their ex- 
periences. There will be many more of 
these stories since many of our readers 
who are successful have . promised to 
write short articles which we will print 
from time to time. Some of . the clubs 
and individual preserve owners now 
shoot thousands of quail every season. 

Some of the States only permit the 
profitable breeding of pheasants, ducks 
and deer. Others permit the breeding of 
all species. 

In answer to your inquiry as to "how 
to proceed to get up a game breeding 
preserve," we can only say that we have 
had so many requests for such informa- 
tion that we have decided to publish sev- 
eral articles on this subject and these 
will be supplemented by many stories 
about what the preserve owners and 
game farmers are doing and how they 
do it. These stories will be written by 
those who are successful in having 
splendid shooting and who sell some of 
the game to pay the cost of rearing it. 

Mr. Brigham, who. wrote the story 
about the Clove Valley Club which an- 
nually shoots thousands of pheasants and 
ducks, said that if the club had been 
run purely as a commercial enterprise it 
would have cleared thousands of dollars. 

We hope to begin the series of articles 
about how to organize game clubs and 
shooting syndicates in the June issue and 
we shall reprint some of the facts from 
the articles referred to because many 
new readers are asking for information 
about those already in the game. 

We are quite sure you will agree with 
us now that most of the farms are 
posted and the tendency of our legisla- 
tion is to put an end to sport by pro- 
hibiting shooting at all times Or for terms 
of years, that those who arrange with 
the farmers so that they can shoot big 
bags of game during long open seasons 
and sell some of the game, thereby mak- 
ing the people friendly to sport, are 
doing a great public service. 

The necessity for individual action is 
presented in a booklet on "Game Farm- 
ing for Profit and Pleasure," issued by 
the Hercules Powder Company. This 
booklet is for free distribution, and it is 



THE GAME BREEDER 



57 



doing much towards making the country 
a big game producing country, as it 
should be. 

The Game Breeder: 

With reference to your correspondent 
who wishes information regarding Blue 
Pit Games, will say I am a game fancier, 
with a taste for the rare and unusual, 
and while the blue variations are com- 
paratively common, such as Blue Red, 
Blue Grey, Blue Pyle and Blue Spangle, 
I have only found one man out of hun- 
dreds of correspondents who claims to 
have the genuine Blue Pit Games. 

Your inquirer should address Dr. R. 
Armfield, Marshville, N. C. 
Very respectfully, 

C. N. McElhany. 

Texas. 

• 

Some Unsolicited and Appreciated 
Remarks. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

Our once-run advertisement in The 
Game Breeder made a nearly complete 
clean-up of our offerings — 3 dogs and all 
the game egg orders we could handle, at 
a cost of less than 1 per cent, for the 
advertising. 

T. W. Ingersoll. 

Buffalo, Minnesota. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

Please take my advertisement out of 
The Game Breeder. I have sold all my 
surplus stock and still orders are coming 
which I can not fill. 

CHERRY FARM, 
A. J. Appleby. 
Chester, New Jersey. 

Editor Game Breeder : 

Your may discontinue my deer ad. , It 
sold all the deer and I do not wish to be 
obliged to answer the many letters which 
are still coming. F. A. F. 

Illinois. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

That ad. did all the work. Letters be- 
gan coming at once. I had lots of in- 
quiries and ..quickly sold all the wild tur- 
keys and eggs I could spare * * * 



Before closing I must say how the re- 
sults have encouraged me and how proud 
I am of shipping eggs at such a price. 

Mary C. Wilkie. 
Beaver Dam, Virginia. 



The New Law for New York. 

[The following new law for New York is 
important for non-resident game breeders. It 
should add $5 to the value of every acre used 
for game and probably more.— Editor.] 

Section 377. Certain mammals and birds 
may be imported from without the State and 
sold. Any person engaged in the business of 
raising and selling domesticated American elk, 
whitetail deer, European red deer and fallow 
deer, roebuck, pheasants, mallard ducks and 
black ducks, or any of them, in a wholly en- 
closed preserve or entire island, of which he 
is the owner or lessee, under a breeder's law 
providing for the tagging of all preserve bred 
game and otherwise similar in principle to the 
law of the State of New York in such case 
made and provided, may make application in 
writing to the commission for a permit to im- 
port such mammals or birds into the State of 
New York and sell the same. In the event 
that the commission shall be satisfied that the 
said mammals and birds are bred in captivity 
and are killed and tagged under a breeding 
law similar in principle to that of the State of 
New York, upon the payment of a fee of five 
dollars, together with such additional sum as 
the commissioner, may determine to cover the 
necessary cost of inspection, the commission 
may in its discretion issue a revocable permit 
in writing to such applicant to import such 
mammals and birds raised as aforesaid into 
the State of New York and to sell the same, 
in which case the provisions of sections three 
hundred and seventy-two, three hundred and 
seventy-three and three hundred and seventy- 
four of the conservation law, in so far as the 
same are applicable, shall apply. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect im- 
mediately." 

* 

A Bait Shortage. 

The Master (taking the class on the 
subject of the Deluge) : "You remarked 
that Noah couldn't spend very much time 
fishing while in the Ark. What makes 
you think so?" 

Experienced Scholar : "Because there 
were only two worms in the Ark, sir." — 
Melbourne Leader. 



It should be legal everywhere to trap 
birds for propagation under permits- 
from the State on wild lands and with- 
out permits on. the private^ lands owned 
by game breeders. 



58 THE GAME. BREEDER 



Game Breeders' Supplies 



WIRE - COOPS - TRAPS 

Wire 

For Deer Parks, Rearing Fields and Kennels 

Coops and Hatching Boxes 

Traps 

For Ground and Winged Vermin 

Egg Turners, Egg Boxes for Shipping 

And all Appliances for Game Farms and Preserves 



I shall be pleased to correspond with game breeders 
who wish to purchase wire, coops, traps or any appli- 
ances for the game farm and preserve. 

Special advice given to all contemplating the game 
breeders' industry. 



F. T. OAKES 

Room 622 
ISO Nassau Street New York, U. S. A. 

I do not sell live deer and game birds, or egg* 



In writing to advertisers pleese mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



59 



THE PORTAGE HEIGHTS GAME FARM 

ROBERT J. McPHAIL, Head Keeper 
Portage Heights, Akron, Ohio 

Ring-Necked Pheasants Eggs For Sale 

For delivery prior to May 1 5, $25.00 per hundred For delivery after May 15, $20.00 per hundred 

$3.00 per dozen 

All our pheasant hens are mated with imported cocks. 

Distributers of PHEASANT GERMICIDE for the United States, A COOP of 15 CHICKS, one day oil, with 
HEN, COOP and FEED and GERMICIDE enough to rear to 6 weeks old, including instructions, for $13.00. 



J. R. G AMMETER, 



Portage Heights, Akron, Ohio 



OUR FEATHERED GAME 

A manual on American Game 
Birds with shooting illustrations in 
color, and bird portraits of all 
American Game Birds. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of The Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, MANAGE- 
MENT, CIRCULATION, ETC., REQUIRED BY THE 
llACT OF CONGRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912, OF 
THE GAME BREEDER FOR APRIL 1st, i Ql 6. 
Published Monthly at 150 Nassau Street, 
New York City. 

Publishers — The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 150 

Nassau Street, New York, N. Y. 
Editor— D. W. Huntington, 150 Nassau St., New York, N.Y 
Managing Editor — None. 
Business Managers — The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 

150 Nassau Street, New York. N. Y. 
Owners — The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
Stockholders— C. B. Davis, Grantwood, N. J. ; F. R. 

Peixotto. 55 John Street. New York, N. Y. ; A. A. 

Hill, 71 Murray Street, New York, N. Y. ; D. W. 

Huntington, 150 Nassau Street, New York, N. Y. ; 

J. C. Huntington, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 
Known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security 
holders owning or holding 1 per cent or more of total 
amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities: None. 
D. W. Huntington, Editor. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 28th day of 
March, igi6. 
U- s.] (Signed) George F. Bentley, 

Notary Public, New York County. 
<My commission expires March 30th, iqi6.) 



MBS*. 


BOOK ON 


MmB 


DOG DISEASES 


^P 


And How to Feed 


America's 

Pioneer 

Dog Remedies 


Mailed free to any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY GLOVER, V. S. 
118 West 31st Street, New York 



Wild Duck Eggs 

From good strain. Strong on the wing. 
Write for Prices to 

ADAM SCOTT, Gamekeeper 

froh-Heim Game & Poultry Yards 

FAR HILLS, N. J. 



M allard Egg s 

Mallard Duck Eggs by the dozen or 

hundred. Our stock has free 

range and are flyers. 



Buckstaff Farm 

Oshkosh - Wisconsin 



THE AMATEUR TRAINER 

By Ed. F. Haberlein 

A practical trainer of over 30 years' experience, whose 
system is up to date and stands uneqnaled. 

JVew Edition fust Oat. Illustrated. 
A plain, practical and concise, yet thorough guide 
in the art of training, handling and the correcting 
of faults of the bird do? subservient to the gun 
afield. Written especially for the novice, but 
equally valuable to the experienced handler. By 
following the instructions plainly given, every 
shooter possessed of a little common sense and 
patience can train his own dogs to perfection. 

Paper cover, $1.00; best full cloth binding and gold 
embossed, $1.50. Address 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 



60 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



LIVE GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE PHOENIX FOWL 
Egas ior sale; several varieties. S V. REEVES, 114 
E. Park Ave., Haddonfield, N. J. 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEEGE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding- this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country. Black and White 
Swans.Wild Ducks, etc , for sale. WHE ALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. ; (iot) 

BRED FEMALE MINK, SKUNKS, FOXES. OPOS- 
SUMS Pigeons, dogs. Particulars free. TARMAN, 
Box G, Quincy, Penna. 

FOR SALE BUFFALO AND ELK IN CAR LOAD 
lots or single. Deer, Antelope, Beaver. Mink, Mountain 
Lion, Pheasants and Game Birds. Eggs in season. 
KENDRICK PHEASANTRIES, Coronado Building, 
Denver Colorado. 7-/6 

WILD MALLARD DECOYS— RAISED ON LICENSED 
Wisconsin game farm. Birds $1.50 each, eggs $1.50 
per 12. Going fast, don't delay. E. G. SHOWERS, 
Onalaska, Wis. 

5 VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. Wild Mallards, 
Wild Geese and game. Fourteen varieties of stand- 
ard Poultry, including Turkeys. Also Elk. List free. 
G. H HARRIS, Taylorville, 111. 

GOLDEN AND ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANT 

eggs for hatching. May to August. W. S. ALLISON, 

Merri mac port, Mass 7-76 

PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW, 
ing prices: Mallards. $3.00 per pair. Pintails, $2.50 per 
pair. Green Wing'Teal, $4.00 per pair. Blue Wirg Teal, 
$3 00 per pair. Also reJheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices; for propa- 
gating and. scientific, purposes.. GEORGE J. KLEIN,. 
Ellin wood, Kansas. 

FOR SALE-PAIR GOLDEN, PAIR SILVER PHEAS- 

ants, $5.00 each this month. Mallard ducks, $5 00 per 

pair, eggs $2.00 per dozen. Stamp for inquiry. A S. 

COOPER, Howell. Mich. 3-16 

GOLDEN PHEASANTS— $10.00 A PAIR. EGGS 30c 

each. FRAN KLIN J. PITTS, 14 Webster St., Taunton, 

Mass j-ib 



SAN LORENZO GAME FARM — BREEDER OF 
all kinds of pheasants; eggs in season ; also birds 
for sale at all times Visitors welcome. Write for 
price list. Mrs S. MATTHIESSEN, San Lorenzo, 
Alameda Co., California. y-ib 



CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATED PHEASANT BREED. 
ERS. Pheasants, Quail, Mallard price list. FRED D. 
HOYT, Hayward, Cal. 

GAME EGGS 

RING NECK PHEASANT EGGS FROM CHOICE 

stock. Order now for early delivery $2 50 per setting 

of is eggs. EDWARD W. DOLAN, Wortbington. 

Minn. 5-* 6 

WILD MALLARD DUCK EGGS— APRIL TO MAY 

15, 1916, $15.00 per hundred. May. 16 to July 5. 1916, 
$12 00 per bunded. Safely packed (send draft!. Order 
at once. First come, first served (no limit, no discount). 
C. BREMAN CO., Danville, Illinois. 

ORDERS FOR RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS FOR 
season 1916 — Fine heahhy stock; — Birds not related — 
Price $3.50 for 15. DR. HOLMAN, Attleboro, Mass. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE; STRICTLY FRESH 
and fertile. I am now booking orders for spring and 
summer. Amherst, Golden, Silver. GRAY PHEAS- 
ANTRIES, Ward Street, Orange, New Jersey. 

EGGS FROM RINGNECK PHEASANTS, MALLARD 

ducks. All the popular breeds of high grade chkkens. 

MILL ROAD POUT TRY FARM. Apple Grove. 

Virginia. 5-16 

WILD MALLARD DUCK EGGS FOR SALE-FROM 

wild stock this season ; also Ring-Neck Pheasant eg^s. 
From largest breeding farm in the south. H A. BEASLEVj, 
Carroll Island Club, Continental Trust Building, Balti- 
more, Md. 

WILD MALLARD EGGS FROM CHOICE STOCK, 

bred under natural surroundings. May, 15c. ; June and 

later, 12c. ROY E. McFEE, Canajoharie, R. D. No. 2.N.Y. 

ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANT AND WHITE 
Guinea eggs, very reasonable. Address HIRSCH 
POULTRY YARDS, Lyons, 111. 

WILD AND BRONZE TURKEY EGGS, CHICKEN 
eggs. Handsome catalog showing pure wild gobbler 
from the mountain. VALLEY VIEW POULTRY FARM, 
Belleville, Pa. 

MALLARD EGGS. FROM SELECT WINNERS, 
$3.50 per 13, $25.00 per hundred ; from utility stock, $2 00 
per 13, $15.00 per hundred. Early eggs bring better re- 
sults Enter order now. CLYDE B. TERRELL, Natur- 
alist. Dept. P2, Oshkosh, Wis. 

RINGNECK PHEASANTS, EGGS FOR SALE AT 
$2.00 a dozen. ISAAC SPENCER, 10 Wayne Ave. 

Ipswich, Mass. 

FOR SALE— WILD MALLARD DUCK EGGS, $18. 
per hundred. Also English Ringneck Pheasants Eggs. 
$25. per hundred. All eggs from good, strong stock. Apply 
to JOSEPH E. ASHBY, Manager, Dudley Road, Bedford, 
Mass. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATC H I NG-Chinese ring- 
neck $3.00 per dozen, $20.00 per hundred; Golden $4.00 
per dozen, Silver $5.00 per dozen, Reeves $7.00 per dozen. 
OREGON BIRD & PHEASANT FARM, Beaverton, 
Oregon. ,..-... j. 

RINGNECK, SILVER AND GOLDEN PHEASANT 
eggs for sale. Pure stock and fresh eggs only. Reason- 
able. W. L. EDISON, Morristown, Ni J. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: •'Yours for M°re Game. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



61 



game: birds wanted 

WANTED— MONGOLIAN AND R1NGNECK PHEAS- 
ANTS and deer for breeding. Also, cub bear" Give 
description and prices. CLARE WILLARD/ Allegany. 
New York. 

WANTED— "WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX, 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

WANTED— FANCY AVIARY PHEASANTS, RING- 
necks, peacocks, partridges, quail, prairie chickens, 
wood and mandarin ducks. Quote prices. ROBERT 
HUTCHINSON, Littleton, Colo 

DEER WANTED— Wanted, one pair of adult fallow deer. 
State price. A C. C, care of The Game Breeder, 130 
Nassau St., N. Y. City. 

WANTED — 250 to 300 YOUNG WILD MALLARD 

Ducks. August or September delivery. State best price, 

terms and particulars. I. W. ENGLAND, Passaic, N. J. 



GAMEKEEPERS 

SITUATION WANTED-HEAD GAMEKEEPER OR 
Superintendent of large estate or game preserve. Very 
capable man to show sport. Thoroughly experienced 
rearing pheasants, partridge, quail and wild ducks. 
Management of incubators hatching pheasant and duck 
eggs. Also breeding, training and handling high class 
shooting dogs. Excellent trapper, competent manager. 
Reference present employer. GAMEKEEPER, 157 East 
6qth St., New York. 

GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION. UNDER- 

stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 

this country. Address M. F. care of The Game Breeder, 

150 Nassau Street. New York. 

WANTED— SOBER, INDUSTRIOUS. EXPERIENCED 
man to raise Pheasants and Turkeys. Will pay a moderate 
salary and liberal share of profits. Address giving full 
details of qualifications. CHAS. B. WOOD, Hadlyme, 
Conn. 

UNDERKEEPER— WANTED A GOOD MAN WHO 
thoroughly understand* pheasant rearing, willing and 
obliging. Age about 24 years. Send full particular* of 
references to REARER, care of The Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St , New Vork City 7-16 



WANTED— SITUATION 
As Superintendent or Manager on a game farm or 
preserve. Experienced in game and poultry breeding. 
Good reason for desiring change of location. Would 
take an interest in a game farm to breed game com- 
mercially. Address C. McM., office of The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York City. 



REAL ESTATE 



GAME BREEDING FARM WANTED 
Wanted to purchase or rent a small place in one 
of the Eastern States where game breeding is legal. 
A small farm with a pond and stream is desired. 
State price and location. M. A. C, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



BUNGALOW FOR SALE OR RENT 

HAVE WELL BUILT BUNGALOW IN THE MOUN- 
tains of Ulster Co., N.Y., 2 hours from N.Y.City and half- 
hour from Poughkeepsie. Bungalow contains 6 rooms, 
?;ood artesian well and first-clats outbuildings. Will rent 
urnisbed or unfurnished for the comingsummer. Address 
E. DAYTON, 26 Bergen Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 

WANTED PARTNER— TO TAKE AN INTEREST 
in a deer park and preserve near New York. 150 acres 
fenced with eif ht foot fence, containing deer and an 
abundance of ruffed grouse. Two trout streams and 
splendid water for wild duck breeding. G. B.. care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 



FOODS 



WHITE'S PRESERVE— WILD CELERY AND ALL 
kinds of wild duck food, plants and seeds. Also enter- 
tain sportsmen. Waterlily, Currituck Sound, North Caro- 
lina^ . 

WILD DUCKS' NATURAL FOODS Will attract 
them. These foods collected, examinations made, plant- 
ings planned and superintended. Write for free Infor- 
mation. CLYDE B TERRELL, Specialist on the Natural 
Foods of Wild Ducks, Dept. Pi, Oshkosh, Wis 

MEAL WORMS FOR BIRDS, FOR SALE BY THE 
hundred or in large quantities. 25c. per hundred. Write 
for prices for larger lots. WM. STOFFREGN, 124-126 
4th Ave.. New York City. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

"PHEASANT FARMING," AN ILLUSTRATED 
practical booklet on pheasant rearing, postpaid, fifty 
cents Circular, all necessary pheasant equipment free. 
SIMPSON'S PHEASANT FARM, Corvallis, Oregon. 

REARING PHEASANTS IN SMALL ENCLOSURES. 
Price, 20 Cents. It contains nothing that has not been 
thoroughly and successfully tried out in actual practice. 
S. V. REEVES, Haddonfield, N. T. ' . 

SEND 25 CENTS FOR INFORMATION AND PRICE 
list of the most profitable furbearing animal, the Black 
Siberian Hare. SIBERIAN HARE CO., Hamilton, 
Canada. 

BLACK SIBERIAN HARE; $10 per pair, $15 per trio. 
JOHN W. TALBOT, South Bend, Indiana. 

DOGS 

NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
'English bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds, American fox- 
hounds, lion, cat. deer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. All 
trained. Shippedon trial. Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded Purchaser to decide. Fifty page highly 
illustrated catalogue, 5c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, tox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin 

A PAIR OF THOROUGHLY BROKEN CHESAPEAKE 
Bay Duck Retrievers, (Dog and Bitch, no relation). 
Pedigreed and Registered. Trained and used by a market 
gunner. Have retrieved hundreds of ducks, broken to 
boat, marsh and blind shooting ; few dogs their equal as 
duck retrievers. Price 8150. each. JOHN SLOAN, Lee 
Hall, Va . 

AIREDALE PUPPIES. BEST BREEDING, MANY 
champions in pedigree. Also Golden Pheasant Eggs. 
MRS. A. E. THOMPSON, Williamsburg, Va. 

CHESAPEAKE BAY DUCK RETRIEVERS. PEDI- 

greed. best hunting stock in America. Guaranteed not 

gun-shy. Puppies for sale. JOHN SLOAN, Lee Hall, Va. 




The Best In 
Pointers 

Puppies, Broken Dogs 

and Brood Bitches, by 

Champion Comanche 

Frank, Fishel's Frank 

and Champion Nicholas 

R. 

Write ne your wants, picnic. 

U. R. FISHCL 

Box 35 HOPE, IND. 



In wi-Mag %m advertisers aleaae sniw The Game Breader or tigs your letters: "Yours far Mas* Game." 



62 



THE GAME BREEDER 



GAME BIRDS 

TOR PROPAGATING PURPOSES 

Genuine Wild Mallards, Black Duck, Green-wing and Blue- 
wing Teal, Pintails, Gadwalls, Shovellers, Wood Duck, Widgeon, 
Red- heads, Blue-bills, also a few pairs of extra choice Canvas-backs 
and Ring-bills; Canadian, Greater and Lesser Snow, Ross, Brant, 
Hutchins, Cackling and Blue Geese, supplied for propagating 
purposes. Finest quality in the country. 

Golden, Silver, Amherst, Reeves Pheasants at reasonable prices. 
1 also am booking orders for ring-neck Pheasants reared on my 
preserve for delivery in early fall. 

I also have rare land and waterfowl from all parts of the world. 
Prices quoted for the asking. 

JOHN HEYWOOD, Gardner, Mass. 

Farms for the Propagation of Wild Fowl. 



Wild Mallard Eggs 

From Select Stock: 

$25.00 per 100 
3,50 per 13 




From Utility Stock: v - 
; :__ '.ClydfeJB. Terrell . 

Oshkosh - Wisconsin 



All eggs from the very finest stock 
obtainable. Mated to non-related males 
to insure a high degree of fertility. 

Greatest possible vitality in young 
stock. 



Until May 1 5th 

Ringneck and Mallard Eggs, 
$25.00 a hundred 

Mongolian, $40.00 a hundred 



. Packed in special crates to 
insure safe arrival. 

RIVER LAWN FARM 

147-153 West Mohawk St., BUFFALO, N. Y. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



63 



mmm 




Mallards — Drakes — Ducks — Eggs 

FOR SALE AT ATTRACTIVE PRICES 

The birds are strong on the wing. The eggs are gathered 
dail} 7 and are shipped promptly. 



ROBERT ALBIN 

ISLIP, LONG ISLAND - - NEW YORK 



We Offer for 
Immediate Delivery 

Silver, Goldens, Ringnecks, Lady Amhersts, 
Reeves, Elliotts, Mongolians, Swinhoes.Versicolors, 
Impeyans, Manchurian Eared and Melanotus 
Pheasants. We are now booking orders for eggs 
for Spring and Summer delivery of any of the above 
varieties. We quote Ringneck eggs $3.50 per 
dozen, $25.00 per hundred ; Green head mallard 
eggs $3.50 per dozen. $25.00 per hundred. Also ; 
Peafowl and' Wila Turkey 'Eggs. We •also 
offer for sale Single Comb buff and Blue Orping- 
tons, Rhode Island Reds, Japanese Silkies and 
Longtails. Wild Turkeys, Blue, White Japanned and 
Specifier Peafowls, as well as the following Ducks : 
Greenhead and black mallard, pintail, redhead, 
gadwall, wood, mandarin and Formosan teal, 
shovelers, baidpafe and Slue Bill and 'gf-eeri wing 
teal. 

WANTED 

White and Java Peafowls. In Pheasants, any 
of the trajopans. firebacks, cheer, sommering, 
Elliotts, white crested Kalij, Peacocks. Anderson's 
Lineatus, Golden Eye, Greater Scaup, Old 
Squa-w-, -Batter ba44-and-Gaf-gany-BucfeSi Ateo -Ring^ 
Teal. Tn writing" quote number, sex arid lowest 
cash price. 

Send 30 cents in stamps for our new igi6 color- 
type catalogue of pheasants and,rearing of pheasr 
ants^. If you do not Jike it .return in 48 hours jafaer 
receiving, and your' money refunded ; and if you 
make a purchase of us to the amount of $5.00 you 
can deduct price of eclogue.. '.. . -. - ■■. 



CHILES 

-ffctocmt Steirflrl^r 



& CO. 

"*~ ^Kentucky 



Wild Duck foods 

SAGO POND WEED AND OTHERS 

If you wish to grow a wild duck food, 
that will grow anywhere except in salt 
water, and the very best duck food 
known,: plant Sago Pond Weed, roots or 
seed. ' We will refer you to people who 
are growing it abundantly, and they 
will tell you how it has improved their 
shooting. Sago is what; has held the 
ducks, geese 'and swans in Currituck for 
the past 90 years, where they have been 
shot at more than any other place in 
American. 

• z We 2featb\p:wftd^rery- roots and 
seeds. Chara, Widgeon grass roots, Red 
head grass and Wild rice roots. We will 
-not ship Wild rice ntcd: v ■ * -- :_ 

JASPER B. WHITE 

-WATE RUtAV -GURRIT.UCK- SOUN Dr -ffc~ C: 



64 THE GAME BREEDER 



PHEASANTS, DUCKS AND EGGS 

Deer And Other Live Game 

FOR SAIvE, a superb lot of Golden, Silver and Amherst pheasants just 
right for breeding this spring and summer. 

I am now booking orders for eggs of the following varieties: Mon- 
golian, Ringneck, Chinese, Golden, Silver, Amherst and Reeves. 

Wood Duck, Mallard and Gray Call Duck eggs. 

All the eggs I ship are guaranteed to be from non-related, pure 
bred, strong, healthy birds, correctly mated; all eggs are guaranteed not to 
be over three days old when they leave my farm. 

I also manufacture a full line of special foods for the successful raising 
of young pheasants and wild water fowl, also for feeding the old birds 
all the year 'round; write for prices. 

WALLACE EVANS GAME PARM, ST. CHARLES, ILL 

Largest and most successful breeders of pheasants, 
wild water fowl, deer, etc., in the world. 



STONY LONESOME GAME FARM 

Mallard Ducks and 
Mongolian Pheasants 

We offer for immediate delivery (limited number) of 

Mallard Ducks and Mongolian Pheasants 

and will take orders for eggs, delivery in the spring. 



ADDRESS 

12S Front Street, New York City, 

or JOHN FOSTER, West Hartland, Connecticut 

lit writing t*> advertisers plea** mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Youn for Mart Ctat." 



Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
Partridges and Pheasants. 





i C^V ,,-rtS^< 



Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Royal Swans of England. 1 have fine lot of ihe beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES. PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have fiO acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS, RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay you to do bo. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New Vork and 30 mile6 from Philadelphia. 



SaCJ^is :«" 1§B9 


IS* " " 

i-' * ' 








iff 


<*9 

1A- 




X - - 




JK"^ 


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WBBB)^^ . 



Department V. 



WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 



r : 



Any Game Breeder with a limited amount 
of knowledge can hatch pheasant chicks but 
it takes experience to rear them successfully. 

If you have been disap- 
pointed in even a limited 
degree it is probably due 
to the fact that you are 
not using the right kind 
of foods. 

Have your poults died 
at an early age? If so, 
use in future, SPRATT'S 
PHEASANT MEAL and 
watch results. 

Have they grown strong and healthy? If not, feed SPRATT'S 
PHEASANT MEAL and watch results. 

Are the old birds strong and vigorous? If not, try SPRATT'S 
PHEASANT FOOD and watch results. 

If eggs are scarce and infertile, feed SPRATT'S PHEASANT 
FOOD and watch results. 




SPRATT'S 



REMEMBER THAT 

PRAIRIE 
MEAT 



"CRISSEL" 



is a perfect substitute for insect life and ants' eggs, also that it is 
the purest form of meat obtainable. 



Send 25c. for " Pheasant Culture," giving full instructions in 
regard to the proper use of Spratt's Foods, also many valuable hints 
about rearing semi-wild birds, etc. 

If interested in dogs send 2c stamp for ' ' Dog Culture." ' ' Poultry 
Culture " mailed on receipt of 10c. 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 



L. 



NEWARK, N. J. 



^ 



j 



(MAR 12 1921 




>1°° PerYear 




GAHF 



T H Er 




VOL. IX. 



■"" WrIi -f 1 



JUNE, 1916 



No. 3 




The- Object of this magazine- is 
to Make- North America the 5iggest 
GaheProducing Country in the World 









unnn 



THE" GAME- CONSERVATION SOCIETY. Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.i.* 

l'll''l»"'l''''"IIM»llllllllll''ll"llll»llll'lll'll'llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ll)IIIIMIIIIlBlUlli 












V^; 



£] 



REMINGTON 
UMC 



KSTC 



<%l 



'/y* 



% 






>v^v 



3**1 



£$ 



■z^#z&\ 






rWS 



When a Covey Flushes with a W^hir-r-r 
at Your Feet—- 

or the trap toy rings in an unexpected angle on 
you — it's a moment to make a man glad ot the 

"Speed Shells" in his gun— Remington UMC 

steel lined smokeless shells. 

Sportsmen everywhere are noting the consistently 
satisfactory shooting results achieved every day with. 
"Arrow" and "Nitro Club" shells at traps and afield. 
There are thousands of good old guns and new that 
mean much more to their owners since the change from 
ordinary shells to Remington UMC 

The steel lining makes the main difference. It 
grips the powder and keeps all the drive of the explo- 
sion right behind the charge— the fastest shot shells in 
the world. 

You'll find the Remington UMC "Arrow" and 
"Nitro Club" smokeless shells and the "New Club* 
Hack powder shells at Sportsmen's Headquarters in 
every town— the dealer who displays the Red Ball 
JVlark of Remington UMC. 

THE REMINGTON ARMS UNION METALLIC 
CARTRIDGE COMPANY 

Largest Manufacturers of Firearms and Ammunition in tnt World 
Woolworth Building, New York 



THE GAME BREEDER 



65 




When There Is Game 
Enough For Al! 

The day is coming when there will 
be as much wild game in this country 
as there was fifty years ago. Men now 
living can remember the time when 
the sky was darkened by the flight of 
wild ducks, when wild turkeys, quail, 
grouse and other game birds abounded 
in our woods and fields. It does not 
take a great effort of imagination to 
picture what a return of these condi- 
tions will mean— not only to the sportsman but also 
to the farmer, the housewife and the market man. 

Game farming is the medium through which the change 
will be brought about. By the establishment of game farms 
throughout the country it will be possible not only to meet 
the present active demand for game birds (now far larger 
than the supply) but also the increased demand which 
will come. 

Game breeding is both profitable and pleasant. Any one 
having a small amount of land may start a game farm and 
raise birds for his own consumption and for sporting and 
marketing purposes. 

If these possibilities appeal to you, or if you are > interested 
from any standpoint in the increase of our game birds, write 
us for the book, "Game Farming for Profit and Pleasure". 
This book, which is sent without cost to those who ask for 
it, takes up the subject in a broad way and gives much 
interesting and valuable information regarding many different 
game birds, their habits, food, enemies, and the methpds for 
breeding and marketing them. 

In writing for your copy please use the coupon below. 



Game Breeding Department, Room 200 

HEHfULES POWDER CO. 

Wilmington, Delaware 

Manufacturers of Explosives; Infallible and "E. C" Smokeless Sbotgun Powders; 
L.4R. Orange Extra Black Sporting Powders; Dynamite for Farming' ■ 









Game Breeding Dept., Room 200 

Hercules Powder Company, Wilmington, Del. 

Gentlemen: — Please send me a copy of "Game Farming for Profit and Pleasure". I am interested in game 

breeding from the standpoint of ... .. r 

Name....^. i_i - - - - - 

Address ».*,.:..... .. . ....... a 









66 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

A Practical Book on the Breeding of Wild Fowl 
for Sport and for Profit 

With Numerous Illustrations. 

Contains chapters on the Preservation of Snipe and Woodcock. 

Many readers of the Game Breeder have bred thousands of Wild Ducks 
by following the instructions in this book. 



DUCK BREEDING IS PROFITABLE. 



PRICE, $1.50; Special Signed Edition, $2.00. 



THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, New York 



Heating and Cooking Stoves for 
Clubs and Cottages 



The Camp Cook Stove 

This is an ideal cook stove for the 
Mining, Lumber and Military 
Camps; will work just as well in 
the open air as indoors. . 

Construction Companies working 
large gangs of men will find this 
well suited to their requirements. 




IRONSIDES 



Radnor Ranges 
Home Victor Ranges 
Victor Cook DobuleOven 

"Ranges 
Hotel Ranges 
Royal Victor Ranges 
No. 10 Ironsides Cook 
Patrol Wood Stove 
No. go Ironsides 
Haddon Ranges 



A FEW OF THE LEADING 

Home Victor Hot Water Stoves 
Farmer Girl Cook 
New H. A. Elm Double Heaters 
Vulcan Double Heaters 
Tropic Sun Heating Stoves 



STOVES 



Index Heating Stoves 
Solar Kent Heating 

Stoves 
Prompt Ranges 
Cozy Ranges 



Haddon Hercules Heating Stoves Victor Cook Ranges 



Ormond Ranges 

No. 15 Hot Blast Heating Stoves 

Victor Gem Cook 

Laundry Stoves 



Loyal Victor Ranges 
Victor Hotel Ranges 
Elm Ranges 
Farmer Boy Cook Stoves 



FURNISHED 

Our Friend Cook Stoves 
Sentry Wood Stoves 
Home Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Home Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Solar Cellar Furnaces 
Farmer's Furnaces and 

Cauldrons 



Manufactured by 



S. V. REEVES, 45 N. 2nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game B -eerier, or sign your letters : "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



67 




Get a Hand Trap 

and practice field shooting. Slip one in the locker of your boat, or under the seat of 
your motor car. Pack one in your vacation outfit. Enjoy the sport of shooting where 
and when the spirit moves. 



The (g 




Hand Trap 



is a portable gun club — little in size but big in enjoyment. It throws all kinds of 
targets and is bully practice for both beginners and experts. Folds up — goes easily 
into the average suitcase and is ready for use at all times. Costs $4.00 at your dealer's. 
If he can't supply you we'll send it post paid anywhere in the United States upon 
receipt of price. Get one today and add to your summer's pleasure. 

Write for Hand Trap Booklet No. 354. 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company 

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 

Plan your vacation this year to include a trip to Atlantic City, N. J. Visit the "Du Pont 
Store," Pennsylvania Avenue and Boardwalk — see the big Du Pont Night Sign and try your skill 
at the Trapshooting School on the end of Young's Million Dollar Pier. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



68 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Rockaway River— Longwood Valley Club. 



CONTENTS 



Survey of The Field — Are We Coming To This? — A Better Way — Game Laws 
and Quail — The Cost of Quail Preserving — Some Questions for California — 
Lonely Arizona — Quail with an Awful Stomach — Brer Fox in Kentucky — 
The More Game Movement — Harmony. 



The Longwood Valley Club - - - 
The California Valley Elk - - - - 
The Migratory Bird Law Regulators 

Snakes and Snakes 

How to Organize a Game Breeding Association 



Kenneth F. Lockwood 

Barton W. Evermann 

U. S. Biological Survey 

Alien Samuel Williams 

- D. W. Huntington 

By Our Readers 



Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves -■•.-■- 

Market Reports — Quail in the Woods — Acorns a Suggestion to Cat Owners 
Editorials — Snakes — At It Again — Criminal Absurdities and Exceptions — The 
Regulations — The Game Breeders — Geo. D. Pre tt. 



T he Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Enteied as second-class matter. July q. 1915, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act ot March 3, 1879. 



VOLUME IX 



JUNE, I9J6 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 3 



Are We Coming to This? 

A newspaper item in the Saturday 
News of Lewisburgh, Pa., states that the 
quail season opens October 15 and closes 
November 1. The limit is four birds in 
one day, ten in a week, and twenty in 
the season. Evidently both season and 
bag limit are down to a microscopic 
limit. 

California Fish and Game, the quar- 
terly publication of the State Game De- 
partment, quoting the above asks: "Are 
we coming to this? Will twenty years 
more hunting in California bring this 
State to-the same short season and small 
bag limit ?" and says : "The answer is 
yes, unless we profit by the experience 
of such States as Pennsylvania." 

The truth of the matter is that Cali- 
fornia, like many other States soon will 
learn that the season and bag limits 
quoted are much too big. Many States 
have put bobwhite on the song bird list 
and only permit this bird to be eaten by 
cats, foxes, crows and other vermin. Of 
course, a few illegal shooters, also, can 
have quail to eat. It is a simple, well un- 
derstood natural law that if we add to 
the checks to increase of any species, the 
species quickly will decrease in numbers. 
Shooting and cats are important checks 
to increase. The easy way to save the 
quail has been found by some game offi- 
cers to be, to take the sportsman's 
money and use it to execute laws pro- 
hibiting quail shooting. The sportsman 
can pay $1.00 for a license and shoot at 
the trap. 

A Better Way. 

In New York State quail shooting is 
prohibited for a term of years, except- 



ing on Long Island. It has been a diffi- 
cult matter to keep the island open. For- 
tunately there are many clubs and indi- 
vidual quail breeders on the Island. The 
quail are increasing in numbers, rapidly, 
the shooting is good and the bag limit 
has been enlarged recently. 

The places where foxes, hawks, crows, 
cats and other vermin are best controlled 
have the best shooting, but there is ex- 
cellent shooting on many places where 
any one can shoot by reason of the fact 
that many quail nest outside the "noisy 
sanctuaries" which are the best possible 
sanctuaries because the shooting always, 
is lively on the inside and fairly good in 
the neighborhood of such places. It is; 
a very simple proposition based on Dar- 
win's statement, "reduce the checks to 
increase and the species quickly will in- 
crease to any amount." 

Game Laws and Quail. 

Of course, in States where quail 
shooting is prohibited and where no one 
is permitted to breed quail for profit, the 
cats and other vermin have a fair amount 
of game to eat excepting on places 
where the covers are few and where nat- 
ural foods are scarce. In such places the 
vermin and a little illegal shooting^ is 
enough to exterminate the game during 
the periods when shooting is prohibited. 

It is highly important that those who 
arrange with the farmers to shoot on the 
posted farms should be permitted to sell 
some of the quail they produce. It costs 
something to plant covers and food so 
as to keep the birds abundant and evenly 
distributed. It costs something to con- 
trol the foxes, hawks, crows, v snakes, 
cats and many other game enemies so 



70 



THE GAME BREEDER 




that always there will be plenty of game 
to shoot, sell and eat. The selling is im- 
portant because men of moderate means 
should sell. some game to help pay their 
expenses. L ' 

The Cost of Quail Preserving. 

Where quail are bred wild in the fields 
the cost of production is very small com-"" 
pared to the cost of hand-rearing pheas- . 
ants and ducks. The wild bred quail af- " 
ford the best shooting. The advantages 
of a good game breeder's law are that 
those who operate under it make their 
own season and bag limits and sell some 
of the extra game to keep the expenses 
down. There are places near New York 
where the dues in quail clubs are only 
$15 to $25 per year. Since no quail can 
"be sold only enough birds are produced 
for the club members to shcot. We hope 
it will not be long before extra keepers 
can be employed and that enough quail 
will be produced to keep the markets full 
during a long open season. Very little of 
the land now posted will be needed to 
Tceep the markets full. The open season 
for those who do nothing should be long 
and the bag limits should be increased as 
soon as there are one or two quail clubs 
in each county. Trap shooting; clubs pru- 
vide their clay birds. Quail shooting 
clubs must provide their quail. It-is a 
very easy matter to do this but not in 
States where shooting is prohibited. 

Some Questions for California. 

One of our California members has 
sent the. following questions : 

1. Is California a game breeding 
State? , 

2. Is there a licensed game breeder in 
California? 

3. Are any California breeders oper- 
ating under the Bowman act? 

4. Have any permits to breed game 
been issued under this act? 

5. If so, how many? 

6. What part, if any, of the Bowman 
act is executed? 

7. Is the State propagating and pre- 
serving its game? 

& Is there a duck preserve in Califor- 



nia which produces any of the ducks 
shot ? 

9. Will 3,000 game birds stock 156,000 
square miles of territory? 
. .10. Does the State plant fish in private 
waters ? 

11. If the California breeders are not 
operating under the Bowman act under 
which law are they working ? 

Many of our readers are breeding 
game in California. Only a few adver- 
tise in The Game Breeder, but we pre- 
sume that here, as elsewhere, most of 
them could not fill their orders. 

We are, inclined ...to think from the 
many . letters coming from. California 
that it is time Tor the game breeders, 
sportsmen, hotel. men,, farmers and- deal- 
ers to get together and to work together 
for more game and a better game breed- 
ers' law than the Bowman act is. 

We understand that the charge for a 
license is too hi°fh— $25.00. This should 
be reduced to $2 ; as it has been in some 
States, or to nothing as it is in Massa- 
chusetts. The State should be glad to 
issue breeders' permits at a nominal cost 
or without charge, if it wishes to have 
the game increased rapidly. 

We are inclined to believe that most 
of the numerous California duck clubs 
are v destroyers only and not producers 
of game. We believe all of them will 
auickly undertake game breeding when 
they understand the subject and the 
many benefits game breeders have under 
a proper law. 

Of course, 3,000 birds will not stock 
a big State, especially when the birds are 
thinly distributed and for the most part 
quickly eaten up by vermin. Some of 
our members now shoct over 3,000 birds 
in a season and have plenty left over. 
Tame game produced en a State game 
farm is no match for the numerous ene- 
mies which occur everywhere when, it 
is liberated. We heard recently that 
California had decided to give up feed- 
ing vermin and that the State farm 
would be abandoned. The State should 
distribute game birds as the United 
States Fish Bureau distributes fish. To 
those who will look after them properly 
and multiply their numbers. Quickly the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



71 



game will overflow from such places and 
tend to restock the State. -Seeds are 
given by the government to those who 
will plant them. The department should 
represent all of the people and should 
see that game is produced for them to 
eat.. 

We cannot answer all of the questions 
asked but we believe the State game of- 
ficers see the importance- of encouraging 
game breeding: that they will help to 
have the law made right. We shall be 
glad to help plan a 1 campaign in Califor- 
nia such as has resulted in much good 
in other States. The best game officers 
do not interfere with or prevent the pro- 
duction of game. 

We understand -that the "otherwise 
than by shooting nonsense" occurs in the 
California law. This absurdity made its 
first appearance in New York which has 
set numerous fashions of nonsense. It 
was knocked out the first year in so far 
as pheasants are concerned. The next 
year the law was amended so as to per- 
mit the owner to shoot his ducks. It is 
likely that over five thousand birds will be 
shot this year at some of the shoots. The 
pheasants and ducks are now sold at 
godd prices in the New York market's. 
Pheasant and' duck breeding and shoot- 
ing has been put on a safe basis, the 
owners of the game make their own bag 
limits and season limits and sell large 
quantities of game for the people to eat. 
We have just opened the New York 
market to the breeders in other States 
and soon it will be full of pheasants and 
ducks during long open seasons. 

The Game Conservation Society will 
in the future conduct a vigorous cam- 
paign in the interest of <~ur native quail 
and grouse. Tbese need the breeders at- 
tention most. In some States it is legal 
to produce and sell them. We exoect 
in a verv few years to have the markets 
full of them and the sportsman who can- 
not find a place to shoot will surely be 
a blind one when game is abundant and 
cheap. 

Lonely Arizona. 

Arizona has the distinction of being 
one of the' few States, if not the only 
one, in the Union without any commer- 



cial' or even sporting game breeders. 
Arizona, however, has a very small pop- 
ulation and plenty of the wild foods to 
go round, Tt would be a good State for 
a few commercial quail farms. The land 
is cheap, the climate is' suitable and at 
one time the Gambell's quail was' tremen- 
dously abundant. 

G. M. Willard, the State game warden 
writes : "Aside from some experimental 
work in pheasant culture, being carried 
on by this department on a small scale, 
there is ho one in the State engaged in 
the propagation of game birds or animals 
either for -sport or profit." 

Quail With an Awful Stomach. 

One of our readers, a Southern game- 
keeper, says in sending a clipping from 
a Baltimore paper : , "This quail must 
have had an awful stomach:; I guess if 
all the insects was put together they 
would weigh about-a half pound." Mr. 
Hansen, State game warden of Tennes- 
see, is quoted in the clipping as present- 
ing, "many examples of work done by 
the commoner varieties of birds; his 
analysis of a meal found in the stomach 
of a single quail is as interesting as any. 
This one high-liver had stored away 
2,326 plant lice, 568 mosquitoes, 100 po- 
tato bugs, 100 chinch bugs, 39 grasshop- 
pers, 12 squash bugs, 12 cut worms, 12 
army worms and 8 white grubs." We 
often wonder that the game politician 
when discussing natural history should 
stop at scores and hundreds of bugs. 
Why not make it thousands of each kind 
instead of exactly 12 squash bugs, 12 cut 
worms and 12 army worms ? The want 
of a few facts never should be permitted 
to interfere with a good story when a 
political department is exploited for the 
benefit of the farmers who often realiy 
know something about the real habits of 
birds. 

Brer Fox in Kentucky. 

Kentucky has a new law protecting 
fur-bearing animals, including the fox. 
The law wisely provides that farmers 
may kill the fox and others at any time 
on his own premises if they be found in- 
jurious. Game farmers will no doubt 



72 



THE GAME BREEDER 



see that the foxes and other animals de- 
structive to game are properly controlled 
on game farms. There is plenty of room 
in Kentucky for the splendid sport of 
fox hunting without running the hounds 
through farms where game is propagated 
abundantly. 

Kentucky now has a good game breed- 
ers' law and no doubt there will be fox 
breeding counties in Kentucky where 
this sport predominates and game breed- 
ing counties where game is bred abun- 
dantly, just as there are counties in Eng- 
land where one or the other sport is 
more common. English writers say it is 
a difficult matter to rear game in fox 
hunting counties, but they manage to 
have both game and foxes on some 
estates. We have pointed out often that 
the owners of the premises should decide 
what they will entertain and the two new 
Kentucky laws seem to carry out this 
idea. 

The "More Game" Movement. 

The "more game" movement seems ro 
be gaining great headway in the Central 
States. It is flourishing in New Eng 
land. Rapidly it is flowing into Califor- 
nia, where soon it will be an organized 
force. The wave of common sense which 
it represents soon will make it easy for 
State game officers, everywhere from 
Maine to California, to permit the sale 
of any kind of food produced by industry 
on a farm. It really seems to be an odd 
crime — "food producing!" We have of- 
ten thought if some one (especially one 
of the many women, who are now pro- 
ducing quail and other foods) would go 
to jail for a short time for profitably 
producing food on a farm, and let us use 
a photograph of the prisoner behind the 
bars, the result would be to quickly put 
an end to this nonsense for all time to 
come. There is no possible reason why 
the American farmers and sportsmen 
should not have as much freedom as 
farmers and sportsmen have in all other 
countries. 

Bully for the Booklet. 

News comes from every State in the 
Union about the remarkable work being 



done by the Game Breeding Department 
of the Hercules Powder Company. We 
have had excellent reports about the 
booklet, "Game Farming for Profit and 
Pleasure," issued by this company, and 
the effect it has had in opening the eyes 
of the people to the necessity for game 
farming for profit as well as for pleas- 
ure. We distributed several thousand 
copies of this book, and the demand for 
it still continues. A prominent sports- 
man from the West, who called at the 
office of The Game Breeder a few days 
ago, said he had procured over an hun- 
dred copies of the book and was con- 
verting his neighbors to the "more game" 
idea. 

Harmony. 

Now that the National Association of 
Audubon Societies has a department of 
applied ornithology, which works on all 
fours with the Game Conservation So- 
ciety, and with the Game Breeding De- 
partment of the Hercules Powder Com- 
pany, and the American Protective As- 
sociation, also, has a committee on game 
breeding; the harmonious activities of 
these interests should soon make Amer- 
ica the biggest game producing country 
in the world. Game breeding with the 
Game Conservation Society, which natu- 
rally leads the "more game" procession, 
is not a department ; it is the whole show. 

The other societies have a wider range ; 
the Audubons look after the song birds 
and all other birds ; the American Asso- 
ciation takes a special interest in the cre- 
ation of quiet refuges for game. The 
Hercules Powder Co., of course, has dy- 
namite and ammunition powders as a 
side line; but the fact that we are all 
pulling together for "more game and 
fewer game laws" (in so far as breeders 
are concerned) indicates beyond a rea- 
sonable doubt that America soon will be 
the biggest game producing country in 
the world. 

There is honor enough for all. 



Subscribe for The Game Breeder, only 
L a year. 



THE GAME BREEDER. 



73 




The Club House. 



THE LONGWOOD VALLEY SPORTSMEN'S CLUB. 



Kenneth F. Lockwood. 



Tourist and summer resort literati 
long ago made trite the most delectable 
adjectives in our vocabulary — a most un- 
fortunate fact when one sets out to de- 
scribe such an enterprise as is the sub- 
ject of this narrative. There may have 
been a day when the public was willing 
to believe that beautiful meant beauti- 
ful and that wonderful meant just that 
and so on, but the reckless abandon with 
which these words have been seized 
upon and dragged into type has multi- 
plied the population of Missouri beyond 
all reason. 

Now, skepticism is a terrible affliction. 
It ossifies and petrifies the mind and the 
heart. The original bonehead was sim- 
ply a skeptic — not a dunce at all. Oddly 



enough the ossification process does not 
affect the eye. Thus the most efficient 
way to treat a victim is to take him by 
the hand and gently "lead him to it." 
Which is what happened in the case of 
the writer. True, he was not exactly a 
skeptic, nor did he claim Missouri as his 
official residence, but he had read an aw- 
ful number of railroad and resort book- 
lets — about places he had visited. Let 
us say, as they do in Washington these 
days, that his mind was open on the sub- 
ject. 

It is no mean distance from near- 
skepticism or open-mindedness to enthu- 
siastic, partisan conviction, yet in the 
case of the writer it was covered in a 
single step. That was when one fine day 



74 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Good Trout Water. 



not long ago he stepped into the sunlight 
of Longwood valley, county of Morris, 
State of New Jersey. 

Northeast and southwest the valley 
rolls away in gentle undulations of fra- 
grant meadowland, from whose eastern 
and western borders rise steeo, wooded 
mountains standing like scowling, broad- 
shouldered giants guarding their jeweled 
treasures, and there are jewels in this 
valley — jewels set in the golden richness 
of the sweet New Jersey air — the emer- 
ald of the meadows, the platinum band 
of the smiling, sunny river ; the blue dia- 
mond of the crystal lake. They are 
priceless gems on the virgin brow of the 
siren Outdoors,- whose song is the song 
of the birds, of the wind whispering in 
the grass and the tree-tops, of the in- 
sects' chirp and the brook's rippling 
laughter. 

This Upper Longwood Valley — or at 
least a very great part of it — is the 
leased property, lock, stock and barrel, 
of the Longwood Valley Club, which is 
"'ow being organized — it is well started 



on its way, in fact, it is situated in the 
extreme northwestern corner of Morris 
County and consists of some 5,000 acres, 
which for years was the private fish and 
game preserve of the late United States 
Senator John Kean, of New Jersey, who 
kept it posted against trespassing and 
carefully patrolled. 

The valley long has been known to 
Jersey sportsmen for its excellent hunt- 
ing and fishing and the cream of it all 
is the Kean estate. Among those who 
had their eyes on the property was 
Charles T. Champion, a noted Jersey 
sportsman, who was the father of the 
Newark Bait and Fly Casting Club, a 
leading organization of the East. Soon 
after Senator Kean's death Mr. Cham- 
pion entered into negotiations with the 
estate and eventually secured a lease for 
ten years with an eye to the organization 
of an exclusive club to control the 
property. 

On the 5,000 acres one may find the 
outdoor world, in all its aspects — moun- 
tain and lowland, forest and meadow, 



THE GAME BREEDER 



75 



lake and stream. The forests are dense 
and wild, yet in good shape for hunting. 
There are two trout streams and a lake 
a mile and a half long, with wooded 
shores for the most part and innumer- 
able coves and "turns. It is famous for 
ass and pickerel. 
The nearest large town is Dover, 
which may be reached by either the Mor- 
ris and Essex Division or the Boonton 
branch of the Lackawanna Railroad. 
There are more than twenty trains daily 
each way between New York and Dover 
at convenient hours. The trip can be 
made from Hoboken in a little more 
than an hour, and from Dover it is a run 
of seven miles to the club. There are 
numerous garages in town, where autos 
may be hired by the man who dees not 
care to drive all the way by motor. But 
the motorist will find the going good. 
The main route to Dover affords excel- 
lent traveling and the highway to the 
preserve is in first class condition most 
of the year. The trip has been made 
from New York in less than two hours. 



Longwood valley is wider at its south- 
ern than at its northern end, but through 
that part of it which is on the preserve — 
a stretch of over two miles — the width 
varies but little. The mountains rise ab- 
ruptly and to great height and are 
wooded and rocky. To the west the 
property extends about three miles over 
Bowling Green mountain and part way 
up another mountain, beyond which lies 
Lake Hopatcong. To the east it stretches 
to the very ridge of Copperas Mountain, 
a striking counterpart of Bowling Green. 
Here and there on the summit of the lat- 
ter are clearings of several acres where 
early settlers made their homes. These 
spots, which are overgrown with rank 
grass and other growth, make excellent 
cover for game birds and rabbits. Some 
of these clearings will be ploughed and 
sewn with buckwheat and other suitable 
grain and left standing for the exclusive 
use of the wild game. 

Indisputable evidence of deer may be 
found on every hand. During the past 
winter a large herd foregathered in a 




Full of Native Trout. 



76 



THE GAME BREEDER 



hemlock grove some 500 yards from the 
club-house and remained there and 
around the barn yard until the hard 
weather had passed. They are likewise 
frequently seen at other points on the 
property. Partridge, pheasant and rab- 
bit abound and the lake is a favorite 
resort of wild duck and other water fowl. 

There are two trout streams on the 
property — Beaver Brook and the Rock- 
away River. Beaver Brook chatters 
away in a shady valley beyond Bowling 
Green Mountain. It is a rock-bedded 
stream of white-capped riffles and deep, 
dark pools — and the trout that are in it 
are real native trout. 

The Rockaway is another inspiration 
to the angler. Somewhat wider and 
deeper than Beaver, it flows through the 
valley for miles. Dotting its course are 
pools of great depth where, like a 
wounded snake, the river turns and 
twists, cutting deep caverns under its 
grassy banks. It is one of the finest 
streams for fly casting the writer ever 
has seen. 

Beaver Brook will be given over en- 
tirely to brook trout, while in the Rock- 
away the rainbow will live and move 
and have its being until the fatal fly, 
in expert hands, rounds out its career. 

Two trout ponds will complete the fa- 
cilities afforded the angler. Each is only 
a short walk from the club house, one 
being on Bowling Green Mountain, the 
other in the valley. In one there will 
be nothing but brook trout, in the ether 
only rainbows. Both ponds are fed by 



never-failing springs of ice cold water 
and are ideally suited to the purposes 
for which they will be used. But little 
work remains to be done to put them 
in shape. Indeed, by no means the least 
important of the club's activities will be 
the breeding of trout for stocking pur- 
poses. Black bass will also be raised on 
the place. In the way of game, chief 
attention will be devoted to pheasant and 
wild turkey breeding. 

The club-house stands on an eminence 
overlooking the valley. It is a large, 
roomy structure, whose air of homeli- 
ness is enticing and satisfying. The 
rooms are large for the most part. A 
wide porch entirely surrounds the house 
and the view from this in, any direction 
is enthralling. 

Membership will be limited. With 
such a proposition as this, it is, of course, 
extremely desirable to get together a 
class of men who, first of all, will be , 
congenial. Nothing is being left undone 
to accomplish this. 

Mr. Champion, the organizer, has had 
much experience in such fields. ■ He 
served several terms as chairman of 
the preserve committee of the Newark 
Club, and is qualified to know what is 
what. He is one of the leading tourna- 
ment casters of the east, and has par- 
ticipated as a winner in many tourna- 
ments. He was for years secretary of 
the Federal Trust Company of Newark, 
and is at present engaged in a kindred 
line, with offices in the Essex Building, 
Newark. 



THE CALIFORNIA VALLEY ELK. 

By Barton Warren Evermann, 
Director of the Museum, California Academy of Sciences. 

[The article about the California valley elk referred to was published in The Game Breeder 
This splendid food animal would surely have become extinct had it not been preserved by Henry 
Miller on the. ranch of Miller & Lux. The story of the handling and distribution of the elk 
after they became sufficiently abundant to do thousands of dollars worth of damage is especially 
timely in view of the recent stories about the damage done by deer on Shelter Island, N. Y., 
and the decision of the State department to exterminate them which, however, was abandoned 
in favor of the better plan of sending the deer to the State park. — Editor.] 

In California Fish and Game for Ap- fornia valley elk (Cervus nannodes). In 

ril'10, 1915 (Vol. I, No. 3, pp. 85-96), that article evidence was presented con- 

a brief account was given of the former vincingly showing that this fine animal 

distribution and abundance of the Cali- formerly ranged over the entire San Joa- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



77 



quin Valley and adjacent foothills, and 
through Livermore and Sufiol valleys 
across to the Santa Clara Valley and 
even to Monterey where Don Sebastian 
Viscaino found them abundant when he 
landed there December 10, 1602. Evi- 
dence was also presented showing that 
the range of this elk extended well up 
into, if not throughout, the Sacramento 
Valley. 

Throughout most of its range the 
species was very abundant in those early 
days and it continued to be abundant in 
the San Joaquin Valley at least as late 
as the early fifties. With the rapid in- 
crease in population of California fol- 
lowing the discovery of gold, the elk had 
a hard time of it, and their numbers 
rapidly decreased. Through persistent 
and more or less constant harassment 
they were soon driven out of the foot- 
hills and down into the valley where 
they found, when too hard pressed, a 
comparatively safe retreat in the tule 
marshes. But even there they were not 
secure. The eager hunters soon devised 
ways and means by which the animals 
could be followed into the tule lands, 
and their numbers went on decreasing. 
In the early seventies it is said only a 
few individuals were left of the once 
vast herds which only a decade or two 
before had roamed over the great in- 
terior valley. One report has it thai 
there was but a single pair. This may 
not be literally true, but it doubtless cor- 
rectly states the general fact that the 
species was almost extinct. 

Then it was that a man of vision came 
upon the scene and saved this magnifi- 
cent animal from complete extermina- 
tion. That man was Henry Miller, the 
founder of the great cattle company of 
Miller and Lux, the greatest company 
of the kind in America, if not in the 
world. It was Henry Miller who saw 
the fate which inevitably awaited the 
California valley elk unless prompt ac- 
tion were taken to protect the few ani- 
mals that were left. Fortunately, the 
few remaining elk made their last stand 
in the southern part of the San Joaquin 
Valley in the vicinity of what is now 
called Buena Vista Lake, and on land 



owned or controlled by Miller and Lux. 
There they had been able to secure a 
measure of safety in the willows and 
tules, but. it was Mr. Miller's strict 
orders to the employees of the company 
that the elk must not be disturbed under 
any circumstances, that saved them. 

In the article to which reference has 
been made, it is told how the herd in- 
creased in numbers until in 1914 there 
were probably more than 400 animals 
in it, how the herd was doing consider- 
able damage each year to the alfalfa and 
Egyptian corn fields on the Miller and 
Lux Kern County ranch, and how the 
California Academy of Sciences under- 
took to reduce the herd somewhat by 
transferring some of the animals to suit- 
able places in other parts of the State. 
It was believed that herds could be 
established in a number of reservations 
and parks in the State where they would 
thrive and thus establish several new 
centers for the propagation and preserva- 
tion of the species. The thought was 
to increase as much as possible the con- 
ditions favorable to the preservation of 
the species. In pursuance of this policy 
54 elk were distributed in the fall of 
1914 to seven different reservations and 
parks. Many requests for elk could not 
be supplied at that time, the number of 
animals Messrs. Miller and Lux were 
able to capture not being enough to go 
around. Those who could not be sup- 
plied in 1914 were quite anxious to se- 
cure some of the elk and it was decided 
to make another distribution in the fall 
of 1915. This was done. Messrs. Miller 
and Lux again built a large corral near 
Buttonwillow in a field to which the elk 
were in the habit of coming at night 
to feed. The same method was followed 
as was pursued .the previous year. A 
total of 100 animals were captured and 
92 of these were distributed to four- 
teen different places. 

In order that the record may be com- 
plete, there is given herewith a list of 
all the shipments for the two years, to- 
gether with the available data regarding 
the present condition of the various 
herds. The distribution in 1915, as in 
1914, was under the immediate direction. 



.78 



THE GAME BREEDER 



of Mr. A. L. Bolton, of the California 
Academy of Sciences. 



'Here follows a detailed description of 
the distributions of the elk to fourteen 
parks and private preserves. 
*'*** * * * * * * 

From the above detailed description it 
appears that the Academy has distrib- 
uted 146 elk among nineteen different 
reservations and parks in the State ; that 
of this number 25 have died as a result 
of injuries received while being caught 
or beacuse of unfavorable climatic con- 
ditions, or from unknown causes ; that 
at least 3 fawns were born in 1915, and 
that the animals now in the various 
reservations and parks total at least 124. 
The California valley elk is an ex- 
tremely wild and nervous animal under 
natural conditions and peculiarly liable 
to receive injury in handling. It is re- 
gretted that several were lost, but the 
number is no greater than should be ex- 
pected in handling animals of such deli- 
cate organization. When these elk be- 
come adjusted to their new environment 
it is hoped and believed their rapid in- 
crease will soon more than make good 
all losses that may have occurred. 

It ■ is estimated that the number left 
in the Kern County herd is between 350 
and 400. These, together with those in 
the new potential centers of increase, as- 
sure with reasonable certainty the pre- 
servation of the species. In some of 
these centers it is believed they will be- 
come common within a few years. In 
the meantime the Kern County herd will 
go on increasing and will continue to do 
large annual damage to the alfalfa and 
Egyptian corn fields of that region. 



MIGRATORY BIRD LAW 
AT IT AGAIN. 

Game Law Making with a Vengeance. 

United States Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, D. C, May 16, 1916. 
Editor, Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau Street, 
New York City. 
Dear Sir: 

I am sending you herewith a copy of the 
proposed new regulations under the Federal 



Migratory Bird Law. These regulations are to 
be published for thtee months subject to com- 
ment, suggestions, and hearings wnere thought 
deciraoie. 

At L ne expiration of three mo.itns the regu- 
lations with any changes that may have Deen 
made resulting from suggestions received will 
be recommended for the President's signature 
and then become effective. This will occur in 
time for the earliest date of the open season, 
which is August 16 for shore birds. 

You will note that a number of changes are 
made in the regulations now in force and the 
biological Survey believes that many criticisms 
concerning the regulations have been met with- 
out in any way interfe'ring with the proper 
safeguarding of migratory birds. I trust that 
you will give .the proposed new regulations 
full publicity in your paper since you reach 
many people who are much interested in this 
subject. 

Very truly yours, 

H. W. HENSHAW, 
Chief, Biological Survey. 

Proposed Regulations for the Protec- 
tion of Migratory Birds. 

United 'States Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, D. C, May 16, 1916. 
Bureau of Biological Survey. 

PROPOSED REGULATIONS FOR THE PROTECTION OF 
MIGRATORY BIRDS. 

Washington, D. C, May 13, '1916. 

Pursuant to the provisions of the act of 
March 4, 1913, authorizing and directing the 
Department of Agriculture to adopt suitable 
regulations prescribing and fixing closed sea- 
sons for migratory birds (37 Stat., 847), regu- 
lations, copy of which is hereto annexed, have 
been prepared, are hereby made public, and are 
hereby proposed for adoption, after allowing a 
period of three months in which the same may 
be examined and considered. The regulations, 
as finally adopted, will become effective on or 
after August 16, 1916, whenever approved by 
the President. 

Public hearings on the proposed regulations 
will be held by the Bureau of Biological Sur- 
vey of this department whenever deemed 
necessary. Inquiries in reference thereto 
should be addressed to the Secretary of Agri- 
culture. 

D. F. HOUSTON, 
Secretary of Agriculture.. 



Regulations for the Protection of 

Migratory Birds. 

Pursuant to the provision of the act of 
March 4, 1913, authorizing and directing the 
Department of Agriculture to adopt suitable 
regulations prescribing and fixing closed sea- 
sons for migratory birds (37 Stat., 847), hav- 
ing due regard to zones of temperature breed- 
ing habits, and times and lines of migratory 
flight, the Department of Agriculture has pre- 



GAME BREEDER 



79 



pared and hereby makes public, for examina- 
tion and consideration before final adoptipn, 
the following regulations : 

Regulation 1. — Definitions. 

For the purposes of these regulations the 
following shall be considered migratory game 
birds : 

(a) Anatidae or waterfowl, incluing, brant, 
wild ducks, geese, and swans. 

(b) Gruidae or cranes, including little 
brown, sandhill, and whooping cranes. 

(c) Rallidae or rails, including coots, galli- 
nules, and sora and other rails. 

(d) Limicolae or shore birds, including avo- 
cets, curlew, dowitchers, godwits, knots, oys- 
ter catchers, phalaropes, plover, sandpipers, • 
snipe, stilts, surf birds, turnstones, willet, 
woodcock, and yellowlegs. 

(e) Columbidae or pigeons, including doves 
and wild pigeons. 

For the purposes of these regulations the 
following shall be , considered migratory in- 
sectivorous birds : 

(f) Bobolinks, catbirds, chickadees, cuckoos, 
flickers, flycatchers, grosbeaks, humming birds, 
kinglets, martins, meadowlarks, nighthawks or 
bull bats, nuthatches, orioles, robins, shrikes, 
swallows, swifts, tanagers, titmice, thrushes, 
vireos, warblers, waxwings, whippoorwills, 
woodpeckers, and wrens, and all other perch- 
ing birds which feed entirely or chiefly on 
insects. 

Regulation 2. — Closed Season at Njght. 

A daily closed season on all migratory game 
and insectivorous birds shall extend from sun- 
set to sunrise. 

Regulation 3. — Closed Season on Insectivor- 
ous Birds. 

A closed season on migratory insectivorous 
birds shall continue throughout each year, ex- 
cept that the closed season on reedbirds or ' 
ricebirds in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Dela- 
ware, Maryland, the District of Columbia, Vir- 
ginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina 
shall commence November 1 and end August 
31, next following, both dates inclusive : Pro- 
zided, That nothing in this or any other of 
these regulations shall be construed to prevent 
the issue of permits for collecting birds for 
scientific purposes in accordance with the laws 
and regulations in force in the respective 
States and Territories and' the District of 
Columbia. 

Regulation 4. — Closed Seasons on Certain 
Game Birds. 

A closed season shall continue until Sep- 
tember 1, 1918, on the following migratory 
game birds : Band-tailed pigeons, little brown, 
sandhill, and whooping cranes, wood ducks, 
swans, curlew, willet, and all shore birds ex- 
cept the black-breasted and golden plover, 
Wilson or jacksnipe, woodcock, and the great- 
er or lesser yellowlegs. 

A closed season shall also continue until 



September 1, ,19,18,. on .rails in California and,. 
Vermont and ,. on woodcock in Illinois and 
Missouri. . ,. . _ ,.._., . „ , 

Regulation 5— Zones.- /■• t ' 

The following zones for the protection of 
migratory game and insectivorous birds are 
liiiieoy established. 

Zone No.. 1. — The. breeding zone comprising 
the states of Maine, New Hampshire, Ver- 
mont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecti- 
cut, New ■ YorK, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, 
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, West Vir- 
ginia, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, 
North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kan- 
sas, ' Missouri, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, 
Idaho, Utah, Nc\ ada, . Oregon and Washing- 
ton— 31 States. 

Zone No. 2. — The wintering zone comprising 
the States of Delaware, Maryland, District of 
Columbia, Virginia, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Missis- 
sippi, Tennessee, Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas, 
Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arizona, and Cali- 
fornia-— 17 States, and the District of Co- 
lumbia. 

Regulation 6. — Construction. 

For the purposes of regulations 7 and 8 
each period of time therein prescribed as a 
closed season shall be construed to include the 
first and last day thereof. 

Regulation 7.— Closed Seasons in Zone No. 1 

Waterfowl. — The closed season on water- 
fowl, including coots and gallinules, shall be 
between December 21 and September 6 next 
following, except as follows : 

Exceptions : In Maine, New Hampshire, 
Vermont, New York (except Long, Island), 
Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Kentucky, .and West 
Virginia the closed season shall be between 
January 1 and September 16-; 

In Massuchusetts, Rhode Island, Connecti- 
cut, Long Island, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, 
Washington, Oregon, Utah, and Nevada the 
closed season shall be between January 16 and 
September 30; and 

In Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, and 
Missouri the closed season shall be between 
March 11 and September 15 and between No- 
vember 16 and February 9.. 

Rails. — The closed season on sora and other 
rails, excluding coots and gallinules, shall be 
between December 1 and August 31 next fol- 
lowing, except as follows : 

Exception : In Vermont the closed season 
shall continue until the open season in 1918. 

Shore birds. — The closed season on black- 
breasted and golden plover and greater and 
lesser yellowlegs shall be between December 1 
and August 15 next following, except as fol- 
lows: 

Exception: In Utah the closed season shall 
continue until the open season in 1918. 

Jacksnipe.— The closed season on jacksnipe 



80 



THE GAME BREEDER 



or Wilson snipe shall be between December 
16 and September 15 next following. 

Woodcock. — The closed season on woodcock 
shall be between December 1 and September 
30 next following, except as follows : 

Exceptions : In Illinois and Missouri the 
closed season shall continue until the open 
season in 1918. 

Regulation 8. — Closed Seasons in Zone No. 2 

Waterfowl. — The closed season on water- 
fowl, including coots and gallinules, shall be 
between February 1 and October 14 next fol- 
lowing, except as follows : 

Exceptions : In Alabama, Arkansas, District 
of Columbia, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, 
Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Caro- 
lina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia 
the closed season shall be between February 1 
and October 31 next following. 

Rails. — The closed season on sora and other 
rails, excluding coots and gallinules, shall be 
between December 1 and August 31 next fol- 
lowing, except as follows : 

Exceptions : In Louisiana the closed season 
shall be between February 1 and October 31; 
and 



In California the closed season shall con- 
tinue until the open season in 1918. 

Shorebirds. — The closed season on black- 
breasted and golden plover and greater and 
lesser yellowlegs shall be between December 1 
and August 15, next following. 

Jacksnipe. — The closed season on jacksnipe 
or Wilson snipe shall be between February 1 
and October 31 next following. 

Woodcock. — The closed season on woodcock 
shall be between January 1 and October 31 
next following. 

Regulation 9. — Hearings. 

Persons recommending changes in the regu- 
lations or desiring to submit evidence in per- 
son or by attorneys as to the necessity for such 
changes should make application to the Sec- 
retary of Agriculture. Hearings will be ar- 
ranged and due notice thereof given by publi- 
cation or otherwise as may be deemed appro- 
priate. Persons recommending changes should 
be prepared to show the necessity for such 
action and to submit evidence other than that 
based on reasons of personal conven : ence or a 
desire to kill game during a longer open 
season. 



SNAKES AND SNAKES. 

By Allen Samuel Williams, 
Director Reptile Study Society. 



[There are undoubtedly snakes and snakes, just as there are hawks and hawks, owls and 
owls, etc., some more beneficial than others. Often we have heard it said that the little 
garter snake and others are harmless even, in the presence of game and that some snakes 
are highly beneficial. The tendency on English game farms and preserves rapidly has been 
in the direction of limiting the destruction of many species of vermin, which formerly were 
deemed to be harmful. We have pointed out that it is desirable that we should start right 
in America and not recklessly destroy harmless species because we imagine they may do. 
some harm. Mr. Williams' article about snakes is timely. We shall be glad to have our readers 
discuss the various snakes and what they are observed to do on game farms. The rule we 
have laid down for the control of vermin is to observe what it does and to act accordingly. — 
Editor.] 



On behalf of the Reptile Study So- 
ciety, the suggestion is offered to readers 
of The Game Breeder and members 
of the Game Conservation Society to ad- 
vocate an interest in sparing the lives 
of harmless (non-poisonous) species of 
reptiles, which cannot harm game birds 
and animals, because they are useful to 
agriculture and to the interests of game 
propagationists through destroying ro- 
dents. In the northeastern United States 
there commonly occurs no more than a 



score of serpents, of which only two, the 
banded rattlesnake and the copperhead 
snake, its, cousin, are venomous. With- 
out naming all the species or concern- 
ing ourselves with their life histories and 
their bearing upon the game breeding 
subject, let us specialize on one species, 
Lampropeltis doliatus triangulus, com- 
monly termed- Milk Snake, House Snake 
or Spotted Adder. This small species 
which does not exceed a yard in length 
feeds, as innumerable analyses of the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



81 



contents of stomachs of specimens has 
proved, almost entirely on small mam- 
mals, principally rats and mice, wild and 
tame. Though too small to engulf a 
grown house rat, a "Milk Snake" can 
absorb an entire brood of infant rats at 
one meal. It is improbable that these 
serpents ever swallow the eggs of pheas- 
ants, quail or other game birds. That 
these serpents milk cows or rob the 
spring house milk crocks of the farmers 
is an absurd but long cherished myth. 
A reason and an object for this com- 
munication is that the indiscriminate 
slaughter of harmless serpents by pain- 
ful processes promotes cruelty to ani- 
mals in general, instead of kindness and 
consideration. Every one of your 
readers and members is more or less a 
naturalist; let them tell us what facts 
they may know or learn about the re- 



lations of serpents to the breeding of 
game. 

The benefit from the food habits of 
the "Milk Snake" and several other ser- 
pents to game breeders is undoubtedly 
considerable, for the rodent, most prolific 
of mammals, takes a heavy toll of game 
bird food, grain, particularly, and rats 
are both egg-eaters and slayers of young 
chickens and young game birds. This 
is meant to be a hint or suggestion to 
stimulate thought, observation and in- 
vestigation by and among your readers 
and members which should eventually 
result in greatly needed contributions to 
science and practical benefits to game 
breeders, hunters and eaters. It is sent 
with a deep appreciation of the efficient 
work of the Game Conservation Society 
and of The Game Breeder as an ad- 
vocate and enlightener. 



HOW TO ORGANIZE A GAME BREEDING ASSOCIATION. 



By D. W. Huntington. 



We have a great variety of game 
breeding associations, game clubs and 
shooting syndicates formed to look after 
the game properly and to provide good 
shooting during long open seasons. We 
have also thousands of game breeders 
who can supply stock birds and eggs in 
large numbers and the number of indi- 
vidual commercial breeders is increasing 
rapidly. 

Several hundred game clubs are more 
or less intimately associated with the 
Game Conservation Society. All take 
and read The Game Breeder and they 
are willing at all times to furnish infor- 
mation about their organization and 
their game breeding methods. We 
often procure invitations for those about 
to start to visit clubs which are suc- 
cessful and see how the work is carried 



on. 



We have published numerous illus- 
trated stories about these clubs and we 
shall publish a hundred or more similar 
articles about the clubs and game farms 



which always have an abundance of 
game and game fish. 

Often we are asked to help start new 
game breeding associations and to give 
advice about the organization and about 
the game breeding methods. Some of 
the successful clubs rely almost entirely 
upon hand-reared game, chiefly pheas- 
ants and ducks ; some have an abundance 
of quail grouse and rabbits bred wild 
in the fields and woods. Some of the 
duck clubs own or rent marshes where 
many wild ducks come in the autumn; 
others have small ponds and lakes 
where both wild and hand-reared ducks 
are shot every season. A few of the 
clubs have wild turkeys, and at one of 
them, The Woodmont, a large number 
of wild turkeys is shot every season. 

Before proceeding to discuss the best 
methods for forming game breeding as- 
sociations, I wish to call the attention of 
those seeking information on this sub- 
ject to the fact that in States which have 
enacted our game breeders' laws it pays 



82 



THE GAME BREEDER 



to have an abundance of game. The 
clubs make their own season limits and 
begin shooting early in the autumn when 
the glorious Indian summer weather 
makes it a pleasure to be out of doors. 
They shoot through the. Christmas holi- 
days and until the breeding season . ap- 
proaches when, of course, the shooting 
ends under a club rule fixing the date. 
The clubs operating under game breed- 
ers' enactments also make their own bag 
limits and at many places with which I 
am familiar the club members shoot 
game which is fully equal .in value to 
the amount of the club dues, which, in 
some clubs,, are small. The clubs can, 
if they wish to do so, sell some of their 
game to help pay their expenses and 
many clubs now do so. This is a highly 
. important matter since it not only enables 
men of comparatively small means to 
join game breeding associations, but it 
also supplies the people with some game 
to eat and makes them friendly to sport. 
When a man can , stop a butcher's bill 
equal in amount to the game he takes 
home he is not out of pocket on account 
of his shooting at the end of the year 
and I deem it of the utmost impor- 
tance that clubs should have the right 
to sell some of the game they produce 
in order to reduce the expense of pro- 
ducing it and properly looking after it. 

Some of the clubs have large dues, 
elaborate club-houses, large grounds and 
many game keepers. Some have very 
modest quarters and much smaller dues. 
Some arrange with a farmer to entertain 
members ; others arrange with a coun- 
try hotel for their entertainment at a 
fixed price. Some clubs own all of their 
shooting ground ; some own a farm and 
rent some shooting on the adjacent land. 
Many do not own any land, but simply 
rent the shooting. 

The shooting rent varies from five to 
ten cents per acre ; sometimes it is the 
amount of the taxes, which in some 
places are very small. 

We have clubs with annual dues as 
low as $15 and $25. At many clubs 
the dues are $50 or $100 and some of 
the clubs have much larger dues, and 
they really are elaborate country clubs 



with all the comforts of a first, class 
city.; hotel. , 

Now that most of the farms are posted 
and there is a movement to close other 
large areas as sanctuaries for game 
where only, foxes, hawks and other ver- 
min are permitted to take it, it is,, highly 
desirable that many sportsmen should 
arrange with the farmers to open, up the 
posted farms so that game can be bred 
abundantly and shot during long open 
seasons without fear of extinction. 

The necessary tendency is to prohibit 
quail and grouse shooting everywhere, 
but this will not be necessary when there 
are a few "noisy sanctuaries" in every 
county. Quail shooting is prohibited in 
many states. In New York it is pro- 
hibited, except on Long Island, where 
there are many clubs which have suc- 
ceeded in keeping the prohibitory game 
law off the island and in keeping the 
quail plentiful not only on the club 
grounds (which occupy only a small 
portion of the island), but also on. free 
...territory where hundreds of gunners 
shoot every season. This certainly is a 
better plan than prohibiting shooting. 

The game clubs usually are incorpo- 
rated. Under game breeders' laws the 
articles of incorporation, usually state 
that the club is formed to breed game 
and game fish, to own or rent lands for 
shooting purposes, to provide outdoor 
recreation for members, etc. 

The state. laws relating to social clubs 
differ somewhat and the. articles of in- 
corporation should, of course, be written 
by a local attorney. He is usually a 
member, of the club. 

The clubs are governed, like other 
corporations, by a board of directors, 
elected by the members. The duties of 
the president and other officers are simi- 
lar to those of the officers in social clubs. 
The president presides at board meet- 
ings, appoints committees, .etc. The 
treasurer collects the dues and pays the 
bills ordered paid by the board; the sec- 
retary keeps the accounts and attends 
to the correspondence. 

Some clubs have elaborate constitu- 
tions, providing for mahy matters which 
might well be left to regulations to be 



THE GAME BREEDER 83 

made from time to time by the board, pensive plans is for a club to arrange 

A simple constitution providing . for the with a country hotel for' the accommo- 

officers and their election, the rules for dation of its members at a fixed rate, 

memberships, etc., is all that is required. This will result in the members get- 

The board should make such regulations t i ng g00 d accommodation at a rate 

as appear to be necessary, especially som ewhat smaller than they would pay 

those providing for the open seaso^ bag if they went tQ a simiIar lace without 

•limit and the sale of game, etc. Often a dub contract The sho0ting should 

these matters are left to a small com- be near ^ hand The ^ tQ ^ 

mittee on game and fish or two com- rented 

mittees, one for game and one for fish, ,. • c ' F . , ■ / oe 

when fish breeding is carried on. The numb K er of guns Some dubs have 25 

board should provide rules for the con- ™ emb f^ so ™ e 50 - The la rger clu bs 

duct of members and fix the club-house have 100 > and in a few cases 20 ° mem " 

rates when the club has a house. Ders. 

One of the simplest and most inex- \t be continued 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 

The Egg Market. number of eggs sold and the price ob- 

Reports from our members indicate tained— not for publication if this is 

that the market for pheasant and duck not desired, but in order that we may 

eggs opened strong. Twenty-five and P 1 "^ a [ air estimate of the eggs sold 

twenty dollars per hundred easily was l " order that those who seem to think 

obtained for eggs, and those who placed there is • no game in the country can 

their advertisements early in The Game be enlightened. 

Breeder reported that quickly they were There was an unprecedented demanq 

sold out. One of the largest New Eng- f or pheasants which increased rapidly as 

land breeders wrote that he was over- th e breeding season approached. The 

sold. He said also that he had sold all P nce r ose rapidly and at the end of the 

the ducks he wished to sell and was not season those who had any birds to sell 

offering any for less than $5.00 per pair. could m ake their own price. Some large 

He says he has decided to keep all dealers appealed to the Game Conserva- 

of his black duck eggs and hatch them. tlon Society- to help them get birds, and 

He sold red-head eggs for $3.00 per egg we were fortunate in finding a good 

last season, but they did not turn out number for one or two dealers who 

well and he says "to satisfy myself I asked for °ur assistance, 
was obliged to refund the money." The opening of the New York mar- 

The market remained strong for duck k et to the breeders in other States will 

eggs until quite recently, when we had re sult in many new game clubs and 

reports from a few breeders that their preserves being started. We have been 

ducks were laying well and they still a sked to give advice about many ot 

had some eggs to dispose of. One says these places, and it is evident that next 

he is much pleased to learn that the season, if the war is not ended in the 

New York market has been opened to meantime, there will be even a bigger 

ducks and that he will hatch the eggs demand than there was at the last breed- 

and send the ducks to this market if he in g season. We would advise those who 

should have any eggs unsold. contemplate starting game breeding for 

. sport or for profit to get in touch at once 

t, ... , with our advertisers and to make early 

Keports wanted. contracts for the delivery of live birds 

We shall be obliged to readers of The in the autumn. The prices surely wi 1 ' 

<Game Breeder if they will report the rise rapidly as the breeding season ap- 



84 



THE GAME BREEDER 



proaches and the birds will thrive better 
and lay more eggs if they are secured 
early and become accustomed to their 
new surroundings. 



Turkeys and Turkey Eggs. 

One of the largest breeders of wild 
turkeys recently reported that he had sold 
all the birds he wished to sell. One 
breeder declined to sell any wild turkey 
eggs for less than $25.00 per dozen and 
said he preferred to keep his eggs and 
hatch them. 

Miss Mary Wilkey, who advertised for 
the first time this season, reported that 
quickly she sold all the wild turkeys and 
eggs she wished to dispose of. 



good that it seems likely more people 
will get into grouse breeding. A good 
big grouse ranch in one of the prairie 
states soon will make a fortune for its 
owner and the breeding operations need 
not interfere with the farming opera- 
tions. The grouse can be made a valu- 
able by-product on many big wheat farms 
where we predict they soon will yield 
more than the wheat. We hope to open 
the New York markets to this desirable 
food soon and quickly it should become 
plentiful. It is mighty good to eat. 



The Deer Market. 

Many deer breeders declined to adver- 
tise since they could not fill their orders. 
One wrote that a small advertisement 
sold all of his deer within a few days 
after it appeared. A space advertise- 
ment asking for deer did not bring any 
response and it was evident that the de- 
mand far exceeded the supply. 



Quail. 



Quail prices literally soared. We had 
a few birds offered at $24.00 per dozen 
but soon sales were reported at thirty- 
six dollars per dozen and later we heard 
of an offer of $5 per bird. It is quite 
evident that the laws should be amended 
promptly in every State so as to permit 
the taking of live birds for propagation. 
The absurdity of issuing licenses to de- 
stroy a certain number of birds per diem 
and of refusing permission to those who 
would prefer to take their birds alive in 
order to breed them is apparent and this 
nonsense like many other varieties must 
be eliminated from the statutes. 



Grouse and Eggs. 

Very few sales of prairie grouse and, 
ruffed grouse have been reported. There 
is a big demand for these birds and their 
eggs. It is now legal to produce them 
in many States and the prices are so 



Quail in the Woods. 

Reports from several of the large quail 
preserves where quail always are abun- 
dant say that the birds frequented the 
woods more than usual. We were un- 
able to give a reason for this without 
seeing the ground. An absence of food 
in the fields, too much persecution in the 
fields by gunners or vermin will produce 
such a result. On some of the big places 
with which we are familiar we can not 
believe that either over shooting or ver- 
min could be assigned as a reason for the 
quails leaving the fields. We would sug- 
gest that the food supply should always 
be looked into and the natural field 
covers should be observed. In some 
places where the covers are too much re- 
duced and food is scarce the quail natur- 
ally take to the woods. 

In a story about one of the smaller 
places published in this issue, it would 
seem that the quail went to the woods 
for the small acorns which were so abun- 
dant that the food could be easily ob- 
tained. Probably is was found easier 
to get a good meal quickly in the woods 
than it was to glean the fields. A little 
corn and wheat distributed in fields when 
the abundant birds may have eaten most 
of the natural food should keep the 
shooting good in the open, where it is 
easier to make the attractive double shots 
than it is in the woods. The more food 
and the more attractive and safe covers 
there are in open fields the easier it is to 
hold the birds evenly distributed in them. 
Vermin should of course be controlled, as 
it now is fairly well on some of the quail 
shoots. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



85 



Wood -Duck. 

Editor of The Game Breeder : 

Sir — Have you ever known the wood- 
duck to build a nest upon the ground? 
Yesterday I found a nest of eight eggs 
on the verge of a high bank under a mass 
of tangled grape vine on my country 
place in Stamford. There are trees with 
large holes in the vicinity, but these are 
occupied by owls, raccoons, opossums 
and squirrels. The wood-duck's nest is 
only a few yards away from a ledge in 
which a litter of grey foxes is raised 
every year. Who wants to bet on the 
luck of the mother wood-duck? 



Robert T. Morris. 



New York. 



ACORNS. 

By J. D. Foot. 

From time to time I have looked over 
your magazine to note if any party either 
had for sale, or desired to buy, acorns as 
a food for game birds. My experience 
shows me in numerous cases, the fond- 
ness for acorns that wild birds have. 

Shooting on lakes and ponds near the 
Mississippi River bottoms, with a ten or 
fifteen foot rise in the river all of the 
ducks left the ponds early in the morn- 
ing for the flooded oak bottoms of the 
river to feed on acorns, returning by 
thousands at sunset to roost in the lakes 
and until the water subsided there were 
few ducks shot on the lakes and ponds. 

Ten years ago — as a Blooming Grove 
member — I have flushed and shot cock 
pheasants, finding three or four whole 
acorns in the throat of the birds. 

A year ago this winter, shooting on 
my club preserve in North Carolina, I 
noticed on the flushing of the covey, 
that one fell back from the rest; think- 
ing it an injured or sick bird, I shot it. 
Our game warden was with me. It was 
a hen bird and its crop was of very large 
size. At my request he opened it and 
we took from that crop seventeen whole 
""wart acorns," called so from their small 
size, about a %. of an inch in diameter. 
It was this bunch in her crop that made 
it hard for her to fly. 

This last winter my clubmates re- 



ported quail scarce. Early in the season 
they were plentiful in the field, but later 
on they could not find them. I went to 
the Jack Oak scrub in February; found 
plenty of quail, which, were scattered 
and picked up later, as singles. In Jack 
Oak with leaves still on, I thought I was 
shooting partridge (grouse) up in our 
northern brush and it took a quick eye 
and good shot to stop them. I examined 
the crops of several. They had nicely 
shelled, quartered and stowed away the 
larger acorns and now and then taken a 
smaller one whole. 

This was an acorn year in North Car- 
olina and under some oaks not twelve 
feet in height I could scrape up acorns 
by the handfull. No wonder the birds 
were plump and large, as large as the 
best Conn, quail weighing seven to eight 
ounces, now and then one of nine ounces, 
a last season bird. 

It occurs to me that breeders of game 
birds should develop the acorn diet in 
the birds they grow. Especially pheas- 
ants, for on shooting preserves where 
these birds are liberated, fully one-third 
escape the gun and were they familiar 
with acorns as a food, both acorns and 
chestnuts might keep them from starving 
until other food was obtainable. If any 
of your readers wish to try this food, I 
can give them the address of a man who 
would gladly sell acorns at $1.00 per 
bushel f. o. b. cars, North Carolina, if 
next year has an "acorn crop." 

A machine could be used to quarter 
the large acorns, and the small fed to the 
birds whole. 



A Suggestion to Cat Owners. 

Mr. J. O. Curtis, Mamaroneck, N. Y., 
writing to the Times, said : "On Satur- 
day last our cat caught two robins. Hav- 
ing tasted blood she has developed the 
hunting instinct, and during the last 
week she caught and killed seven birds. 
Her funeral will take place Sunday aft- 
ernoon."— The Domestic Cat, by E. H. 
Fofbush. 



More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 



86 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T& Game Breeder 

Pubushkd Monthly 
Edited by DVVIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 

NEW YORK, JUNE, 1916. 

TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary- 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



SNAKES. 

We invite readers of The Game 
Breeder, especially game-keepers, to con- 
tribute short stories about their observa- 
tions of the snakes. We know from 
personal experience what the black 
snake and rattlesnake do to game birds 
and eggs ; it is enough to call for their 
extermination on preserves. Although the 
laws may possibly protect certain snakes 
because they are beneficial, we are in- 
clined to believe game keepers will fol- 
low the precedent in the Massachusetts 
deer case (vintage of 1730), reported m 
the May Game Breeder, which indicates 
that laws protecting deer or vermin do 
not apply to land owners or tenants 
when any damage is being done. This 
is good common sense. Most game keep- 
ers are unaware of laws protecting bene- 
ficial hawks, and it is gratifying to ob- 
serve that the courts held, at such an 
early date, that the protective laws do 
not apply, even to food animals, when 
damage is done. Some legislatures have 
confirmed this common law principle by 
enacting declaratory statutes on the sub- 
ject. The rule laid down by, The Game 
Breeder in relation to the control of ver- 
min, "carefully observe what it does and 
act accordingly," has become a common 
rule of conduct on preserves. Even the 
most highly recommended "beneficials," 
like the marsh hawk and others,- are 
promptly hung up on the vermin rack 



when they are observed to prey on. game. 
We should like to know more about 
snakes. 



AT IT AGAIN. 

The regulations adopted under the 
Federal migratory bird law having cre- 
ated a considerable disturbance through- 
out the country, the Biological Survey 
has decided to try again and see if it can- 
not please the prospective criminals. Mr. 
H. W. Henshaw, chief of the Bureau of. 
Biological Survey, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, in a letter to The Game 
Breeder, inclosing a copy of the pro- 
posed regulations, says: "I trust you 
will give the proposed new regulations, 
full publicity." 

We will. They are published in full 
on another page. Before discussing the 
absurdities of this amateurish attempt 
at criminal law making, we wish to re- 
mark that there should be no objection 
to a simple, national law making it a 
crime to kill migratory song and insecti- 
vorous birds at all times (when not in- 
jurious to crops) and to shoot migratory 
game birds during the breeding season, 
provided, of course, such a law be con- 
stitutional. 

Such a law should be short, simple, 
easily understood, uniform and universal. 
It should be placed in the statute books 
with other criminal enactments where 
the people who are presumed to know the 
law can find it. 

Crime is a serious matter. The mak- 
ing of criminal laws should not be dele- 
gated to the doctors of medicine and 
ornithology, who evidently have no 
knowledge of the common legal princi- 
ples which should, underlie all criminal 
enactments. A great wrong is perpe- 
trated when numerous legal snares are 
set and concealed which will result in 
innocent people being trapped by game 
officers and fined or imprisoned because 
they do not know the law. We say "con- 
cealed" advisedly, since the regulations, 
creating the crimes are published in a 
bulletin, which usually soon is out of- 
print, and not in the statute book where 
one would expect to find. a; criminal law. 

Judge Beaman, in his brief, filed in 



THE GAME BREEDER 



87 



the United States Supreme Court, when 
the migratory bird law was considered, 
emphasized the fact that a criminal en- 
actment should not be published in a 
bulletin or circular. We insist that a 
criminal law when found should be sim- 
ple and easily understood and that it 
should be uniform throughout the coun- 
try. It should not consist of a volumin- 
ous lot of fanciful restrictions, relating 
to various species of birds, which are 
different at various times and places, 
even if such rules of conduct are made 
to please the prospective criminals in dif- 
ferent localities after "hearings" or con- 
ferences with the promise that the law 
will be changed, from time to time, to 
please newcomers and kickers. Criminal 
laws should not be changed often; they 
should be permanent. 

Our first impression after reading the 
proposed regulations is that the Biologi- 
cal Survey has gone plumb daffy on the 
subject of game laws; that it is unmind- 
ful of the fact that many similar rules 
of conduct prescribed by the States have 
not produced any game for the people 
to eat, although millions of dollars are 
expended annually in the effort to exe- 
cute the state enactments. 

Let the law be made short, simple, 
uniform and universal, easy to under- 
stand when found; let it prohibit the 
taking of song and insectivorous mi- 
grants at all times and the shooting of 
the migratory food birds during the 
nesting season; let it occupy a few lines 
in the statute book with other criminal 
enactments and wi will say, Amen. We 
are opposed to making the United States 
Government appear ridiculous. We are 
opposed to the setting of numerous 
legal snares for the unwary who should 
at least have a fair chance of knowing 
what is criminal and especially where it 
is criminal. 



CRIMINAL ABSURDITIES AND 
EXCEPTIONS. 

Our readers will observe in the pro- 
posed migratory bird law regulations that 
in some localities certain wild food birds 
may be taken and eaten and that in 
other- localities the taking and eating is 



made illegal. -Some plover and tattlers,,, 
for example, may be taken between Au- 
gust 15 and December 1.. "Exception.; 
In Utah the closed season shall continue 
until the open season in 1918." What 
date in 1918 is this? 

Having pondered well, we fail to un- 
derstand why it should be a United 
States crime to take a black breasted 
plover or a greater or lesser yellow 
legged tattler on one side of the Utah 
boundary line and not on the other side 
of the line. The shooter near the line 
surely must look out if the government 
fully polices the boundary and the offi- 
cers know where the line runs. Pos- 
sibly the survey has learned that still 
there are some Mormons in Utah and 
had this fact in mind when Utah was 
considered. 

Other "exceptions" occur at frequent 
intervals. Vermont gets left on sora 
rails, "excluding mud hens, etc.," until 
the open season of 1918. Wherein Ver- 
mont has offended we do not know. Pos- 
sibly the survey does not approve of an 
excellent State law, recently enacted,, 
which permits the people to breed and 
sell all species of game. 

A closed season on reed-birds or rice- 
birds is provided throughout the year 
except in some favored States — New 
Jersey, South Carolina and others, and. 
the District of Columbia. A proposed, 
crime here and not there ! There and 
not here! Do your own guessing; and 
remember, if the appropriation can be 
increased as contemplated so as to place 
an army of politicians on the various, 
lines, Uncle Sam surely will get you if 
you don't watch out. The bobolink is 
classified in regulation No. 1, subdivi- 
sion (f), as an insectivorous migrant, 
but after he moults and changes his 
name, in some States he becomes a game 
bird. There is an open season in seven 
States and the District of Columbia, Sep- 
tember 1 to October 31. A good smart 
game policeman, using this bird as a de-. 
coy should make a good bag of criminals- 
by working the boundary lines between 
the open and closed States. 

On page 4 we find a closed season for 
woodcock, December 1 to September 30^. 



88 



THE GAME BREEDER 



except as follows: In Illinois and Mis- 
souri the closed season shall continue un- 
til the open season of 1918. On page 4 
we read, "the closed season on woodcock 
shall be between January 1 and October 
31." Probably we are now in another 
"zone," but our head begins to ache and 
we suspend the reading of the regula- 
tions until another evening, when per- 
haps we may undertake to learn some 
more prospective criminal law. Since, 
however, there is an evident desire to 
please kickers, and many are sure to 
kick, we are quite sure we will have to 
renew our studies soon after the regula- 
tions go into effect in order to keep up 
with the changes. 

And the people are presumed to know 
the law! 

We fail to ascertain just what the 
fines or jail sentences may be; possibly 
this information will come later in an- 
other bulletin. The courts might well 
declare such stuff void for uncertainty. 



THE REGULATIONS AND THE 
GAME BREEDERS. 

The Biological Survey seems to be en- 
tirely unaware that most of the States 
recently have amended their game laws 
so as to encourage the breeding of all 
or certain species of game for sport and 
for profit. The so-called "more game" 
movement has become of great economic 
importance. Many thousands of wild 
food birds, both migrants and non-mi- 
grants, now are owned by breeders and 
the proposed regulations should be 
amended so as to provide that the re- 
strictions shall not apply to breeders. 
The States having become aware that it 
is wrong "to protect the game birds off 
the face of the earth," as the eminent 
naturalist, Dr. Shufeldt, has well said, 
it seems a pity for the National Gov- 
ernment to step in and interfere with 
a great food producing industry, which 
Judge Beaman has said is one of the 
coming industries of the country. 

The farmers are especially interested, 
since game breeding rapidly can be made 
a valuable by-product of agriculture. 
The hotel man who would serve the de- 
sirable food and the sportsmen who 



would shoot it and the people who would 
eat it, should not be prevented by law 
from serving, shooting and eating food 
produced by industry. 

Not so long ago the Biological Survey 
issued a bulletin calling attention to the 
vanishing wood-duck, a valuable food 
bird. Some of the States prohibited 
the taking of wood-duck at any time. 
While the wood-duck was being "pro- 
tected off the earth," in America, where 
it is indigenous and once was abundant, 
it rapidly became plentiful in Belgium 
and Holland, where it was introduced 
and was not so "protected." Some game 
breeders now breed hundreds of wood- 
duck in America; one of the members 
of the Game Conservation Society reared 
over a thousand of these birds last sea- 
son and says he will increase his output 
this year. 

Regulation 4 of the proposed regula- 
tions under the Federal migratory bird 
law creates a closed season on wood- 
ducks until September 1, 1918. Since it 
is admitted that this bird most needs 
the breeders' attention, why should the 
incentive to produce it in good numbers 
be removed? Keep the "fool" game 
laws off of the farms where game breed- 
ers are making this bird plentiful and we 
will guarantee that it soon will become 
as abundant as it is in countries where 
there is more freedom from nonsense 
than there is in America. 

When the farmers become fully aware 
that the Biological Survey contemplates 
putting an end to an industry which 
promises to increase the value of the 
farms, we imagine it will become neces- 
sary to have new conferences and new 
hearings on another new set of regula- 
tions. The time to attend to this im- 
portant matter is now. Keep your regu- 
lations off of the game farms. 



GEORGE D. PRATT. 

The Game Conservation Society has 
decided that Mr. George D. Pratt is 
mighty good game conservation commis- 
sioner and The Game Breeder has beer 
directed to make this announcement. 

The fact that Mr. Pratt favored the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



89 



new law opening the New York market 
to game produced by industry in other 
States (as recommended by The Game 
Breeder) is sufficient to make the New 
York commissioner popular with. all who 
prefer "more game" to "more game 
laws." Mr. Pratt should not be blamed 
for only permitting the people to have 
certain species of game to eat. New 
York is the headquarters for game law 
nonsense. It will not be long, we are 
sure, before the profitable breeding and 
sale of all species of game is permitted. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

Editor Game Breeder : 

A sportsman may take "-out a special 
license for $5.00 to bring a deer from 
Maine into New York. After he pays 
$1.00 New York license and $15.00 
Maine non-resident license, he can get 
the deer home if he pays $5.00 more. 
This is ridiculous. F. S. 

New York City. 

[Yes, if nonsense is ridiculous, when some 
graft is attached, it is quite ridiculous. Deer 
should not be so dear. There is a promising 
"revival of common sense" which promises to 
put an end to nonsense.] 
Editor Game Breeder: 

I wish to receive every copy of The 
Game Breeder, as I find it very interest- 
ing and helpful. 

H. S. Little. 

Massachusetts. 



NOTES ABOUT WILD FOWL. 

By E. D. Pickell. 

Mr. E. D. Pickell, in a letter to The 
Game Breeder, says he has about decided 
to move to a warmer climate where he 
can breed all varieties of wild game. 

I notice he says that some Eastern 
breeders claim that mallard drakes will 
mate with four females; that sounds 
strange to me. In all my years of ex- 
perience with wild mallards I have never 
known of a genuine wild mallard drake 
to mate up in the spring with more than 
one female of the genuine wild variety. 
I have had them kill one female when I 
tried to mate them with two. 

Of course you can find scattered all 
over this country breeders who claim to 



have genuine wild mallards. I bought a 
bunch of such birds four years ago. 
After I had paid the express and got 
them out of the crates I was so dis- 
gusted that (I won't say what I said) 
they quickly went the way of the market 
duck. 

I have never been able to mate any 
variety of wild ducks or geese with more 
than one male of genuine wild blood. 
Neither have I ever known of a genuine 
wild mallard female laying when only 
one year old. I have known pintailed 
ducks to do so but never a mallard. 

I notice in my letter in the March 
Game Breeder an error which . I wish 
you would correct. I wrote .you of my 
pair of hybred geese. The paragraph 
reads, "my white-fronted gander crossed 
with a Canada goose." It should have 
read, "a white-fronted gander crossed 
with a Canada goose." I got them from 
the Evans Game Farm in Illinois. Please 
correct this and give Mr. Evans the 
credit which belongs to him. 

Good News From Canada. 

One of our Canadian readers writes 
that the minister in charge of game for 
the Province of Quebec has decided that 
he will issue licenses to any responsible 
persons who wish to go into the business 
of game breeding. and they may acquire 
specimens of the various, birds. 

Mr. Chambers, he says, has suggested 
that a license be made out in the name of 
the writer without any charge whatever,, 
as a starter. 

A good start, surely. 

Trap Shooting Leagues. 

We have received from the Du Pont 
Powder Company, Wilmington, Dela- 
ware, a very good book about "Trap 
Shooting Leagues." Since all of the 
game clubs have traps and shoot many 
clay pigeons our readers will be inter- 
ested in this book. It is for free distri- 
bution. Write for it if you want it. 



The laws should promptly be amended 
everywhere so as to permit the profitable 
breeding of all species of game. 



90 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Champion 

Mississippi Sport 

at Stud, Fee $30,00 

Breed to a real bird dog with 
brains, ambition and the best of 
blood lines. 

R. H. SIDWAY 

147-153 W.Mohawk Street 
Buffalo, N. Y. 




The Best in 
Pointers 

Puppies, Broken Dogs 
and Brood Bitches. by- 
Champion Comanche 
Frank, Fishel's Frank 
and Champion Nicholas 

Write me your wants, please. 

U. R. FISMBL 
Box 35 HOPE. IND. 




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Pioneer 

Dog Remedies 



BOOK ON 

DOG DISEASES 

And How to Feed 

Mailed free to any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY GLOVER, V. S. 
118 West 31st Street, New York 



The Amateur Trainer 

By Ed. F. Haberlein 
A practical trainer of over 30 years' experience, whose 
system is up to date and stands unequaled. 
New Edition Just Out. Illustrated. 
A plain, practical and concise, yet thorough guide 
in the art of training, handling and the correcting 
of faults of the bird do? subservient to the gun 
afield. Written especially for the novice, but 
equally valuable to the experienced handler. By 
following the instructions plainly given, every 
shooter possessed of a little common sense and 
patience can train his own dogs to perfection. 
Paoer cover, $1.00; best full cloth binding and gold 
embossed, fii.50. Address 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 



Membership in Private Hunting and Fishing Preserve 

The Longwood Valley Sportsmen's Club, Controlling the Fishing and 
Hunting Preserve of the late U. S.- Senator John Kean in Upper Longwood 
Valley, Northern New Jersey, invites inquiries from Sportsmen for Mem- 
bership, which is both limited and exclusive. Deer, Pheasants, Quail, 
Partridge Abundant; also Brook, Rainbow and Brown Trout, Large and 
Small Mouth Bass in Lakes and Streams. Two hours by auto from New, 
York. 
Address LONGWOOD VALLEY SPORTSMEN'S CLUB, care The Game Breeder, 

150 Nassau Street, New York City 






THE GAME BREEDER 



91 



?.?6^SP0RTMANS HANDBOOK 



WRITE 
TO DAY 



FREE 



POSTAGE 
PREPAID 




I he 4th Edition of my Sportsman's Handbook is 
ready and I want to send a copy to every man or 
woman who loves the woods/ the~frelds and the inland 
waters. It is the most interesting' and 

Complete Sporting Goods Catalogue 

I have ever written. It not only illustrates and describes 
hundreds of articles for the Camper, Fisherman, Hunter and ' 
h.xplorer, but tells of my experience in the wilds of the United 
" states,. Canada and Mexico. There are pictures of wild animals 
and game birds, and advice as to selection of duffle, pitching a 
tent, caring for firearms, preparing skirls for' the taxidermist 
etc etc there are chapters on how, when and where to Camp, 
t ish and Hunt, and many ' "kinks" in wildcraft. .' 

I will send this book free if you mention No 266 

TVt,n£ y °r u 6 i nte , rested j n .outdoor or indoor games, such as Baseball, 
tennis, Golf Archery, Swimming, Basketball,' Boxing, etc., let me < 
send you Book No. 265. Powhatan Robinson: President 

New York Sporting Goods Co. 



15 and 17 Warren Street 



STATEMENT OF THE OW'nERWTP tvtatvt 

AGEMENT, CIRCULATION ETC R# 

QUIRED BY THE ACT' OF CON 

GRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912 

?t F New E Tork M v B v EEl>E A R ' Published monthly 
x JNew \ork, N. Y., for April 1st, 1916 

STATE of New York 1 « a . 

COUNTY of New Y6ri) SS - • 

and e oonntv e ;f« n0t ^ y PUblic in and for the st ate 
Hnr.JwJl 5 ' af01 u esa i d - Personally appeared D. W. 

cirdIn^ri»w h S haVinS b / en duly sworn a C : 
Editor of Vh7'n deP °% S a ", d says that he is the 
^.aitor of The Game Breeder, and that the fol- 
ding is, to the best of his knowledge and be - 

Igement rU ^r Sta ^ m t e >. nt °/ the owner ^i P# man- 
thV^Jl' X ' 0f - th .? afore said publication for 
^,™ shown in the above caption, required 

Uon4« C p^ w &USt 24 ' 1912 ' embodied in sec- 
tion 443, Postal Laws and Regulations, printed 
on the reverse of this form, to wit: *" lntea 

ii«w Tha i t -< the names *nd addresses of the pub- 
Sanagers are': manafdng editor / and business 

Name of — 
Publisher— The Game Conservation Society, Inc , 
PHiJn 1 ^ St - New York, N. Y. 

York 15 Y untingt °n, 150 Nassau St., New 
Managing Editor— None. 
Business _ Managers— The Game Conservation 

Society, Inc.. 150 Nassau St., New York, 

2- That the owners are: 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 150 
„™^ Nassau St., New York, N. Y 
STOCKHOLDERS— C. B. Davis, Grantwood, 
^ew Jersey. 



New York, U. S. A 



I 

■ 

I 

■ 

I 

■ 

I 

■ 

I 

■ 

■ 
i 

■ 

I 

■ 

I 

i 



F. R. Peixptto, 55 John St., New York, N Y 
A.. A. Hill, 71 Murray St., New York, N.Y. 
D W. Huntington, 150 Nassau St., New 

York. N. Y. 
J. C. Huntington, 150 Nassau St., New 

York, NY.. 

3- That the known bondholders, mortgagees, 
and other security holders owning or holding 1 
per cent or more of total amount of bonds, mort- 
gages, or other securities are: None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giv- 
ing the names of the owners, stockholders and 
security holders, if any, contain not only the list 
of stockholders and security holders as they ap- 
pear upon the books of the company but also, 
in cases where the stockholder or security holder 
appears upon the books of the company as trus- 
tee or in any other fiduciary relation, the name 
of the person or corporation for whom such 
trustee is acting, is given; also that the said 
two paragraphs contain statements embracing 
affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the cir- 
cumstances and conditions under which stock- 
holders and security holders who do not appear 
upon the books of the company as trustees, hold 
stock and securities in a capacity other than 
that of a bona fide owner; and this affiant has 
no reason to believe that any other person, as- 
sociation, or corporation has any Interest direct 
or indirect in the said stock, bonds, or other se- 
curities than as- so -stated- -by him. 

D. W. HUNTINGTON, Editor. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 28th 
day of March, 1916. 

George F. Bentley, 
SEAL Notary Public, 167. 

(My commission expires March 30th, 1916.) 






92 THE GAME BREEDER 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BKEEDEIt 

New York City 



LIVE GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE PHOENIX FOWL 
Egijs lor sale: several varieties. S V. REEVES, 114 
E. Park Ave., Haddonfield, N. J. 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country Black and White 
Swans.Wild Ducks, etc . for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS. Cbincrteague Island. Va. 

WILD TURKEY'S— For orices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. i. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet witn order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES.Dunfield. Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (,oti 

FOR SALE BUFFALO AND FLK IN CAR LOAD 
lots or single. Deer, Antelope. Beaver. Mink, Mountain 
Lion, Pheasants and Game Birds. Eggs in season. 
KENDRICK PHEASANTRIRS, Coronado Building, 
Denver. Colorado. j./b 

5 VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS Wild Mallards, 
Wild Geese and game. Fourteen varieties of stand- 
ard Poultry, including Turkeys. Also Elk. List free. 
G. H HARRIS. Taylorville, 111. 

GOLDEN AND ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANT 

eggs for hatching. May to August. W. S. ALLISON. 

Merrimacport, Mass. 7-76 

PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW, 
ing prices: Mallards. $3.00 per pair. Pintails, $2.50 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $4.00 per pair. Blue Wirg Teal, 
$3 00 per pair. Also redheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for oropa- 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J KLEIN, 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 

GOLDEN PHEASANTS— 810.00 A PAIR EGGS 30c 

each. FRANKLIN J. PITTS, 14 Websier St.. Taunton. 

Mass. y.jb 



SAN LORENZO GAME FARM — BREEDER OF 
all kinds of pheasants ; eggs in season ; also birds 
for sale at all times Visitors welcome. Write for 
price list. Mrs. S. MATTHI ESSEN, San Lorenzo, 
Alameda Co., California. 7^76 



CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATED PHEASANT BREED- 
ERS. Pheasants. Quail, Mallard price list. FRED D. 
HOYT, Hayward, Cal. 



GAME EGGS 



RING NECK PHEASANT EGGS FROM CHOICE 

stock. Order now for early deliverv. $2 50 per setting 

of is eggs. EDWARD W. DOLAN, Worthington. 

Minn. 5-16 



WILD MALLARD DUCK EGGS— APRIL TO MAY 
15, 1016 $15.00 per hundred. May 16 to July 5. 1916, 
$12 00 per hunded. Safely packed (send draft). Order 
at once. First cme, first served (no limit, no discount) 
C. BREMAN CO.. Danville. Illinois. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE: STRICTLY FRESH 
and fertile. I am now booking orders for spring and 
summer. Amherst, Golden, Silver. GRAY PHEAS- 
ANTRIES, Ward Street, Orange, New Jersey. 

EGGS FROM RINGNECK PHEASANTS. MALLARD 
ducks. All the popular breeds of hith grade chickens. 
MILL ROAD POUITRY FARM. Apple Grove 
Virginia. 5-ib' 

WILD MALLARD DUCK EGGS FOR SALE-FROM 

wild stock this season ; also Ring-Neck Pheasant eggs. 
From largest breeding farm in the south. H. A. BEASLEV, 
Carroll Island Club, Continental Trust Building, Balti- 
more, Md. 

WILD AND BRONZE TURKEY EGGS, CHICKEN 

eggs. Handsome catalog showing pure wild gobbler 
from the mountain. VALLEY VIEW POULTRY FARM, 
Belleville, Pa. 

MALLARD EGGS. FROM SELECT WINNERS, 
#3.50 per 13, $25.00 per hundred; from utility stock, $2 00. 
per 13, $15.00 per hundred Eaily eggs bring bettrr re- 
sults Enter order now. CLYDh. B. TERRELL, Natur- 
alist. Depi. P2. Oshkosh, Wis 

RINGNECK, SILVER AND GOLDEN PHEASANT 
eggs for sale. Pure stock anil fresh eggs only. Reason- 
able. W. L. EDISON, Mornstown, N. J. 



GAME BIRDS WANTED 

WANTED— MONGOLIAN AND RINGNECK PHEAS- 
ANTS and deer for breeding Also cub bear Give- 
description and prices. CLARE WILLARD, Allegany. 
New York. 

WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX, 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hi ki and German 
Peacock Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number R A. CHILES. 
& CO.. Mt Sterling. Ky. 

WANTED— FANCY AVIARY PHEASANTS, RING- 

necks. peacocks, partridges, quail, prairie chickens, 

»ood and mandarin ducks. Quote prices. ROBER'! 

HUTCHINSON, Littleton, Colo. 

DEER WANTED -Wanted, one pair of adult fallow deer 

State price. A C. C, care of The Game Breeder, 150 

Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



GAMEKEEPER.S 



SITUATION WANTED— HEAD GAMEKEEPER OI 
Superintendent of large estate or game preserve. Very 
capable man to show sport. Thoroughly experienced 
rearing pheasants, partridge, quail and wild ducks. 
Management of incubators hatching pheasant and duck 
eggs. Also breeding, training and handling high class 
shooting dogs. Excellent trapper, competent manager. 
Reference present employer. GAMEKEEPER, 157 East 
69th St., New York. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters : "Yours for More Game.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



93 



•GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION, UNDER- 
stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 
*his country. Address M. F.. care of The Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau Street. New York. 



WANTED-SOBER, INDUSTRIOUS. EXPERIENCED 
man to raise Pheasants and Turkeys. Will pay a moderate 
salary and liberal share of profits. Address giving full 
details of qualifications. CHAS. B. WOOD, Hadlyme, 
>Conn. 



UNDERKEEPER—WANTED A GOOD MAN WHO 
thoroughly understands pheasant rearing, willing and 
■obliging. Age aboui 24 years. Send full particular! of 
references to REARER, care of The Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St , New York City 7~ib 



WANTED— SITUATION 
As Superintendent or Manager on a game farm or 
preserve. Experienced in game and poultry breeding. 
Good reason for aesiring change of location. Would 
take an interest in a game farm to breed game com- 
mercially. Address C. McM., office of The Game 
Breeder, no Nassau Street, New York City. 



REAL ESTATE 



GAME BREEDING FARM WANTED 
Wanted to purchase or rent a small place_ in one 
of the Eastern States where game breeding is legal. 
A small farm with a pond and stream is desired. 
State price and location. M. A. C., care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



BUNGALOW FOR SALE OR RENT 

HAVE WELL BUILT BUNGALOW IV THE MOUN- 
tains of Ulster Co., N.Y., 2 hours from N.Y.City and half- 
hour from Poughkeepsie. Bungalow contains 6 rooms, 
good artesian well and first-class outbuildings. Will rent 
furnished or unfurnishedforihecomingsummer. Address 
E DAYTON, 26 Bergen Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 



WANTED PARTNER-TO TAKE AN INTEREST 
in a deer par k and preserve near New York. 150 acres 
fenced with eight foot fence, containing deer and an 
abundance of ruffed grouse Two trout streams and 
solendid water for wild duck breeding. G. B.. care of The 
Game Breeder. 150 Nassau St., New York Citv. 



FOODS 



WHITE'S PRESERVE -WILD CELERY AND ALL 
kinds of wild duck food, plants and seeds. Also enter- 
tain sportsmen. Waterlily, Currituck Sound, Ncrtn Caro- 
lina. . 

WILD DUCKS' NATURAL FOODS Will attract 
them ( he>-e loods collected, examinations made, plant- 
ings planned and superintended. Write for free infor- 
mation CLYDE B TERRELL, Specialist on the Natural 
Foods of Wild Ducks, Dept. Pi, Oshkosh, Wis. 



MEAL WORMS FOR BIRDS, FOR SALE BY THE 
hundred or in large quantities 25c. per hundred. Write 
for prices for larger lots. WM. sTOFHREGN, 124-126 
4th Ave., New York City. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

REARING PHEASAVTS IN SMALL ENCLOSURES. 
Price, 20 Cents. It contains nothing that has not been 
thoroughly and successfully tried out in actual practice. 
S. V. REEVES, Haddonrield, N. J. 



SEND 25 CENTS FOR INFORMATION AND PRICE 
list of the most profitable furbearing animal, the Black 
Siberian Hare. SIBERIAN HARE CO., Hamilton, 
Canada. 

BLACK SIBERIAN HARE; $10 per pair, $15 per trio 
JOHN W. TALBOT, South Bend, Indiana. 

AIREDALE PUPPIES, BEST BREEDING, MANY 
champions in pedigree. Also Golden Pheasant Eggs. 
MRS. A. E. THOMPSON, Williamsburg, Va. 



DOGS 

AIREDALE PUPPIES, BEST BREEDING, MANY 
champions in pedigree. Also Golden Pheasant Eggs. 
MRS. A. E. THOMPSON, Williamsburg, Va. 

NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
English bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds, American fox- 
hounds, lion, cat, aeer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. All 
trained. Shipped on trial. Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded. Purchaser to decide. Fifty page highly 
illustrated catalogue, 5c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
otter for sale setters and pointers, tox and cat hounds 
wolf and deer nounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion nounds, also Atie- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
tunded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue lor ten cents in stamps or coin. 



GAME KEEPER WANTED 

WANTED— I HAVE A FARM OF ABOUT 450 

acres, and i want to get hold of a good man who 
thoroughly understands game breeding and the 
stocking of a game farm. . I do riot want a head- 
keeper or under-keeper, but a good man who can 
do this work himself without a lot of assistants, 
because there really isn't a great deal to be done. 

I have a nice, new house with three bedrooms, 
porcelain bath, running water in kitchen and bath, 
and a man with. a small family can be thoroughly 
comfortable. 

My farm is situated in Maryland, near Balti- 
more. I have no plans for an elaborate estate 
with headkeepers and underkeepers, but do want 
to get hold of a gqod, sensible, level-headed game 
man, who understands his business and is willing 
to do whatever is to be done around the farm, 
breed the game for it and keep game there. This 
is an excellent opening for the kind of man I am 
looking for. ■ '> 

Address, STUART OLIVIER, Room 529 Mun- 
sey Building, Baltimore, Md. * 



WANTED— ASSISTANT GAME KEEPER, FAMIL- 
iar with the rearing and care of ducks and pheas- 
ants. Salary $40.00 per month and lodging. 

ROBERT GOELET, 9 West 17th St., New York. 



Knowledge Wanted. 

The U. S. Biological Survey has de- 
cided that it don't know about the Black 
Siberian Hare. Write Siberian Hare 
Company, Hamilton, Canada. We have 
never seen this hare. 

In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



Apply the game laws to tame turkeys 
and soon there would be no tame tur- 
keys. 

The laws should permit reputable 
breeders to trap game on their farms for 
propagation. 



94 



THE GAME BREEDER 



GAME BIRDS 

TOR PROPAGATING PURPOSES 

Genuine Wild Mallards, Black Duck, Green-wing and Blue- 
wing Teal, Pintails, Gadwalls, Shovellers, Wood Duck, Widgeon, 
Red- heads, Blue-bills, also a few pairs of extra choice Canvas-backs 
and Ring-bills; Canadian, Greater and Lesser Snow, Ross, Brant, 
Hurchins. Cackling and Blue Geese, supplied for propagating 
purposes. Finest quality in the country. 

Golden, Silver, Amherst, Reeves Pheasants at reasonable prices. 
I also am booking orders for ring-neck Pheasants reared on my 
preserve for delivery in early fall. 

I also have rare land and waterfowl from all parts of the world. 
Prices quoted for the asking. 

JOHN HEYWOOD, Gardner, Mass. 

Farms for the Propagation of Wild Fowl. 



Wild Mallard Eggs 

From Select Stock: 

$25.00 per 100 
3.50 per 13 




From Utility Stock: 

$15.00 per J 00 
2.00 per 13 

Clyde B. Terrell 
Oshkosh - Wisconsin 



All eggs from the very finest stock 
obtainable. Mated to non-related males 
to insure a high degree of fertility. 

Greatest possible vitality in young 
stock. 



Until May 1 5th 

Ringneck and Mallard Eggs, 
$25.00 a hundred 

Mongolian, $40.00 a hundred 



Packed in special crates to 
insure safe arrival. 

RIVER LAWN PARM 

1 47-1 53 West Mohawk St., BUFFALO, N. Y. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



95 







Mallards — Drakes — Ducks — Eggs 

FOR SALE AT ATTRACTIVE PRICES 

The birds are strong on the wing. The eggs are gathered 
daily and are shipped promptly. 



ROBERT ALBIN 

ISLIP, LONG ISLAND - - NEW YORK 



U7 RITE US for Prices 
on ringnecks deliver- 
able in July, August or 
September as you may 
desire, also Mallard. We 
handle sixteen other varie- 
ties of pheasants, all varie- 
ties peafowl, wild turkey 
and fancy ducks. 

Send 30 cents stamps 
for colortype catalogue. 



CHILES & CO. 



Mount Sterling, 



Kentucky 



Wild Duck Foods 

SAGO POND WEED AND OTHERS 

If you wish to grow a wild duck food, 
that will grow anywhere except in salt 
water, and the very best duck food 
known, plant Sago Pond Weed, roots or 
seed. We will refer you to people who 
are growing it abundantly, and they 
will tell you how it has improved their 
shooting. Sago is what has held the 
ducks, geese and swans in Currituck for 
the past 90 years, where they have been 
shot at more than any other place in 
American. 

We also ship wild celery roots and 
seeds Chara, Widgeon grass roots, Red 
head grass and Wild rice roots. We will 
not ship Wild rice seed. 

JASPER B. WHITE 

WATERULY, CURRITUCK SOUND, N. C 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



96 THE GAME BREEDER 



PHEASANTS, DUCKS AND EGGS 

Deer And Other Live Game 

FOR SALE, a superb lot of Golden, Silver and Amherst pheasants just 
right for breeding this spring and summer. 

I am now booking orders for eggs of the following varieties: Mon- 
golian, Ringneck, Chinese, Golden, Silver, Amherst and Reeves. 

Wood Duck, Mallard and Gray Call Duck eggs. 

All the eggs I ship are guaranteed to be from non-related, pure 
bred, strong, healthy birds, correctly mated; all eggs are guaranteed not to 
be over three days old when they leave my farm. 

I also manufacture a full line of special foods for the successful raising 
of young pheasants and wild water fowl, also for feeding the old birds 
all the year 'round ; write for prices. 

WALLACE EVANS GAME f ARM, ST. CHARLES, ILL. 

Largest and most successful breeders of pheasants, 
wild water fowl, deer, etc., in the world. 



STONY LONESOME GAME f ARM 

! 

Mallard Ducks and 
Mongolian Pheasants 

We offer for immediate delivery (limited number) of 

Mallard Ducks and Mongolian Pheasants 

and will take orders for eggs, delivery in the spring. 



ADDRESS 

1 29 Front Street, New York City, 

or JOHN FOSTER, West Hartland, Connecticut 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters : "Yours for More Game.' 





Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
Partridges and Pheasants. 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

Royal 8w«nI e of t »n»limn I li A 7 e h rica ^ t T ,,n ™ t ? 1 h J rds . a , nd anima1 ^ M / P^d, now contain nearly SOO bet* 
PEUCAvf AKo STORk't rV^R-^P^ir^a', ? eauU ^^ n I , k FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
<■ Also blOKKS, CRANES. PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
111 ^ d „ fan< T ™ EAS ANTS All stock is/kept under practically natuUSu^s ^ 

or la. , devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER. LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc" 

Order* booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

ore buying elsewhere— U will par you to do •<>. Your visit solicit »> 
1 am only 60 miles from New York and 30 mile« from Philadelpl 

WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY. BUCKS COUNTY. PA. 



vm *VH 




: '^S^W 


1 £3*1* ij 








fr" * 


■~j 



rtmml V. 



r 



There is no food like 



SPRATT'S 




\U5^ 



obtainable. SPRATT'S 
CRISSELtakes the place of 
am 1 the natural 

insect food consumed 
the birds in the free st, 
and this reason is 

ureat value i njr and 

ned pheasant 



GAME FOODS MANUFACTURED BY SPRATT'S PATENT are: 

SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL No. 12 (For Pheasant, Partridge 
and Quail Chicks ). 

SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL No. 5 I For young Pheasant 

SPRATT'S PHEASANT FOOD No. 3 | For adult birds). 

SPRATT'S MAXCO (Tl st nourishing food obtainable 

SPRATT'S PRAIRIE MEAT "CRISSEL" (Takes the pla \nts 

>gs and is a perl 



jtitute for insect life 




SPRATT'S WILD DUCK MEAL (The I >od for ducklings 

SPORTSMEN on hunting trips will do well 

for th< or 

hundred pounds 

SPRATT'S DOG CAKES 

will take up littl id will furnish sufficient food in th 

n.pmical form, with the lea -sible exp< r the entire trip. 

r dogs in the field where hard work is required, we manui 
tvtre a biscuit containing an extra entage of meat. 

Send 25c. for "Phe; ulture." 10c. for "I 

2c. stamp for "Dog Cultur 

SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED, NEWARK, N. J. 



n 



1j=t; 



MAR 12 1921 




#loo perYear 




Single Copies 10 




THt 



JULY, 1916 



The- Object op this magazine is 

to Make- Noeth Am erica the 5iggest 

Game Producing Country in the World 



■'■ ™f- ' ■ ■ :■:■■' 



" ■ ■■" . ■ :. ■• ■ 














No, 



f»j 



z^; 



^SJi»V 






vvhen a Covey Flushes with a \vhir-r-r 
at Your Feet^ 

or the trap toy rings in an unexpected angle on 
you — it s a moment to make a man glad of the 
"Speed Shells in his gun — Remington UMC 
steel lined smokeless shells. 

Sportsmen everywhere are noting the consistently 
satisfactory snooting results achieved every day with 
"Arrow and "Nitro Club shells at traps and afield. 
There are thousands of good old guns and new that 
mean much more to their owners since the change from 
ordinary shells to Remington UMC. 

The steel lining makes the mam difference. It 
grips the powder and keeps all the drive of the explo- 
sion right behind the charge — the fastest snot shells in 
the world. 

I oull find the Remington UMC "Arrow and 
'Nitro Club smokeless shells and the 'New Club 
black fiowder shells at Sportsmen s Headquarters in 
every town — the dealer who displays the Red Ball 
J^lark of Remington JjJ^lC. 

THE REMINGTON ARMS UNION METALLIC 

CARTRIDGE COMPANY 

Largest ^Manufacturers of Firearms and Ammunition in the World 

"Woolworth Building, New York 



THE GAME BREEDER 



97 




Write for a- Copy 
of This Book 



EVERY sportsman should have a copy 
of "Game Farming for Profit and 
Pleasure. ; ' If you are a lover of the 
woods and fields and the wild game that 
inhabits them you will find this book of in- 
tense interest and undoubted value. It is 
sent free to those who write for it 

"Game Farming for Profit and Pleasure" is a 
carefully edited and profusely Illustrated manual on 
the breeding of game birds. It describes in detail 
the habits, foods and enemies of wiid turkeys, pheas- 
ants, grouse, quail, wild ducks, and related species. 
It tehs of the best methods for rearing. It discusses 
the questions of marketing and-hunting. 

The breeding of game birds is profitable and 

Game Breeding Department, Room 201 

HERCULES POWDEI^CO. 

Wilmington, Delaware 

Manufacturers of Explosives; Infallible and "E. C." Smokeless Shotgun Powders; L. & R. Orange Extra Black Sporting Powder; 
Dynamite for Fanning. 

Game Breeding Department, Room 201 

Hercules Powder Company, Wilmington, Delaware 

Gentlemen: — Please send me a copy of Game Farming for Profit and „ 

Pleasure. I am interested in game breeding from the standpoint of Name ............................ , ............■■■■■■ i ■ 



pleasant for many reasons. The demand for birds, 
both from city markets and from those who wish to 
raise game, is much greater than the supply. There 
is also a continuous call for eggs by breeders. 

Furthermore the birds you raise will afford you 
good sport in hunting, aud also food for your table. 
If you own large acreage, you may lease the privi- 
lege of shooting over your land to those who will 
gladly pay for it. 

If you cannot raise game yourself we will try to 
put you in touch with those who will raise it for 
you to shoot. The more game raised, the more 
good hunting there will be for you and the more 
often you will enjoy game on your table. 

But the book tells the whole story. Sreo will 
find it most interesting reading. Write for your 
copy today. Use the coupon below. 





98 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

A Practical Book on the Breeding of Wild Fowl 
for Sport and for Profit 

With Numerous Illustrations. 

Contains chapters on the Preservation of Snipe and Woodcock. 

Many readers of the Game Breeder have bred thousands of Wild Ducks 
by following the instructions in this book. 



DUCK BREEDING IS PROFITABLE. 



PRICE, $1.50; Special Signed Edition, $2.00. 



THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, New York 



Heating and Cooking Stoves for 
Clubs and Cottages 

The Camp Cook Stove 



This is an ideal cook stove for the 
Mining:, Lumber and Militaiy 
Camps; will work just as well in 
the open air as indoors. 

Construction Companies working 
large gangs of men will find this 
well suited to their requirements. 




IRONSIDES 



A FEW OF THE LEADING STOVES FURNISHED 



Radnor Ranges 
Home Victor Ranges 
Victor Cook DobuleOven 

Ranges 
Hotel Ranges 
Royal Victor Ranges 
No. 10 Ironsides Cook 
Patrol Wood Stove 
No. go Ironsides 
Haddon Ranges 



Home Victor Hot Water Stoves 

Farmer Girl Cook 

New H. A. Elm Double Heaters 

Vulcan Double Heaters 

Tropic Sun Heating Stoves 

Haddon Hercules Heating Stoves 

Ormond Ranges 

No. 15 Hot Blast Heating Stoves 

Victor Gem Cook 

Laundry Stoves 



Index Heating Stoves 
Solar Kent Heating 

Stoves ' 
Prompt Ranges 
Cozy Ranges 
Victor Cook Ranges 
Loyal Victor Ranges 
Victor Hotel Ranges 
Elm Ranges 
Farmer Boy Cook Stoves 



Our Friend Cook Stoves 
Sentry Wood Stoves 
Home Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Home Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Solar Cellar Furnaces 
Farmer's Furnaces and 

Cauldrons 



Manufactured by 



S. V. REEVES, 45 N. 2nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters : "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



99 




Scenes at Last Year's G. A. H. 



Don't Miss the Big Shoot. 

Bigger and better than ever this year — handsome trophies 
for the winners — an outing full of pleasure and a tournament 
that will test your gunskill to the limit. Make sure to be 
on hand for the 

GRAND AMERICAN HANDICAP, 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 



August 21 to 25. 



Ten traps will be in operation. Ideal conditions are anticipated. 
All of the country's shooting stars will be there and every man will 
have his chance to win the Nation's Shooting Honors and the 
trophy that goes with them. Get ready now — come and bring the 
folks. St. Louis is easily accessible and there's a good time in 
store for all. 

Plan Your Vacation To Include G. A. H. Week. 

For program and special information write to E. Reed Shaner,- 
Sec'y Interstate Association, 219 Coltart Avenue, Pittsburgh, 
Pa., or The Sporting Powder Division of 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, 

592 Du Pont Building, Wilmington, Del. 

To reach the shooting grounds take Delmar car on Olive Street to Delmar Garden — auto service thence 

to the grounds. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



100 THE GAME BREEDER 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field — Good Work in Iowa — An Educational Game 

Farm — The Iowa Game Department To the Members of the Senate 

— The Game Breeders' Interest — Hen Pheasants Survey of Our Field 

— Advice to Members—Advice to Game Breeders — The Ohio Fox 

Parcel Post Shipment of Game — No Animal Heads in Mail. 

The Black Siberian Hare ------ A. Goldberg 

Fish Raising for the Average Farmer - - Providence Journal 

How to Organize A Game .Breeding Association D. W. Huntington 

A Real Rabbit Drive - - - - - - - J. W. Walden 

George A. Lawyer, Administrator - - - David F. Lane 

Three Important Wild Duck Foods - - - W. L. McAtee 

The Remington Celebration. 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves - By Our Readers 

More About Snakes, J. D. Foote— Food for Wild Ducks— A State's 
Attack on Hawks — Ants and Ant Eggs — The Egg Market — Now is the 
Time— Bob White Plentiful— Pheasants— The Crow Call. 
Editorials — The Important Sago — Iowa. 
Correspondence — Outings and Innings, Etc, 



To THE GAME BREEDER, 

150 Nassau Street, New York. 

Please send me THE GAME BREEDER, for one year. 

$1.00 enclosed. 

Name 

Street 

City... 

State 

N. B.— Write Name and Street Address plainly and state if you 
wish back numbers of the .magazine to the first of the year. 



T he Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter. July g, 1915, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



VOLUME IX 



JULY, 1916 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 4 



Good Work in Iowa. 

One of our Iowa readers says the last 
Legislature of Iowa was the first to 
make any provision for game breeding 
in this State ; the amendment provides : 

"Any person desiring to engage in 
the business of raising and selling 
pheasants, wild duck, quail and other 
game birds or any of them in a wholly 
enclosed preserve or enclosure of which 
he is the owner or lessee, may make ap- 
plication in writing to the State Fish and 
Game Warden for a license so< to do. 
That the State Fish and Game Warden, 
when it shall appear that such application 
is made in good faith, shall upon the 
payment of an annual fee of $2 issue to 
such applicant a breeder's license per- 
mitting such applicant to breed and raise 
the above described game birds or other 
game birds, or any of them, on such 
preserve or enclosure ; and to sell the 
same alive at any time for breeding or 
stocking purposes; and to kill and use 
the same ; or sell same for food. Such 
license must be renewed annually upon 
the payment of the fee as hereinbefore 
set forth and the possession of such 
license shall exempt the license holder 
from the penalties of this chapter for 
killing, having in possession or selling 
the game birds or any of them set forth 
in this section ; provided that said birds 
have been bred and raised upon the said 
preserve or within said enclosure by the 
license holder or secured by him by pur- 
chase from without the State of Iowa." 

An Educational Game Farm. 

Mr. E. C. Hinshaw, the State Fish and 
Game Warden, says he is endeavoring to 
build and maintain a large game farm 



and run it in a way to use it as an educa- 
tional place for those who are interested 
in that line of work. He also writes : 
"We are doing considerable in the way 
of destroying vermin around the game 
reserves where we are stocking the place 
with birds and hope to arrange so that 
all of these places will be patrolled not 
only for the protection of the birds from 
hunters but for the destroying of those 
things that are enemies of bird life." 

The Iowa Game Department. 

The Iowa State game department 
should soon become of great economic 
importance to all the people of the State. 
Those who shoot will find the shooting 
much improved just as it has been in 
Massachusetts and other States where 
many people are engaged in breeding 
game for profit as well as for sport. 
The people of Iowa soon will have an 
abundance of game to eat during long 
open seasons. The hotels will be pleased 
to learn that soon they can serve game 
to their guests and the dealers will be 
quite willing to sell the desirable food. 

It is to be hoped that the Iowa game 
farm will plant fields especially for the 
prairie grouse and quail and will demon- 
strate that it is an easy matter to have 
these birds abundant and evenly distrib- 
uted in every field on a farm and that 
the abundance will not only be found 
detrimental to agriculture but highly 
beneficial. The cost of rearing quail and 
grouse in a wild state is very small 
when compared with the hand rearing 
of pheasants since the wild bred birds 
will find most of their food in the fields 
and woods. We predict that Iowa soon 
will become a big game producing State 



102 



THE GAME BREEDER 



and that the game when properly handled 
will add much to the value of the farms. 

To the Members of the Senate: 

A communication, addressed to the 
United States Senate, from the New 
Mexico Game Protective Association, 
and signed by Miles W. Burford and 
Robert E. Dietz, the president and secre- 
tary, contains the following as published 
in The Sportsmen's Review : 

The Agricultural Appropriation Bill, bear- 
ing an appropriation of $50,000 for the enforce- 
ment of the Federal Migratory Bird Law, will 
soon come before the Senate. Because this 
law restricts their shooting privileges and pre- 
vents the old and fatal practice of "spring 
shooting," the Interstate "Sportsmen's" Asso- 
ciation, headed by Missouri, will launch an 
attack seeking to kill this law by defeating the 
appropriation for its enforcement. Failing 
this, they will, according to their announced 
intention, seek its repeal. 

This law is the most important single item 
of progressive game legislation in the United 
States, and this attack menaces the interests 
of 5,000,000 American sportsmen and of all 
generations to come. Our association, repre- 
senting 1,000 New Mexico sportsmen, most 
earnestly urges you, and all other progressive 
Senators, to 

1. Be on the "firing line." 

2. Stand for the migratory bird law. 

3. Expose the Missouri lobby. 

4. Defeat the "game hogs" once for all, 
and more than that, give the Secretary of 
Agriculture $100,000 with which to enforce 
this just law. 

When we apply the term "game hog" to the 
leaders of the Interstate Sportsmen's Asso- 
ciation, we speak not lightly nor abusively, but 
with earnest regret based on full knowledge 
of the facts. A bare outline of their argu- 
ments and actions ought to convince any un- 
prejudiced students of facts of the cynical self- 
ishness which underlies this movement. We 
will try to be very brief. 

Here follows a lengthy argument that 
the law has caused an increase in wild 
fowl; that all the District Courts have 
not declared it unconstitutional; that 
quail cannot stand a long open season, 
etc. 

Mr. A. D. Holthouse, of St. Louis, in 
the same publication, points out that the 
New Mexico sportsmen might secure a 
State law protecting song birds and 
stopping the spring shooting of wild 
fowl. 

The Game Breeders' Interest. 

We have pointed out that game breed- 



ers should be excepted from the pro- 
visions of the migratory bird law as 
they now are from many State protective 
laws. Rapidly they are making the 
game plentiful and they are sending the 
food they produce to the markets. We 
can hardly believe it possible that Con- 
gress will appropriate $100,000 or- any 
other sum to enforce the criminal absurd- 
ities promulgated by the Biological Sur- 
vey until they have been amended so as 
to provide that they shall not apply to a 
big food producing industry which many 
States are encouraging by game breeders' 
enactments. If the law shall be declared 
constitutional we sincerely hope it can 
be made to except those who produce 
game birds. It would seem to be wise to 
let the courts pass on it before appro- 
priating a large sum to execute the pro- 
posed criminal absurdities. 

Hen Pheasants. 

A writer in The Oregon Sportsman 
favors the law prohibiting the shooting 
of hen pheasants and says : 

We have several times seen a cat attack a 
hen pheasant, and yet make no effort to 
spring at a big male bird. In other words, out 
of twenty hens and twenty males in the wild 
state the chances are that not one of the 
cocks would be caught or killed by hawks, 
owls, cats and some of the other predatory 
animals, where ten or twelve of the females 
would be killed. After the first few days of 
the shooting season the cocks become much 
wilder than the females. They are more able 
to take care of themselves while the females 
lie closer to a dog and are more likely to be 
killed. Every sportsman, therefore, or any 
other person interested in the real protection 
of the Chinese Pheasant and keeping up the 
future supply, should refrain from killing hen 
pheasants. 

In the first place the Chinese Pheasants are 
polygamous in nature. They are entirely po- 
lygamous when kept in captivity and they are 
to a large extent polygamous in the wild state. 
If there are as many cocks as hens in the wild 
state, the birds will pair off, yet if there arc 
more hens than cocks the hens will be cared 
for much the same as they are in the tame 
state where a cock is kept in a pen with from 
four to six females. 

The most vital reason why the hen should 
not be killed is that she is a smaller bird than 
the cock and less able to protect herself in 
the wild state. At the State Game Farm, for 
instance, where cocks and hens are kept in an 
open field, they are sometimes attacked by 
hawks and owls. In over thirty birds that 
were caught in this field by hawks and owls, 



THE GAME BREEDER 



103 



every single one was a hen. Although the 
cock stands out in the open, he is strong and 
big and able to protect himself, while the hen 
is not. 

Since on another page in the same 
publication the statement is made, quot- 
ing the Silverton Appeal, that "the days 
of the hunting dog are numbered," we 
think it would be a good plan for the 
State Game Department to suggest to 
the county rod and gun clubs that they 
arrange with the farmers to have some 
good shooting on the farms at both hens 
and cocks with the aid of good dogs. 
Every game protective association should 
have a good shooting ground for its mem- 
bers and the farmers can furnish the 
ground as they now do in other States at 
reasonable rates. 



Survey of Our Field. 

The country is so big that there is 
plenty of room even for a few thousand 
more game laws, state, provincial, na- 
tional, migratory, etc., etc. All we ask is 
that they be kept off of the farms used 
for game. As an experiment, a few of 
them might be applied to poultry. At the 
end ,of a year or two, at most, there 
would not be a single fowl alive. There 
is plenty of room for the quiet refuges 
for game where foxes and other vermin 
can feast on it. Our field really seems to 
be a narrow one. We only concern our- 
selves about the interests of those who 
wish to have an abundance of game and 
game fish for sport or for profit. Being 
specialists, however, we are always on 
the job. We help to reform the laws; 
we help create game farms, shoots and 
preserves ; we plan for many small breed- 
ers, and we see that every one who 
wants game or game fish is sure to have 
an abundance, and that those who sell 
game get good prices. 

Advice to Game Breeders. 

Game breeders who advertise in the 
magazine should remember that it is per- 
sistent advertising which pays. No mat- 
ter if one has sold out he should not drop 
out of sight on that account. He surely 
will find his customers making new ac- 
quaintances and purchasing elsewhere. 
Without much trouble an advertiser can 



procure from another reliable breeder the 
eggs or birds which his customer wants 
and often he can make at least a small 
profit on the transaction since breeders 
often are willing to accommodate each 
other. We are sure from what they have 
told us that those who keep in all the 
time have better results than those who 
only send an advertisement at certain 
seasons. Prospective customers are most 
likely to send orders to those whose ad- 
vertisements are always before them. 

The magazine is doing a big work for 
its advertisers, opening whole States to 
the game breeding industry and reducing 
the restrictions everywhere. Adver- 
tisers who appreciate this work adver- 
tise by the year. 

Advice to Members. 

Members of the Game Conservation 
Society should and, we believe, to a large 
extent, they do patronize those who sup- 
port the magazine by advertising in it. 
When we go to visit the numerous game 
clubs we are always pleased to' find the 
shooters using the birds, eggs, foods, guns 
and ammunition advertised in The Game 
Breeder. 

The Ohio Fox. 

In comments upon the State game 
laws appears the statement that it is 
against the law to kill or injure foxes in 
Ohio, says J. W. Lippincott. Is there 
any wild fox, he asks, that does not 
destroy more birds, more four-footed 
game animals and more chickens than a 
hawk? These things, he says, may be- 
come live issues in other States and it 
is well to carefully consider them. 

Since many game protective associa- 
tions have developed a wonderful appe- 
tite for game laws among many sports- 
men it seems impossible to secure any 
simple uniform and stable laws relating 
to the taking of game and the control of 
vermin. All we ask is to keep the game 
laws and the vermin laws off of the game 
farms and preserves where game is 
plentiful and where restrictive laws if 
they should be executed or obeyed surely 
would exterminate the game. We have' 
arranged in many States to have game 
breeders' enactments which in effect ex- 
empt the places where game is made plen- 



104 



THE GAME BREEDER 



tiful from the ever-changing game, fox, 
hawk, crow and other vermin enactments 
which are a never failing delight to those 
who prefer the game law industry to 
game breeding or field sports. 

We regard it as a fine thing to see the 
game rapidly restored to the market. It 
has added much to the value of many 
country places. We would advise M'r. 
Lippincott to cease thinking about 
whether the things he refers to, "may 
become live issues in other States," and 
to devote his energies to seeing that the 
farms which have game become exempt 
from the ever changing "live issues," 
which too often destroy the value of 
country places which should receive an 
excellent revenue from their game. 

* 

No Animal Heads in Mails. 

Reno, Nev., March 25. — Coyote and 
wild cat heads by parcel post proved too 
much for the patience of Fred L. White, 
postmaster of Reno, and he took the 
question of the right to make such ship- 
ments by mail up with the Postmaster 
General. He has just received informa- 
tioa that such articles are not mailable 
and cannot be delivered if mailed. The 
heads have been coming in lately in large 
numbers from different parts of the 
States. They are sent in to the State 
University for examination for rabies. — 
The World, New York. 



Parcel Post Shipments of Game. 

The Fish and Game Commission has 
been making such a strenuous fight 
against the market hunters who* ship 
their game to the San Francisco mar- 
kets by express, that it has become ex- 
ceedingly dangerous for the shippers to 
send illegally shipped birds by that 
method ; the chances of having them con- 
fiscated are too many. Some of the 
hunters for a time resorted to the mails, 
sending birds by parcel post, knowing 
that the deputies of the Commission did 
not have the same opportunity to inspect 
postal shipments as they did express. 

Investigation showed that according to 
the California law, all game offered for 
shipment must be at all times in open 
view. The postal regulations provide 
that game must be carefully wrapped in 
order to prevent damage to other mail 



matter. But the United States regula- 
tions also provide that all game offered 
for shipment must be strictly in accord 
with all of the provisions of the State 
laws, 

How these conflicting provisions have 
been brought into accord is explained by 
the following letter received from the 
post office department at Washington: 

Washington, D. C, Jan. 28, 1916. 

Fish and Game Commission, 

Mills Building, 

San Francisco, California. 

Gentlemen: Receipt is acknowledged 
of your communication of the 17th in- 
stant advising this office that 

"Section 627b of the Penal Code 

of the State of California provides 

that game offered for shipment or 

transportation must be at all times 

in open view." 

In reply I have to say that the Act of 
Congress of March 4, 1909, 35 Stat. 
1137, embodied in section 477 }4, Postal 
Laws and Regulations, a copy of which 
is enclosed, prohibits the shipment of 
dead bodies, or parts thereof, of any 
game animals or birds killed or offered 
for shipment in violation of the laws of 
the State, territory or district in which 
killed or offered for shipment, and since 
the laws of the State of California do 
not permit the shipment of the dead 
bodies of animals or birds when 
wrapped, postmasters in that State must, 
of course, govern themselves accord- 
ingly. The dead bodies of wild animals 
or birds may be accepted for transmis- 
sion in the mails only when wrapped so 
as to prevent injury to other mail, and 
it is not practicable to handle shipments 
of such matter by parcel post in the 
manner required by the California laws. 
Respectfully, 
(Signed) A. M. DOCKERY, 
Third Assistant Postmaster General. 
— California Fish and Game. 

Old Corn. 

Almost as much interest is being man- 
ifested in Kansas over some Aztec corn 
1,000 years old as would be stirred up 
in Kentucky upon the receipt of some 
corn juice of similar antiquity. — Arkan- 
sas Gazette. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



105 



THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE. 

By A. Goldberg. 



I have read with interest the article 
written by my old friend and country- 
man, Mr. Shacknoe, on the black Siber- 
ian hare. v 

Mr. Shacknoe claims Siberia as the 
habitat of the animal known in America 
as the Siberian hare; while in reality it 
is a rabbit (probably the Patagonian rab- 
bit) which was imported into Siberia 
some sixty years ago, and by human 
selection, taking advantage of the cold 
climate, it was changed and improved 
till it reached its present appearance. The 
slouchy and ugly ears dropping forward, 
over the eyes, would be straightened up 
by the coldness of the climate, as the ears 
of the lop-eared rabbit become straight- 
ened and erect when bred for three gen- 
erations in Siberia. 

When black or silver gray sports were 
produced, they were kept for breeding 
purposes, and as like begets like, the 
whole flock soon became either black or 
silver .gray. 

The desire to breed for these colors 
was actuated by the higher prices their 
owners would get for their pelts. They 
also breed from the largest animals as 
the flesh of this rabbit is delicious to eat 
and the owners wanted more of it. 

My theory is that the changes in the 
animal were made by human selection 
for personal gain, and it was not caused 
by the beautiful scientific natural selec- 
tion, aided by large birds of prey, as so 
profoundly described by Mr. Shacknoe in 
his article on the natural history ot the 
Siberian hare. The fact of the matter is 
that there is no rabbit indigenous to Si- 
beria and only three hares, all of which 
are gray in summer and white in winter. 
My grandfather, who was a careful 
and close observer of animals, remem- 
bered distinctly when the large Pata- 
gonian rabbit was first imported to Si- 



beria. He often explained to me the 
effect the cold climate had on the droop- 
ing ears, and the many other changes 
that took place from generation to gen- 
eration as years went on, and now, we 
find, Mr. Shacknoe writing it up as a 
native of Siberia and giving it the char- 
acter of a wild hare when it js really a 
tame rabbit, a few of which have been 
turned out to take care of themselves 
and have become semi-wild. 

Mr. Shacknoe gives a very interesting 
story of the way in which this rabbit 
prepares for her young, their customs 
and habits in a wild state. Why, this is 
not peculiar to the Siberian rabbit. Turn 
the Belgian hare or common rabbit out 
wild and they would act identically as 
Mr. Shacknoe describes this rabbit does. ' 

In conversation with a gentleman, who 
turned out a flock of Belgian hares on 
an island in Canada, this gentleman, who 
has read Mr. Shacknoe's account of the 
Siberian in its natural state, says it is 
identical as his rabbits acted, when turned 
wild on the island ; therefore, this is noth- 
ing new — but it is the nature of any rab- 
bit to act so when turned out wild. 

Now, in conclusion, may I say that I 
have no wish to injure the reputation of 
my countryman, or the business of those 
who have imported these rabbits to this 
country, but I write to correct the errors 
in Mr. Shacknoe's article. I have seen 
some of these rabbits in this country 
that were imported from Siberia and I 
consider them fairly good specimens and 
equal to those I have seen in my native 
country. I believe they are now superior 
to all other utility rabbits, as the fur is 
valuable as well as the flesh, but it must 
be remembered that their excellent qual- 
ities were obtained by breeding in Si- 
beria's cold climate for in this climate 
the fur will deteriorate equally as fast 
as it improved in Siberia. 





^6'- 



106 



THE GAME BREEDER 



FISH RAISING FOR THE AVERAGE FARMER. 



Since the time when primitive man 
first discovered the edible quality of fish, 
angling has been a favorite diversion. It 
has been a pastime in which men of 
wealth and those compelled to toil for a 
living have found equal pleasure and is 
pronounced by enthusiastic disciples of 
Isaak Walton to be the king of sports. 

So fascinating, indeed, has this pas- 
time been that men of wealth the world 
over have spent large sums of money in 
purchasing and stocking inland lakes and 
anglers of more modest means are ap- 
parently willing to undergo all sorts of 
inconveniences in order to spend a day 
with the line and rod. 

Both the State and the Federal Gov- 
ernments have been expending consider- 
able money in stocking inland lakes and 
rivers in order that angling may not be- 
come a pastime that may be indulged in 
by the rich only, and the Department of 
Commerce in a recent publication has 
added to tjie piscatorial literature a 
pamphlet setting forth explicit directions 
whereby almost every farmer may propa- 
gate fish at little expense. 

According to the pamphlet prepared by 
Robert S. Johnson and M. F. Stapleton 
of the Bureau of Fisheries, the propaga- 
tion of fish on farms in artificially con- 
structed ponds or in natural ponds of 
limited area is perfectly feasible, and 
with proper management such ponds will 
afford "a convenient and economical food 
supply that will justify the expense of 
their construction of preparation and 
maintenance. 

In calling attention to the possibility 
for farmers of the country to establish a 
readily accessible supply of fresh fish 
that may be drawn upon when desired 
the bureau emphasizes the fact that the 
natural and favorable water areas exist- 
ing on countless farms may be utilized 
for the purpose. Many of these water 
areas are now unsightly wastes, such as 
marshes and swamps that detract from 
the value of the land and serve no useful 
purpose. 

The authors assert that the presence 
of springs, lakes, flowing wells or ad- 



jacent streams are all leading incentives 
to a fishery project and suitable sites for 
the construction of ponds, especially if at 
present unremunerative, should make 
their use to such a purpose desirable to 
the thrifty husbandman after a full com- 
prehension of their possibilities in a fish- 
cultural way. 

Ponds intended for the cultivation of 
fish may be conveniently located for the 
watering of stock or the overflow there- 
from may be utilized for the irrigation 
of land. In many sections of the United 
States artificial ponds on farms are art 
absolute necessity to serve one or both 
of these latter purposes, and by a merely 
nominal expenditure such water areas 
may be advantageously utilized for the 
growing of fish without interfering in 
any way with the original uses for which 
they were intended. 

In a brood pond, says the bulletin, a 
constant water level should be main- 
tained at all times, especially during the 
'breeding season. The required flow, 
which will vary with the character of the 
soil, must be sufficient to replace loss 
by evaporation and seepage. An amount 
just short of overflowing the pond is the 
ideal to be attained, as it is desirable to 
avoid a current. 

For a one acre pond, where the sides 
and bottom are of clay or rich loam, a 
flow of from 30 to 50 gallons a minute 
should be sufficient to maintain a proper 
water level at all times, while sandy or 
gravel soil untreated may require double 
that amount. 

Springs are the most dependable of all 
sources of water supply requiring the 
minimum expenditure in preparation, and 
being the least subject to outside influ- 
ence. The presence of injurious mineral 
substances can usually be detected with- 
out expert analysis, but even pure water 
very frequently carries abnormal pro- 
portions of oxygen or nitrogen gases in 
quantities inimical to fish life. 

This abnormal condition of the water 
may be corrected by holding it for a time 
in a reservoir before letting it into the 
pond in which the fish are placed, and 



THE GAME BREEDER 



167 



where there is insufficient room for the 
construction of the reservoir a partial 
correction of the abnormal condition may 
be brought about by conducting the water 
into the fish pond through open ditches 
or raceways of wood or concrete. 

The chief objection to creek and river 
water as a supply for fish culture is the 
quantity of mud and debris carried dur- 
ing freshets and the excessive cost of 
effective measures to prevent its intro- 
duction into the ponds. Streams subject 
to an extremely high water period are 
totally impracticable as a source of sup- 
ply for artificial ponds. 

The water from these streams may be 
utilized, however, by conducting the 



water to ponds located some distance 
away, providing the intake is adequately 
screened, the supply arranged so that it 
can be cut off during times of excessive 
turbidity and measures taken to prevent 
the inundation of the pond site in high 
water periods. 

The source of water supply may also 
be taken from lakes, wells, or from so^ 
called sky-ponds which are dependent 
upon local precipitation for their supply 
of water. 

The exact mode of construction must 
depend largely upon local conditions, 
such as the presence or absence of favor- 
able land contour and the nature of the 
soil. — Providence Journal. 



HOW TO ORGANIZE A GAME BREEDING ASSOCIATION. 

Part II. 

By Dwight W. Huntington. 



The shooting rent, provided it be 10 
cents per acre, will amount to $64 per 
square mile per annum. I know many 
places where the rent paid is only 5 
cents per acre. 

A club of 25 members should have at 
least 1,200 or 1,500 acres and the shoot- 
ing rent therefore should be not over 
$120 or $150 per year. A club with 
small dues should not undertake any 
hand rearing. It should employ a beat- 
keeper for each 1,200 to 1,500 acres and 
see that he looks after the game breed- 
ing wild in every field. A few pheas- 
ants can be purchased in the fall and 
liberated for the shooting. Those not 
killed will probably nest wild if the ver- 
min be kept down and the food and 
covers be kept plentiful. 

Some of the inexpensive clubs employ 
a keeper to trap vermin and look after 
the game, -the wages being from $50 to 
$7? per month. At some clubs the 
keeper is only employed part of the 
time, but the shooting, of course, is not 
as good as it should be, excepting in a 
< favored Ibcalities where much game 
occurs in a wild state and where the 



vermin easily is controlled. Stock birds 
are usually purchased with money paid 
as initiation fees, which usually are 
equal to or larger than the annual dues. 

A club with 30 or 40 members and 
with annual dues at from $35 to $50 
per year easily can provide some ex- 
cellent quail and grouse shooting, and if 
a few wild turkeys be liberated in safe 
covers, some wild turkey shooting can be 
added for good measure. Some clubs 
have many members who shoot very lit- 
tle or not at all; the last named are 
termed "preferred stockholders," since 
they contribute to provide shooting for 
others. This is much better than con- 
tributing money to secure more laws pro- 
hibiting shooting. The preferred stock- 
holders should have a little game sent 
to them from time to time and it will 
be found not difficult to procure this 
class of members. 

The simplest and cheapest club can be 
well run with dues as low as $30 per 
annum, the members using a local hotel 
or farm-house for their quarters. By 
far the better plan, however, is to make 
the dues $50 and to see that the mem- 



108 THE GAME BREEDER 

bers get at least $-50 worth of meat, as Much depends upon the place selected 

they can if the club be properly man- for the shoot. Some places are suitable 

aged. A few pheasants can be pur- to game and easily can be made to yield 

chased in the fall to supplement the quail, abundantly. On some places the control 

grouse and rabbit shooting and some of f vermin is comparatively an easy mat- 

the game can be sold if it is deemed ter . In some places it is almost impos- 

advisable to reduce the amount of the sible to keep down the verm i n without 

" ues - - employing a number of keepers. Some 

The most inexpensive club should fields conta i n both natural foods and 

count on a yearly expenditure of at least covers . on vast areas such as the dosd 

$100 for the rent of the shooting and cu i t i va ted areas in the prairie States most 

I ! J°J a beat - k f e P er : A r sma11 amoun i of the fields are unsafe and uninhabit- 

should be expended also for gram and able because therg are nQ f oods Qr coyers 

other foods to be planted for the game at certain geasons of ^ In ^ 

^ i!?k W -?T tT' W1 ,°k where agriculture has waned and there 
should be provided. 1 know some clubs ° , , , , . . 
which have very fair shooting (with- are many abandoned farms the shoot- 
out fear of exterminating the game), ^g rent will be very small, but the cost 
whose annual expenses are not larger of kee P m S down the vermin will be 
than I have indicated. In some cases lar ^ er thai J rt , 1S m . P la( ; es where the 
small voluntary assessments or collec- lands are closel y cultivated, but m many 
tions of $5 or $10 are made to buy of the last named P la - Ces Jt wl11 be found 
some extra game. No hand-rearing of necessary to provide small covers -and 
pheasants or wild ducks should be under- special plantings of food- for the game, 
taken by clubs with small dues' unless Those in charge of the club should know 
the membership be larger and consider- what must be done and should see that 
able game is reared to be sold when shot, the game keeper does it. 



A REAL RABBIT DRIVE. 

By Warden J. W. Walden, La Grande, Oregon. 

Thinking that a description of our big lay low about 2,000 rabbits. Men on 

rabbit drive that took place on Sunday, horseback and with wagons followed to 

December 12, might be of some interest pick up the choicest victims. About 

to the readers of The Sportsmen, will 1 ,000 rabbits were brought back to North 

try and give a few details of same. Powder. 

The Wing, Fin and Fleetwood Gun At noon coffee, sandwiches, pies and 

Club of La Grande was invited by the other good things were served by the- 

North Powder Rod and Gun Club of North Powder Club. After the hunting 

North Powder, Oregon, to take part in was over, the hunters were entertained 

a big rabbit drive, which was pulled off at a fine banquet by the local club. This 

on the Telocaset plains. was an affair that will be long remem- 

About forty of the Wing, Fin and bered by all those who were fortunate 

Fleetwood Club were met at the train enough to be present at this banquet. 
by the North Powder Gun Club, and There were 800 rabbits sacked up by 

were immediately taken by teams to the the Wing, Fin and Fleetwood Club and 

Telocaset plains, where the hunters were shipped to La Grande and turned oyer 

placed in skirmish line, and the hunt to the Salvation Army, where distribution 

began. In all there were about 100 in took place. The finishing touch will be 

line and the constant rattle of shotguns on Wednesday night, December 22, when 

was not only deafening, but such as to the big annual "Hassenpfeffer" will be , 



THE GAME BREEDER 



109 



pulled off, with the Wing, Fin and Fleet- 
wood Club as hosts. 

I wish to say a few words in praise 
of the Wing, Fin and Fleetwood Club 
of La Grande. This club has about 200 
members, and every one of them is a 
live wire, standing strictly for the en- 
forcement of the game laws. They al- 
ways have their ear to the ground listen- 
ing for the footsteps of some game vio- 
lator. This club should be proud of the 
gentlemen they have selected as their 
officers, such as L. M. Hoyt, president; 
Pat Foley, vice-president ; A. A. Wentzel, 



secretary; C. R. Harding, treasurer. 
These gentlemen never shirk their duty, 
never say no to anything that is for the 
benefit of the conditions of the game and 
fish laws. They are always ready night 
and day to assist me as Deputy Game 
Warden of Union County in prosecuting 
any violator, whoever he may be. 

[There is a big demand for rabbits to re- 
stock the game farms and preserves in the 
Eastern States. We would suggest that the 
members of the Oregon Clubs write to the 
advertisers in The Game Breeder and offer 
them some rabbits in exchange for wild ducks 
and pheasants. — Editor.] 



GEORGE A. LAWYER, ADMINISTRATOR OF FEDERAL 

GAME LAWS. 

By David F. Lane. 



George A. Lawyer, a young attorney, 
a native and resident of Watertown, 
N. Y., was recently appointed to a po- 




George A. Lawyer. 



sition under the Department of Agri- 
culture, giving him charge of the ad- 
ministration of game laws throughout 



the United States, Alaska and the 
Hawaiian Islands, and he has already 
begun his duties in Washington. The 
position carries a salary of three thou- 
sand two hundred and fifty dollars and 
expenses, and while Mr. Lawyer will 
have to do with game preservation gen- 
erally, he will particularly look after the 
enforcement of the Federal Migratory 
Bird Law. So far as game is concerned, 
he will have charge of all of the na- 
tional parks and preserves in the country, 
and there are sixty or more game pre- 
serves in the United States in which ? 
kinds of animals, birds and fish are kept. 
During recent years there has been a 
great awakening among the sportsmen 
of the United States and movements have 
been started to stimulate game propaga- 
tion. At the same time the trend of 
action has been to secure the proper pro- 
tection. When the Federal Agricultural 
Department was granted the necessary 
appropriations by Congress in 1913, to 
enforce the Federal Migratory Bird Reg- 
ulations, which became effective in 1914, 
every State was back of the project, but 
since then there has been some dissatis- 
faction. However, sportsmen through- 
out the length and breadth of the land 
should now take courage, for the out- 
look for better game conditions under 
the Federal Migratory Bird Regulations 



no 



THE GAME BREEDER 



promises better conditions than ever ex- 
isted without it. 

Mr. Lawyer has always been a sports- 
man. He was born in Watertown Sep- 
tember 15, 1876, and it is related of him 
that when a small boy in knee trousers 
he frequently played hookey at school 
and betook himself to some quiet trout 
stream, with the appearance of the first 
Warm days of spring. When he got older 
he developed a desire for partridge hunt- 
ing. Since then he has never lost 'an 
opportunity to test his wits with the birds, 
the beasts and the fish. 

In 1894 Mr. Lawyer was graduated 
from the Watertown High School. On 
September 30, 1897, he was admitted to 
the bar and opened an office of his own, 
continuing the practice of law up to the 
present time. 

Realizing the necessity for some or- 
ganization for better protection of game 
propagation in Jefferson County, New 
York, in the fall of 1908, thirteen sports- 
men assembled in the office of Mr. Law- 
yer and organized the Jefferson County 
Sportmen's Association, choosing him as 
its first president. This position he held 
for four years, and during the first two 
the membership grew from thirteen to 
eight hundred. 

Four years ago, about the time that 
he relinquished the presidency of this 
association, he was chosen president of 
the New York State Fish, Game and 
Forest League, a state organization for 
the furthering of better game laws and 
game conditions. This position he also 
held for four years, refusing to accept 
it again at the annual election held a 
few months ago. 

As the head of the New York State 
Fish, Game and Forest League during 
the same year, Mr. Lawyer started a 
campaign for more game farms — there 
being but one in the state at that time — 
located at Sherburne. Governor Glynn 
granted him a conference, and at the 
head of a delegation of sportsmen, about 
two hundred and fifty strong, he went 
before the governor at the time appointed 
armed with a brief prepared in detail 
showing the amount paid to the State 
each year by hunters for licenses, and 
the small return that the State gave them 



for this revenue. He showed the corr • 
mercial and economic value of these 
farms to the hotels and railroads and 
made it plain that the sportsmen were 
going to begin a vigorous campaign to 
have the hunting license law repealed if 
something were not done. 

Four new game farms were asked. 
The governor promised that he would 
favor a bill that provided for two, on 
the understanding that no location in 
particular be specified. He agreed not 
to sign any bill of a local nature should 
one pass the legislature and be presented 
to him. The bill was prepared and $15,- 
000 each for two game farms appro- 
priated. One of these was established at 
Dexter, Jefferson County, and last year 
four thousand pheasants and twenty-five 
thousand pheasant eggs were distributed 
for propagation, while at Sherburne the 
number was five thousand birds and 
twenty-five thousand eggs. The second 
farm provided for in the bill has been 
established on Long Island, and this year 
it is expected that fifteen thousand birds 
and seventy-five thousand eggs (from all 
the farms) for stocking covers will be 
distributed. 

It was Mr. Lawyer that brought pheas- 
ants into northern New York, when he 
formed his county sportsmen's associa- 
tion, for until then these game birds 
were not known in that section of the 
State. Now there are fully ten thou- 
sand birds in the covers. At the begin- 
ning Mr. Lawyer raised many of these 
birds himself, and even now has a small 
number of fancy breeds. 

No man better qualified for the posi- 
tion to which he has just been appointed 
could have been chosen. 

Concerning the Federal Migratory 
Bird Law, of which he will have the 
administration, Mr. Lawyer has ideas 
which are sensible' and which will be so 
regarded by every sportsman in the 
country. He proposes to see that the 
law is enforced and the government pro- 
tected, but in the minds of those who 
know him there is no question but that 
the sportsmen as well as the government 
will be satisfied with him and his acts. 

Co-operation is the thing he proposes 
to strive for in carrying out his work. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



111 



and to get this, he will seek the con- 
fidence of the sportsmen of every state 
in the Union. That he is deserving of 
their confidence, the sportsmen will soon 
learn. 

In discussing game matters, Mr. Law- 
yer made it definite to the writer that 
he proposes to work with the States in 
protecting game, raher than against 
them. So far as climatic conditions will 
permit, there will be uniformity of reg- 
ulations. At present under the Federal 
Migratory Bird Law, the United States 
is divided into two zones — the breeding 
zone, which embraces the twenty-five 
states between the two oceans and north 
of the fortieth parallel of latitude and 
the Ohio River, and the wintering zone, 



which includes the twenty-three States 
below this line. 

Besides having charge of the adminis- 
tration of all of the game laws of the 
United States, Mr. Lawyer will look after 
the preparation of rules that fix the open 
and closed seasons. That he is fitted 
for the position is evidenced by the fact 
that it came to him unsought. He was 
highly recommended by Secretary of Ag- 
riculture David F. Houston, who con- 
sulted with several influential men before 
offering the appointment, and it is not 
unlikely that a good word was spoken 
for him by Secretary of State Robert 
Lansing, for Mr. Lawyer is a staunch 
Democrat and hails from Mr. Lansing's 
home city — and besides, Mr. Lansing is a 
sportsman. 



THREE IMPORTANT WILD DUCK FOODS. 

By W. L. McAtee. 

[The following is from an important bulletin issued by the Biological Survey, United 
States Department of Agriculture.J 



The vegetable food of wild ducks in- 
cludes a large variety of plants, of which 
three have been found of especial im- 
portance. These three are wild rice, wild 
celery and pondweeds. 

Wild celery beds and wild rice 
marshes have long been recognized as 
important features of ducking grounds. 
Less widely known, but not less impor- 
tant, are the submerged plants known as 
pondweeds. In the case of sixteen of 
the most important species of game 
ducks whose stomachs have been exam- 
ined, wild celery, wild rice and pond- 
weeds collectively compose 25.31 per 
cent, of the total food. The percentages 
of these foods consumed by the various 
species are given in the accompanying 
table. Too much reliance, however, 
should not be placed on these percent- 
ages, since the number of stomachs of 
some species is none too great, and ex- 
amination of a larger number may neces- 
sitate material changes in the figures. 

To many it may appear that the average 
percentages of wild rice and wild celery 



eaten by ducks are low, but it must be 
remembered that these foods are by no 
means universally distributed, nor are 
they accessible at all times of the year. 
Although on first thought a percentage 
of less than 5 for wild rice may seem 
small, it really means that these 16 
species of ducks get a twentieth of their 
annual subsistence from this grain ; in 
other words, the quantity they eat would 
support them for two and a half weeks 
if wild rice were fed upon exclusively. 
Similarly, wild celery, which forms 6.65 
per cent, of their food, would suffice 
for three and a half weeks, and pond- 
weeds which form 13.88 per cent., for 
more than seven weeks. 

The fact that wild celery and wild 
rice, although naturally of local and re- 
stricted distribution, may be grown in 
suitable places over the whole United 
States should be more widely known. 
There is no doubt that by transplanting 
and sowing the seeds of these and other 
plants used by ducks for food many de- 
pleted ducking grounds can be restored 



112 



THE GAME BREEDER 



and new grounds can be created. This 
means much in the effort to preserve our 
valuable wild ducks. In the present cir- 
cular it is proposed to give a brief state- 
ment of the value of the three plants 
as duck food, to show by means of de- 
scription and illustration how each may 
be recognized, and to explain where and 
how each may be propagated. 

Pondweeds. 

Referring to the tabulation of duck 
food (above), it will be seen that pond- 
weeds (Potamogeton) compose a greater 
percentage of the food of the 16 species 
there mentioned than wild rice and wild 



Thus it constitutes a slightly greater pro- 
portion of the subsistence of the bird 
than wild celery. The importance of this 
plant was pointed out several years ago 
by Mr. H. L. Skavlem, of Janesville, 
Wis., who found that at Lake Kosh- 
konong its tubers formed from 60 to 80 
per cent, of the canvasback's food. 

Besides the tubers on the roots, some 
pondweeds have winter buds among the 
leaves, and these, as well as the seeds, 
rootstocks, and indeed the whole plant, 
are eaten by ducks. As many as 350 
- tubers and no fewer than 560 seeds 
have been found in single stomachs. 
Pondweeds are really staple food for 



Percentages of the food of sixteen species of wild ducks provided by wild rice, zvild celery, and 

pondweeds. 



Common na)ne. 



Mallard 

Black duck 

Gadwall 

Baldpate.. 

Green-winged teal 

Blue-winged teal 

Shoveler 

PiDtail 

Wood duck 

Redhead 

Canvas back 

Scaup, or bluebill 

Lesser scaup, or bluebill.. 

Goldeneve 

Bufflehe'ad.... 

Ruddy duck 



Average. 



Scientific name. 



A nas platyrfiynehos 

Anas rubripes 

Chaulclasmus streperus . 

Mareca americana 

Nation carolinense 

Querquedula discors 

Spatula clypeata 

Dafila acuta 

Aixsponsa 

Mania americana 

Marila I'allisneria 

Marilamarila 

Marila affinis 

Clangulac. americana ... 

Charitonetta albeola 

Erismatura jamaicensis . 



Number 
of stom- 
achs ex- 
amined. 



209 
51 
37 
30 

120 
86 
49 
67 
75 
60 
60 
67 

126 
23 
36 
41 



Per cent of total contents composed of- 



Wild 
rice. 



17. 13 
12.05 



7.16 
4.56 
3.46 



4.95 
11.62 
4.41 
.33 
1.26 
7.49 



2.22 



Wild 
celery. 



2.48 
2.37 



10.00 
.69 
.20 



1.80 

3.17 

11.71 

23.71 

14.46 

17.53 

2.95 

5. 66 

9.54 



4.78 



6.65 



Pond- 
weeds. 



12. 07 
S.35 

17.64 

13. 71 
10.32 

9.83 

7.83 

13. 39 

0.72 

24.38 

42.35 

23.20 

8.18 

6. 50 

4.40 

12.50 



13.88 



Total of 
the three. 



32.28 
22.77 
17.04 
30.87 
15.57 
13.49 

7.83 
20.14 
21.51 
40.50 
60. 39 
38.92 
33.20 

9.51 
12. ,34 
22.10 



25. 31 



celery together. This is owing to the 
wider distribution of pondweeds, allow- 
ing ducks to feed on them in winter as 
well as during migration and in the breed- 
ing season. There are no fewer than 38 
species of pondweeds in the United 
States, of which at least 9 (figs. 9-17) 
are of practically universal distribution. 
One of the latter number, the fennel- 
leaved or sago pondweed (P. pectinatus, 
fig. 17), produces numerous tubers (fig. 
18) upon the rootstocks, which are 
eagerly sought by certain ducks. 

This one species makes up five-eighths 
of the whole amount of pondweeds eaten 
by the canvasback and more than a 
fourth of the entire food of the bird. 



ducks, and nothing is more common in 
the stomachs than the seeds of these 
plants. 

As mentioned above, there are many 
species of pondweeds, and they present 
quite a diversity of forms. Illustrations 
(figs. 9-17) of the 9 species of general 
distribution serve to show the general 
appearance of some of these plants. All 
Potamogetons are eaten by clucks, and 
any one of them would be a valuable 
acquisition for a ducking ground. 

The pondweed illustrated by figure 14- 
(Potamogeton perfoliatus) is known as 
redhead or duck grass, and is an impor- 
tant duck food, said to be especially at- 
tractive to redheads. We have found 



THE GAME BREEDER 



113 



more of it in the stomachs of canvas- rather long threadlike leaves, which pre- 
backs than of any other species. All sent a loose broomlike appearance in the 
told, 10 species of Potamogeton have been water. The plant is in some places 
identified from duck stomachs, including known as foxtail grass. It is known 

also as eelgrass, and apparently is the 
plant termed in Europe poker or poch- 




Fig. 9.— Potamogeton natans L. 



"■ ; ■: ^ ■; 




■ \}v slim/ 



"^s^-J 



Fig. 10 — Potamogeton lucens L. 

all but one of the 9 most widely rang- 
ing forms. (Figs. 9-17). 

Description of Pondweeds. 

The most important species, so far as 
known, is the sago pondweed (V.'pecti- 
natus). This plant has numerous 




w 



y V?' » 



Fig 11 — Potamogeton heterophyllus Schreb. 



<Sfi 



III I , * 






' \JW 



\W if/ ■ 

f 



I 3 





mm 



Fig 12— Potamogeton lonchites Tuckerm. 

ard grass, after a duck closely related 
to our redhead. In the autumn, sago 
pondweed bears small clusters of light 
brown seeds or nutlets near the surface 
of the water, in form somewhat like loose 
bunches of grapes. The other pond- 



lit 



THE GAME BREEDER 







■'vv\\\\\\v ' #7''^ 



V 



Fig. 13. — Potamogeton praelongus Wulf 

weeds bear seeds" in the same way, and 
vast numbers of them are eaten ^by 
ducks. 

The general appearance of sago pond- 
weed is well shown by figure 17; note 
the brush of fine threadlike leaves and 
the seed clusters as above described. 
Here also are shown the tender root- 
stocks with their tubers, delicacies much 
scught by many ducks. Figure 18 illus- 
trates the tubers enlarged. 

Distribution. 

The range of the sago pondweed is 





11 

l m- III 



mm 

■^ m m\ Mi 



w 




from coast to coast, and as far south 
as Florida,* Texas, the Mexican Pla- 
teau, and Lower California, and north to 
Nova Scotia, Hudson Bay and along the 
Pacific coast up to latitude 62° north 

Transplanting Pond weeds. 

Much less is known about the trans- 
planting of pondweeds than of wild rice 
and wild celery, but it is just as feas- 
ible, f The Fish Commission stations use 
pondweeds to some extent in their fish 
ponds, and no difficulty seems to be en- 
countered in transplanting them. Mr. 
Dwight Lydell, of the Michigan State fish 
hatchery, states that he has succeeded in 




®4 . !M /A \/ J 



J 



\ts ■x\fH&'.\ | I I'M 




Fig 1 5 —Potamogeton foliosus Raf 

propagating Potamogetons by means of 
seeds and of whole plants. He further 
states that the most successful and 
largest growths have been on bottoms 
where the mud is about 6 inches deep 
over sand or clay. By mowing the plants 



Fig-. 14 — Potamogeton perfoliatus L 



* The manuals of botany give the ran~e of 
this plant as south to Florida. We have been 
able to find definite records only as far as 
North Carolina. In our map (fig. 19) the 
northern limit of the plant is extended to Great 
Slave Lake, on the basis of the probable dis- 
tribution of an acquatic plant recorded from 
the Lewes River at 62° north latitude, and 
rear the mouth of the Severn River, Hudson 
Bay. 

f Since the above was written Mr. J. B. 
White, of Waterlily, N. C, has sold and trans- 
planted thousands of dollars' worth of sago — 
Editor. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



115 




.frig. 16. — Pctamo^et n pusi.lus L. 

in lakes where they are plentiful and 
scattering them about the ponds, no 
trouble has been experienced in getting 
a good crop Potamogetons. The writer 
is indebted to Mr. J. B. White, of 
Waterlily, N. C, for the information that 
he has often transplanted the sago pond- 
weed about Waterlily. Great success was 
had with some planted on St. Vincent 
Island, Fla. It has been propagated also 




at Janesville, Wis. Redhead grass (P. 
perfoliatus) also has been successfully 
propagated at St. Vincent Island, Fla. 

Those desiring to transplant pond- 
weeds must usually go out themselves 
to gather them, for the usefulness of 
the plants has not been sufficiently well 
known to create a trade in them.* The 
seeds of the various species ripen at dif- 
ferent times, but in the north may be 
looked for after August. Those of sago 
pondweed are in best condition in Sep- 
tember and October. After gathering 
they should be planted at once, or, if 
held, kept wet and in cold storage. 

How to Plant. — Pondweeds may be 
transplanted on a large scale, as noted 
above, by mowingf the whole plants with 
the seeds attached and scattering about 




Fig. '7- — Sago pondweed. (Reduced. From Sunset 
Magazine. February, 1905.) 



Fig id —Ti.be.-> of S-^o pt.iidweed.. 

where growth is desired. The seeds alone 
may be collected and sown broadcast, or 
they may be embedded in clay balls and 
distributed over the bottom. 

Where to Plant. — Most pondweeds re- 
quire fresh water, but a few species, in- 
cluding the sago pondweed, will grow in 
brackish or salt water. Mud bottom is 
preferable, but both sago pondweed and 
redhead grass will grow on sand. The 
water in which pondweeds are planted 
should be from 2 to 6 feet deep. 

When to Plant. — The seed may be 
planted in fall immediately after gather- 
ing, or if cold storage is available the 
seed may be held until spring, as de- 
scribed in the case of wild rice. 
(To be Continued.) 

*J. B. White, Waterlily, N. C, now deals 
largely in this plant and can supply it in large 
quantities. — Editor. 

fA description of the machine for mowing 
aquatic plants may he found in the Report of 
the U. S. Fish Com., 1892, pp. 477-478. 



116 



THE GAME BREEDER 




THE REMINGTON CELEBRATION. 



Millions of adult sportsmen the world over 
— and boys, perhaps, in particular, who are 
sons of farmers and of blacksmiths — are look- 
ing toward the Mohawk Valley this year with 
a special interest. At Ilion, N. Y., in that 
historic country of the Leather Stocking Tales, 
one hundred years ago, a boy of seventeen was 
working with his father in a little blacksmith 
shop on the family estate. In the boy's mind 
had long been growing a yearning for a rifle — 
the hills about his father's farm were alive 
with game. On this memorable morning in 
1816 the youth plucked up courage to ask his 
father for money to buy the coveted arm. 

All hail the courage of American boyhood 
— and the traditional conservatism of Ameri- 
can fathers ! 

For the boy's request was refused and right 
there was laid the foundation of Remington 
arms ! 

The boy was Eliphalet Remington, Jr. 

In August this year the people of Ilion vil- 
lage — now a community made up largely of 
skilled gunsmiths who treasure and are jealous 
of the Remington story, past and present— will 
celebrate the making of the first Remington 
rifle which the boy Remington started im- 
mediately upon his father's refusal. 

TOLD FROM FATHER TO SON. 

It is familiar history in the valley — told and 
retold from father to son by many a fireside — 
how young Remington picked up scrap iron 
here and there, how by infinite labor he ham- 
mered it into a billet on the smithy anvil, how 
he carried the bar fifteen miles to Utica to 
have it bored and rifled, and how he finally 
assembled the complete rifle. It was a well 
made rifle and there was a demand for more- 
first among neighbors, then the people of the 
adjoining counties looked to Ilion for their 
hunting weapons. Day by day the Remington 
fame spread until the state and the nation, 
and finally the whole wide world found the 
path to the always growing factories for 
which this farmer-smithy boy genius laid the 



foundation. Today more than 25,000 workers 
are making firearms and ammunition which 
go forth under the Remington name. 

So the citizens of Ilion — and Ilion has 
grown in these hundred years from a cross 
roads to a thriving town of 10,000 people — 
have long planned this celebration. There will 
be a great pilgrimage to the scenes of the 
early Remington activities. The forge has 
long since gone — crumbled and rotted and 
washed away by the years — but on the site, 
well marked by generations of dwellers in the 
valley, a commemorative tablet will be placed. 
And in the village, in the shadow of one of 
the gigantic Remington arms factories, there 
will be parades and pageants, speeches and 
spectacles, games and various other forms of 
entertainment, all to bring back to the present 
generation a glimpse of the progress of one 
hundred years and to emphasize the old adage, 
"Despise not the day of small things.". 

THREE DAYS' CELEBRATION. 

Three days, August 29, 30 and 31, are an- 
nounced as the celebration days by the Ilion 
Centennial Committee. These will be desig- 
nated, respectively, as Ilion Day, New York 
State Day and Industrial Day. Appropriate 
programs have been tentatively arranged and 
details are being carefully and elaborately 
worked out — Ilion has an enviable reputation 
for doing things on a big scale. So far, it is 
known that Governor Whitman of New York 
State will be among the speakers. Other rep- 
resentative men will also talk to the great 
crowds that Ilion will entertain. Major Gen- 
eral Hugh L. Scott, Chi&f of Staff, United 
States Army, will be in attendance on one day 
at least. 

Just now— two months distant from the 
celebration time — the event is forecasted in 
many ways. For instance, in a McDougal 
Alley studio, ' New York, just on the edge of 
Washington Square, Albin Polasek, the Bo- 
hemian sculptor, is creating, in clay, his con- 
cep'ion of the making of the first Remington — 



THE GAME BREEDER 



117 



a striking conception that is splendid in spirit 
and in execution. From Mr. Polasek's model, 
bronze statues will be made and presented by 
the citizens of Ilion "To the Organized Militia 
of the United States, for Perpetual Competi- 
tion." These statues will be sent to the na- 
tional capitols of each State and will be com- 
peted for each year by the National Guard 
companies and awarded "for proficiency in 
marksmanship." The model may also be re- 
produced in other ways. It is safe to say that 
no more fitting and graceful tribute has ever 
been paid the shooting sport in this country 
than the giving of these statues. 

AN UNPARALLELED ACHIEVEMENT. 

Probably nowhere in the world — certainly 



not in this young country of ours — has there 
been a parallel to this solid century of achieve- 
ment and advancement along one line of in- 
dustry, going back for its origin to so humble 
and yet so romantic a beginning. From the 
little forge shop to the largest manufacturers 
of firearms and ammunition in the world in 
the span of a human life,, is a development 
that seems more like a dream than the mag- 
nificent record which history shows it to be. 

The rallying of the throngs and the home- 
comings to the prosperous little Mohawk Val- 
ley town in August will represent only a small 
cross section of- the Centennial's full meaning. 
All the world will pay homage to Ilion this 
year and to the birth and growth of the fire- 
arms industry in America. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 

at. Two hours after the English spar- 
row was gone. I called my cocker span- 
iel to find it. He located it in a hole of 
the wall and took it from the mouth of 
a large garter snake "which had already- 
got the head and shoulders down. I 
am satisfied this snake would kill and eat 
any young bird like a quail, for exam- 
ple. 

A club of which I am president, lo- 
cated in North Carolina, gives the game 
warden a 25 cent bounty for every egg- 
devouring snake he kills, also for every 
hawk known as an enemy to birds. In 
bounties he has collected from year to 
year about $60 per annum. We formerly 
included owls but we omitted them as 
they are great destroyers of field mice, 
the farmers asking for the owls' protec- 
tion even if they did get some quail. 

The tail of every snake killed is tacked 
on the side of a barn for my annual in- 
spection and count. I find there from 
100 to 150 each year, the list being 
mostly black and whip snakes and a few 
land moccasins. Our game warden is 
a strictly honest man. He has seen large 
black snakes rob hen's roosts and tells 
me that in Florida the "racer," or large 
black snake, after swallowing whole, sev- 
eral eggs, finds a narrow space to crawl 
through and in so doing constricts and 
breaks up the eggs in his stomach. I 
am sure any snake from 2^2 feet up- 
wards will eat any egg in size up to and 
including a grouse egg. 

J. D. Foot. 




Young Mallards. 

More About Snakes. 

Referring to "snakes" — years ago a 
black snake was opened on the B. G. 
Park Association grounds and six part- 
ridge (grouse) eggs were taken from 
his stomach. I have an original set of 
Audubon's works. One plate shows a 
combat between a black snake and the 
parent brown thrasher, one of which he 
has killed. He was trying to take the 
eggs from their nest and Audubon wit- 
witnessed the scene. 

Last spring I shot a sparrow that was 
annoying my martins and laid it on the 
wall below their house for them to look 



118 THE GAME BREEDER 

Food for Wild Ducks. am always indignant when I hear of more 

Mr. Jasper B. White soon will make or less slaughter of this kind. What will 

an extended trip to visit old customers our fields and woods look like if grace- 

who have planted his sago pond weed and fully soaring hawks are forever elimi- 

other foods and to see many new ones nated from the view and if the land and 

who wish his advice about planting, its crops are throughout the day given 

Readers who wish to procure sago, celery over to rodent pests ? 
or other duck foods are advised to write I" comments upon the same State's 

to Mr. J. B. White, Waterlilly, N. C. game laws appears the statement that it 

He has many testimonials from people is against the law to kill or injure foxes 

who have planted his foods. Mr. White in Ohio. Verily, here is a puzzle. Is 

expects to visit The Game Breeder befon there any wild fox that does not destroy 

long when local customers will have an more birds; more four footed game ani- 

opportunity of conferring with him. Let- uials and more chickens than a hawk ? 

ters addressed to Mr. White, care of Does the rather small value of his pelt 

The Game Breeder, will be forwarded repay the depredation of years? 
promptly while he is on his Northern These things may become live issues 

trip. in other States and it is well to carefully 

. _, , 7~* 7" __ , consider them from all sides before it is. 

A State s Attack on Hawks. too i ate .— Guide to Nature. 
Joseph W. Lippincott. . 

The Hawk Bounty Law in Ohio' has Ants and Ant Eggs. 

according to Assistant Inspector Major ne of our readers writes to say that 

Charles Becht s estimate led to the kill- he can ther lent of ant but he 

mg of 10,000 birds in that State since also thers the ants with the and 

last June. The killing is still going on, he wishes to know how tQ separate them ^ 

the bounty paid being one dollar per We referred the quest ion to one of the 

hawk— a high reward to put upon the best ke in the count and he 

heads of birds which other States find Hed that he purchased his alrt eggs 

the average gunner only too prone to from The s tts p atent Ltd Newark 

shoot without such incentive and even New j and was unable tQ solye the 

the sanction of the law. problem. We would like to hear from 

Many of us know the great good cer- the s ^ iW th can soWe the 

tain hawks do in killing off numbers of riddle and Jt be th would bke to 

destructive little rodents whose ranks if have some of the abundant eggs after the 

unrestrained can increase five to six fold ants are eliminated. 

in a year or even less time. 1 hat thou- 

sands of valuable hawks must perish an 

be thus lost to communities as mousers The Egg Market. 
and insect destroyers in order that a few Breeders are sending reports of the 
rascals in their ranks may pay the just number of eggs sold and the prices real- 
penalty of misdeeds seems to me a great ized this season. Those who advertised 
pity. early and persistently say they are well 
We may all unite in condemning four pleased with the results. One (who says 
kinds of hawks, for they are proved to this letter is not for publication since 
be enemies of other birds and therefore we remember the old adage, "Fools' 
also of men — they are the sharpshin, the names like fools' faces are always seen 
goshawk, the cooper and the peregrin in public places") writes that he sold 
falcon, commonly called the duck hawk all of his pheasant eggs, between one 
because of its predisposition to kill wild and two thousand, at $25 per hundred, 
ducks. To such a black list one might Pheasants were sold at $5 each as the 
also add that big night marauder, the breeding season approached and he could 
great horned owl. It is an easy matter not fill his orders. Quail sold for $36 
to find in any library pictures of these per dozen and later he says he was of- 
destroyers in order to distinguish them, fered $60 per dozen for these birds and 
As a farmer as well as a bird lover I could not supply them. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



119 



Now is the Time. 

We would strongly urge those who 
expect to purchase game birds or eggs 
for next season to write to our adver- 
tisers now and get prices for birds to be 
delivered in the fall and for eggs to be 
delivered early in the spring. 

Many States have enacted game breed- 
ers' laws. Many clubs and individuals 
will buy game and eggs. The prices 
surely will advance rapidly as the breed- 
ing season approaches and we are con- 
fident the demand will exceed the supply 
and that those who do< not arrange to get 
game and eggs early will be disappointed 
to learn that the dealers cannot fill their 
orders. 

Clubs should buy enough birds to be 
able to sell some eggs to help pay their 
expenses. 

Remember that the New York market 
is now open to game produced by indus- 
try in other States and that there will be 
a big demand for the desirable food. 



farm. There were twelve of them when 
they were liberated by the Brownsville 
Rod and Gun Club. — Oregon Sportsman. 



Pheasants. 



Own Dogs Broke His Leg. 

Russell, Kan. — F. J. Wilson got a 
leg broken in a peculiar manner the 
other Sunday. He was out in the fields 
looking at his crops when his greyhounds 
started after a jack rabbit. As the dogs, 
following the rabbit in close pursuit, 
came by Mr. Wilson they ran against 
him, breaking his leg just below the 
knee. — The World. 



Bob White Quail Plentiful. 

By Warren S. B. Tycer, 
Brownsville, Oregon. 

A few lines from Linn County, the 
original home of the famous Chinese 
pheasant, might prove of interest to read- 
ers of The Oregon Sportsman. At the 
close of the shooting season last fall there 
appeared to be left more pheasants in the 
fields than has ever been known before. 

Bobwhite quail are becoming very plen- 
tiful in Linn County, especially in the 
eastern portions. The California quail, 
liberated in the neighborhood of Browns- 
ville last year, are doing well. It is re- 
ported that about fifty of these birds 
were seen recently on the Montgomery 



Mr. S. V. Reeves has sent us a little 
book, "Rearing Pheasants in Small En- 
closures," a guide to those rearing and 
keeping pheasants. 

Mr. Reeves says there is nothing stated 
in the booklet that has not been long and 
successfully tried by the author. The 
book is illustrated with drawings of pens, 
coops and runs and contains simple di- 
rections for handling the birds and eggs 
and the bantams which the author pre- 
fers for foster mothers. There are direc- 
tions for feeding the old and young 
pheasants. The book is published by the 
author, S. V. Reeves, Haddonfield, New 
Jersey. Price 20 cents. 



The Crow Call. 

Many people believe that the crow is 
one of the worst enemies of game as 
well as poultry. We have had consider- 
able experience with crows and know 
that they are fond of game eggs and 
young game birds. We are glad to in- 
vite our readers' attention to a small 
advertisement of a crow call which is 
highly recommended and is said to be 
very fatal to crows. It is inexpensive 
and we advise those who have game to 
try the crow call and to shoot some of 
the black enemies. 

Backbone. 

The teacher of a small class of chil- 
dren recently gave a physiology lesson 
on the bones of the body. The time to 
ask questions had come. 

"Who will tell me what the backbone 
is?" 

The question was a poser, and no one 
ventured to reply. Finally the teacher 
detected a gleam of hope in Sammy's 
face and smiled encouragingly at him. 

"Well, Sammy?" 

"The backbone is a long straight bone. 
Your head sits on one end and you sit 
on the other," answered Sammy. 






120 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T^ e Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, JULY, 1916. 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, f 1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer,. 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



THE IMPORTANT SAGO. 

When the editor of The Game Breeder 
was engaged in writing the book about 
wild duck breeding, "Our Wild Fowl 
and Waders," he asked a distinguished 
ornithologist to write a chapter about the 
natural foods of wild ducks. The re- 
quest was declined for the reason given 
that the naturalist did not feel qualified 
to handle the subject. He added that 
he had doubts if anyone in America was 
equipped to fill the order for a compre- 
hensive chapter on wild duck foods. 

Mr. Jasper B. White, of Waterlilly, 
North Carolina, and Mr. Clyde B. Ter- 
rell, of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, had begun 
to sell wild celery and wild rice, and the 
late Dr. R. V. Pierce, the owner of the 
big preserve, St. Vincents Island, Flor- 
ida, had introduced the fox-tail grass or 
sago pond weed with great success and 
wrote a letter to the editor about this 
food which was quoted at length in the 
book. 

The year after the publication of the 
book, Mr. W. L, McAtee, of the Biolog- 
ical Survey, U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, wrote the excellent bulletin on 
"Three Important Wild Duck Foods," a 
part of which relating to the sago and 
other pond weeds is printed on-another 
page. It appears that sago and the 
others compose a greater percentage of 
the food of sixteen of the most important 
species of ducks than wild rice and wild 
celery together. 



Mr. McAtee says he is indebted to Mr. 
J. B. White, of Waterlilly, N. C, for the 
information that he has often trans- 
planted the sago pond weed about Water- 
lilly. Dr. Pierce informed the editor that 
he procured his sago from Mr. White. 
In his letter, quoted in the book, he said : 
"My lakes and ponds are now quite well 
seeded with this plant. I regard the 
foxtail grass (sago) as one of the most 
valuable duck foods because it seeds pro- 
lificacy and, also, produces bulbs which 
are much sought after by many species 
of ducks ; in fact, by all species and also 
by wild geese. Foxtail grass spreads very 
rapidly. When once produced in a duck 
preserve, one need have no fear of its 
ever running out or failing to grow 
abundantly." 

When Mr. McAtee wrote his import- 
ant bulletin he observed that "those de- 
siring to transplant pond weeds must 
usually go out themselves to gather them, 
for the usefulness of the plants has not 
been sufficiently well known to create a 
trade in them. All this has been changed 
rapidly since Dr. Pierce praised sago in 
the book, "Our Wild Fowl and Waders," 
and Mr. McAtee pointed out its import- 
ance in the bulletin. Thousands of dol- 
lars worth of sago have been sold to the 
owners of duck preserves within the past 
few months and the demand for this im- 
portant food steadily is increasing. Mr. 
Jasper B. White, who began with a few 
lines of advertising in The Game Breeder 
increased the space to a quarter page and 
in this issue has a full page devoted to 
the offering of sago and other important 
wild duck foods. 

Mr. McAtee performed a great public 
service when he wrote the bulletin about 
the sago pond weeds, the wild celery and 
the other plants which are eaten by wild 
fowl. 



IOWA. 






Mr. E. C. Hinshaw, the State Fish and 
Game Warden of Iowa, is entitled to 
great credit for the advanced position the 
State has taken in the matter of conserv- 
ing its game. Iowa once had an abund- 
ance of prairie grouse, quail, wild fowl 
and other game and- many residents of 
the State can recall the time when they 
could have game to eat. In no State 



THE GAME BREEDER 



121 



has it been more evident that the enact- 
ment of many game laws did not pro- 
duce the desirable food for the people to 
eat; in no State are the possibilities for 
excellent shooting better than they are 
in Iowa. The farms of Iowa can be 
made to yield grouse and quail abund- 
antly provided the sportsmen and farmers 
work harmoniously and the conditions 
under which game can exist be restored. 
Prairie grouse cannot survive on closely 
cultivated areas where their winter foods 
are destroyed and where a little shooting 
is added to the destruction of the birds 
by their natural enemies. The farms in 
Iowa easily can be made to yield an 
abundance of game for the people to eat 
and for the sportsmen to shoot provided 
small covers and food areas can be main- 
tained and provided the natural enemies 
of the game be controlled to make a 
place for the shooting. A profitable 
game farm in every county would soon 
make the game plentiful and cheap in 
the markets. The sportsmen of all 
classes will be benefited when some of 
them create a game preserve since the 
game will overflow as it does in other 
States from the game preserve. 

; — ♦ 

CORRESPONDENCE. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

Here's my renewal. Keep up your 
. good work. Would not miss a copy of 
your magazine. 

Wisconsin. E. G. Showers. 



It Pays to Subscribe. 

A man in Sherman County, Oregon, 
subscribed for The Oregon Sportsman, 
went home and told his wife what he 
had done. She was so pleased with his 
sportsmanship that- on the following day 
she presented him with a ten pound boy 
Possibly there would have been twins had 
he also subscribed for The Game 

Breeder. 

• 

Ex Post Facto Towel Law. 

The roller towel has been rather gen- 
erally killed off and forgotten in Massa- 
chusetts public places, but it lingershere 
and there in remote spots. A Boston 
man just back from a business trip 
through* some of the small places of 



Western Massachusetts tells of finding 
one of the things in the washroom of a 
country hotel. 

"Say," he said to a companion washer, 
a native, "doesn't the man that runs this 
hotel know that the roller towel is 
against the law?" 

"Sure, he knows it," answered the 
native, as he combed his spare locks with 
the chained comb hanging from the wall, 
"but that law wasn't passed when this 
towel was put up." 

Quick Returns. 

A Scotchman was telling an Irish 
neighbor of his with great pride how he 
had planted an acorn which sprang up 
into a fine oak tree. 

"Begorra, that's nothing," commented 
Pat, unimpressed. "Sure an' I once 
planted a dead cat, and in a short time 
up sprang a sanitary inspector." 

_ * 

Rebuffed. 

In the early morn the fresh city 
boarder met the rustic dairymaid carry- 
ing a couple of foaming milk pails. 

"Ah, good morning, my dear," he 
said, patronizingly. "How is the milk- 
maid?" 

" 'Tain't made at all, kind sir," she 
said. "We take it from th' cows." — 
Chicago Herald. 

— • 

A Healthy Disease. 

Laziness is a disease, declares one of 
the eminent doctors. The surprising 
fact is that most of the victims of the 
disease always look so distressingly 
healthy.— Providence Journal. 

A Good War Horse. 

A professor who had bought a shabby 
looking horse asked his coachman to try 
it. After the animal had been trotted 
around the road a few times the pro- 
fessor asked Pat : 

"What do you think of him?" 
"Be dad, he'd make a fine war horse," 
said Pat. 

. "Why, how is that?" asked the pro- 
fessor. • 

" "Because," said Pat, "he'd sooner die 
than run." 



122 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Champion 

Mississippi Sport 

at Stud, Fee $30,09 

Breed to a real bird dog with 
brains, ambition and the best of 
blood lines. 

R. H. SIDWAY 

147-153 W. Mohawk Street 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



Jg^ 


BOOK ON 


/ffife^ 


DOG DISEASES 


•psf^ 


And How to Feed 


America's 

Pioneer 

Dog Remedies 


Mailed free to any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Inc. 
118 West 31st Street, New York 




The Best in 
Pointers 

Puppies, Broken Dogs 

and Brood Bitches, by 

Champion Comanche 

Frank, Fishel's Frank 

and Champion Nicholas 

R. 

Write me your wants, please. 

U. R. FISHEL 
Box 35 HOPE, IND. 



The Amateur Trainer 

By Ed. F. Haberlein 

A practical trainer of over 30 years' experience, whose 
system is up to date and stands unequaled. 

New Edition Just Oat. Illustrated. 
A plain, practical and concise, yet thorough guide 
in the art of training, handling and the correcting 
of faults of the bird doz subservient to the gun 
afield. Written especially for the novice, but 
equally valuable to the experienced handler. By 
following the instructions plainly given, every 
shooter possessed of a little common sense and 
patience can train his own dogs to perfection. 
Paper cover, $1.00; best full cloth binding and gold 
embossed, $1.50. Address 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 



Membership in Private Hunting and Fishing Preserve 

The Longwood Valley Sportsmen's Club, Controlling the Fishing and 
Hunting Preserve of the late U. S. Senator John Kean in Upper Longwood 
Valley, Northern New Jersey, invites inquiries from Sportsmen for Mem- 
bership, which is both limited and exclusive. Deer, Pheasants, Quail, 
Partridge Abundant; also Brook, Rainbow and Brown Trout, Large and 
Small Mouth Bass in Lakes and Streams. Two hours by auto from New 
York. 
Address LONGWOOD VALLEY SPORTSMEN'S CLUB, care The Game Breeder, 

150 Nassau Street, New York City 



THE GAME BREEDER 



123 




SPORTMANS HANDBOOK 

WRITE Pprr POSTAGE 
T TODAY IVLL PREPAID 



POSTAGE 
PREPAID 



The 4th Edition of my Sportsman's Handbook is 
ready and I want to send a copy to every man or 
woman who 'loves the woods, the fields and the inland 
waters. It is the most complete and interesting 

Sportsman's Handbook and Catalog 

I have ever written. It not only illustrates and describes 
hundreds of articles for the Camper, Fisherman, Hunter and 
Explorer, but tells of my experience in the wilds of the 
United States, Canada and Mexico. There are pictures of 
wild animals and game birds, and advice as to selection of 
duffle, pitching a tent, caring for firearms, preparing skins 
for the taxidermist, etc., etc. There are chapters on how, 
when and where to Camp, Fish and Hunt, and many "kinks" 
in wildcraft. 

I will send this book free if you mention No. 266. 

If you are interested in outdoor or indoor games, such as Baseball^ Tennis, 
Golf, Archery, Swimming, Basketball, Boxing, etc., 



265. 



let me send you Book No. 
POWHATAN ROBINSON, President. 



NEW YORK SPORTING GOODS CO. 



»& 



1 5 and 17 Warren Street, New York 



r'ork, U. S. A. ■ 



Only Two Essentials Lacking. 

Sidney Hocks is fixing to open a bar- 
ber shop at Bounding Billows. He ex- 
pects to be ready for business as soon 
as he can get hold of a good razor and 
a back number of the Police Gazette. — 
Hogwallow Kentuckian. 



Inside Information. 

Willie — Paw, what is meant by inside 
information? 

Paw — That's something that a surgeon 
has after he gets through with a man in 
the operating room, my son.— Cincinnati 

Enquirer. 

♦ 

Where Harrison Studied. 

The Society for the Preservation of 
Virginia Antiquities has been placing 
tablets on various sites throughout the 
city of Richmond, commemorating their 
past associations with greatness. 

One of these tablets is on an Italian 
public house or barroom, in Eighteenth 
street, and it reads: 

"William Henry Harrison, ninth presi- 
dent of the United States, studied med- 
icine here." 



\\T RITE US for Prices 
on ringnecks deliver- 
able in July, August or 
September as you may 
desire, also Mallard. We 
handle sixteen other varie- 
ties of pheasants, all varie- 
ties peafowl, wild turkey 
and fancy ducks. 

Send 30 cents stamps 
for colortype catalogue. 



CHILES & CO. 

Mount Sterling. Kentucky 



124 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



LIVE GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE PHOENIX FOWL 
Eggs lor sale; several varieties. S. V. REEVES. 114 
E. Park Ave., Haddonfield, N. J. 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country. Black and White 
Swans. Wild Ducks, etc., for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (ioti 

FOR SALE BUFFALO AND ELK IN CAR LOAD 
lots or single. Deer, Antelope, Beaver. Mink, Mountain 
Lion, Pheasants and Game Birds. Eggs in season. 
KENDRICK PHEASANTRIES, Coronado Building, 
Denver, Colorado. 7-/6 

GOLDEN AND ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANT 

eggs for hatching. May to August. W S~. ALLISON, 

Merrimacport, Mass. y-ib 

PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW- 
ing prices: Mallards. $3.00 per pair. Pintails, $2.50 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $4.00 per pair. Blue Wirg Teal, 
$300 per pair. Also redheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for propa- 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN, 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 

GOLDEN PHEASANTS— $10.00 A PAIR. EGGS.30C 

each. FRAN KLIN J. PITTS, 14 Websier St.. Taunton, 

Mass. 7.76 



SAN LORENZO GAME FARM — BREEDER OF 
all kinds of pheasants ; eggs in season ; also birds 
for sale at all times Visitors welcome. Write for 
price list. Mrs. S. MATTHIESSEN, San Lorenzo, 
Alameda Co., California. 7-ib 



CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATED PHEASANT BREED- 
ERS. Pheasants. Quail, Mallard price list. FRED D. 
HOYT, Hayward, Cal. 



GAME EGGS 



FIRST PRIZE WINNING RINGNECK PHEASANTS. 
Place your orders for stock and eggs now, also several 
varieties of bantams and hares. Prices reasonable. 
CHAS. G. BOLTON, Zieglerville, Penn. 



PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE: STRICTLY FRESH 
and fertile. I am now booking orders for spring and 
summer. Amherst, Golden, Silver. GRAY PHEAS- 
ANTRIES, Ward Street, Orange, New Jersey. 

MALLARD EGGS. FROM SELECT WINNERS, 
$3.50 per 13, $25.00 per hundred ; from utility stock, $2 00 
per 13, $15.00 per hundred. Early eggs bring better re- 
sults Enter order now. CLYDE B; TERRELL, Natur- 
alist. Dept. P2. Oshkosh, Wis. 



GAME BIRDS WANTED 



WANTED— MONGOLIAN AND RINGNECK PHEAS- 
ANTS and deer for breeding. Also cub bear. Give 
description and prices. CLARE WILLARD, Allegany. 
New York. 



WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX. 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants. Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt Sterling, Ky. 

DEER WANTED -Wanted, one pair of adult fallow deer. 
State price. A C C, care of The Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



GAMEKEEPERS 



SITUATION WANTED— HEAD GAMEKEEPER OR 

Superintendent of large estate or game preserve. Very 
capable man to show sport. Thoroughly experienced 
rearing pheasants, partridge, quail and wild ducks. 
Management of incubators hatching pheasant and duck 
eggs. Also breeding, training and handling high class 
shooting dogs. Excellent trapper, competent manager. 
Reference present employer. GAMEKEEPER, 157 East 
69th St., New York. 

GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION. UNDER- 
stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 
this country. Address M. F., care of The Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau Street, New York. 



WANTED— SITUATION 
As Superintendent or Manager on a game farm or 
preserve. Experienced in game and poultry breeding. 
Good reason for desiring change of location. Would 
take an interest in a game farm to breed game com- 
mercially. Address C. McM., office of The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York City. 



REAL ESTATE 



GAME BREEDING FARM WANTED 
Wanted to purchase or rent a small place in one 
of the Eastern States where game breeding is legal. 
A small farm with a pond and stream is desired. 
State price and location. M. A. C, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game 



THE GAME BREEDER 



®/2$' 



BUNGALOW FOR SALE OR RENT 

HAVE WELL BUILT BUNGALOW IV THE MOUN- 
tainsof Ulster Co., N.Y., 2 hours from N.Y. City and half- 
hour from Poughkeepsie. Bungalow contains 6 rooms, 
good artesian well and first-class outbuildings. Will rent 
furnished or unfurnished for the comingsummer. Address 
E. DAYTON, 26 Bergen Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 



FOODS 



WILD DUCKS* NATURAL FOODS Will attraet 
them. These foods collected, examinations made, plant- 
ings planned and superintended. Write for free infor- 
mation. CLYDE B TERRELL, Specialist on the Natural 
Foods of Wild Ducks, Dept. Pi, Oshkosh, Wis 

MEAL WORMS FOR BIRDS, FOR SALE BY THE 
hundred or in large quantities. 25c. per hundred. Write 
for prices for larger lots. WM. STOFKREGN, 124-126 
4th Ave., New York City. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



REARING PHEASANTS IN SMALL ENCLOSURES 
Price, 20 Cents. It contains nothing that has not been 
thoroughly and successfully tried out in actual practice 
S. V. REEVES, Haddonfield, N. J. 



SEND 25 CENTS FOR INFORMATION AND PRICE 
list of the most profitable furbearing animal, the Black 
Siberian Hare. SIBERIAN HARE CO., Hamilton, 
Canada. 

AIREDALE PUPPIES, BEST BREEDING, MANY 
champions in pedigree. Also Golden Pheasant Eggs. 
MRS. A. E. THOMPSON, Williamsburg, Va. 

WANTED—BIRD DOGS FOR TRAINING. TWENTY- 
seven years' experience in training.Grouse Dogs. Good 
references. Terms reasonable, satisfaction guaranteed. 
A. E SEIDEL, Danville, Pa. 



ORDER NOW FOR FALL DELIVERY, 5 VARIETIES 
of Pheasants, Wild Mallards, Fancy Ducks, Wild Geese, 
Quail ; 14 varieties of Standard Poultry, including Turkeys. 
Stamp for inquiry. TOLLAND FISH & GAME ASS'N, 
Riverton, Conn. 

EVERY SPORTSMAN 
should help to kill off our worst game enemy. A Crow 
Call will help you get some excellent shots and do worlds of 
good. Price 65c. A. V. LINDQUIST, Alexandria, Minn. 



CALIFORNIA VALLEY QUAIL IN EXCHANGE FOR 
Bob -whites, bird for bird. Eggs for sale- Ring Neck 
Pheasants, $2 50 per 15. Quail, $2.00 per 15. Eggs shipped 
on receipt of price Fertility guaranteed. Address 
JOSEPH KETCHUM, 309 17th Street, Pacific Grove, Calif. 



DOGS 



NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
English bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds, American fox- 
hounds* lion, cat, deer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. All 
trained. Shipped on trial. Satisfacfion guaranteed or 
money refunded Purchaser to decide. Fifty page highly 
illustrated catalogue, 5c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 



THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
otter for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 



GENUINE BLACK SILVER FOX PUPS FOR SALE. 
We board your foxes, guarantee them, or build your 
ranch for yau. For information write New Hampshire 
McNeill Black Silver Fox Co., or R J. McNeill, PENA- 
COOK, New Hampshire. 



Ulk 




^- 

INDEPENDENCE, KflNSflST 




A SPEEDY RELIEF TO HAY-FEVER SUFFERERS 



The Farmer's Attitude. 
Rural New Yorker says : 

There are two bills before the New York 
Legislature which make changes in the game 
laws. One changes the open season for pheas- 
ants to the first three Thursdays in Novem- 
ber. At this season, stock and workmen are 
to a large extent out of the fields — thus giv- 
ing less danger from injury. The other pro- 
hibits hunting within 200 feet of a farm build- 
ing or. shooting within 500 feet of buildings or 
highway. This will be called a very mild form 
of , prohibition to one who has been obliged 



to pick shot out of his body or see his stock 
maimed or killed, but we should all get behind 
these bills and help put them through. There 
is now an organized movement to protect 
farmers' rights in these game laws. It is 
backed by the State Grange, Horticultural So- 
ciety and many other organizations. James 
G. Greene of Rochester is in charge of this 
legislation, and he will need all the help he 
can get. Most of all he wants truthful reports 
of cases where farmers have suffered injury 
or annoyance from hunters. If any reader 
can furnish such reports we hope they will 
write Mr. Greene at once. 



126 



THE GAME BREEDER 



GAME BIRDS 

TOR PROPAGATING PURPOSES 

Genuine Wild Mallards, Black Duck, Green-wing and Blue- 
wing Teal, Pintails, Gadwalls, Shovellers, Wood Duck, Widgeon, 
Red- heads, Blue-bills, also a few pairs of extra choice Canvas-backs 
and Ring-bills; Canadian, Greater and Lesser Snow, Ross, Brant, 
Hutchins, Cackling and Blue Geese, supplied for propagating 
purposes. Finest quality in the country. 

Golden, Silver, Amherst, Reeves Pheasants at reasonable prices. 
1 also am booking orders for ring-neck Pheasants reared on my 
preserve for delivery in early fall. 

I also have rare land and waterfowl from all parts of the world. 
Prices quoted for the asking. 

JOHN HEYWOOD, Gardner, Mass. 
Farms for the Propagation of Wild Fowl. 



The Best in Aquatic Plants 



Live Water Fowl 
Biological Material Supplied 



Clyde B. Terrell 

NATURALIST 

Specialist on Wild Duck Foods 
oshkosh, wis. 



Preserves Examined, Developed, 
and Plantings Superintended. 



All eggs from the very finest stock 
obtainable. Mated to non-related males 
to insure a high degree of fertility. 

Greatest possible vitality in young 
stock. 



Until May 1 5th 

Ringneck and Mallard Eggs, 
$25.00 a hundred 

Mongolian, $40.00 a hundred 



Packed in special crates to 
insure safe arrival. 

RIVER LAWN FARM 

147-153 West Mohawk St., BUfPALO, N. Y. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters : "Yours for More Game. 



"J 



THE GAME BREEDER 



127 




SAGO POND WEED 

And Other Wild Duck Foods 

For Sale in Large or Small Quantities 



If you wish to grow a wild duck food, that will grow 
anywhere except in salt water, and the very best duck food 
known, plant Sago Pond Weed, roots or seed. We will refer 
you to people who are growing it abundantly, and they will 
tell you how it has improved their shooting. Sago is what 
has held the ducks, geese and swans in Currituck for the past 
90 years, where they have been shot at more than any other 
place in America. 

We also ship wild celery roots and seeds. Chara, 
Widgeon grass roots, Red head grass and Wild rice roots. 
We will not ship Wild rice seed. 

I visit duck farms and preserves, and advise the 
planting of the proper foods after inspecting the 
soil, water, etc. Write me for prices and testi- 
monials from those who have used my foods 
with great success. 

JASPER B. WHITE, Waterlily, Currituck Sound, N. C. 



Io writing to advertiser's please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters : "Yours for More Game. ,; 






128 THE GAME BREEDER 



PHEASANTS, DUGKS AND EGGS 

Deer And Other Live Game 

FOR SAI/E, a superb lot of Golden, Silver and Amherst pheasants just 
right for breeding this spring and summer. 

I am now booking orders for eggs of the following varieties: Mon- 
golian, Ringneck, Chinese, Golden, Silver, Amherst and Reeves. 

Wood Duck, Mallard and Gray Call Duck eggs. 

All the eggs I ship are guaranteed to be from non-related, pure 
bred, strong, healthy birds, correctly mated; all. eggs are guaranteed not to 
be over three days old when they leave my farm. 

I also manufacture a full line of special foods for the successful raising 
of young pheasants and wild water fowl, also for feeding the old birds 
all the year 'round ; write for prices. 

WALLACE EVANS GAME FARM, ST. CHARLES, ILL. 

Largest and most successful breeders of pheasants, 
wild water fowl, deer, etc., in the world. 



STONY LONESOME GAME EARM 

Mallard Ducks and 
Mongolian Pheasants 

We offer for immediate delivery (limited number) of 

Mallard Ducks and Mongolian Pheasants 

and will take orders for eggs, delivery in the spring. 

ADDRESS 

129 Eront Street, New York City, 

or JOHN FOSTER, West Hartland, Connecticut 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



■ 



/ 



Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
Partridges and Pheasants. 





% ,«*7Z> 



Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

l aarry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 be&t 
Royal Swans of .England. I have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very larjje European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES. PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
* thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have «0 acres 
•of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — 1* will p»y yon to do »o. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 80 miles from Philadelphia. 




Department V. 



WM J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 



p 




: T1 



The Feeding of Sporting Dogs 

Every Gamekeeper knows and appreciates the difficulty of bringing the dogs 
up to "top notch'' in the matter of health, especially as the sporting season 
hoves in sight. Sporting dogs have to undertake difficult and exacting work 
necessitating a great expenditure of strength and vitality. Hence their feeding 
demands experience, judgment and consideration in selecting the best foods to 
sustain them and the exclusive use of those foods only. 
Sporting Dogs can be made capable of long sustained effort by liberally 
feeding them with 

SPRATT'S 
DOG CAKES 

which are now recognized in all sporting circles as the Food par excellence 
for keeping dogs up to standard fitness. Dogs fed on Spratt's Biscuits 
work better, behave better, live longer and are more reliable than those 
trained on any other foods. 



Spratt's Dog Cakes prevent dogs suffering from overstrain by providing 

A RESERVE STOCK OF VITALITY 

— just what so many dogs lack at the time when they need it most 



ARE YOU FEEDING YOUR DOGS ON SPRATT'S? 

If you are not, and wish to prove their value in a practical way, we will send you samples free 



'" Dog Culture" mailed on receipt of 2c. stamp. •' Pheasant Culture," price 25c. 

" Poultry Culture," 10c. 

SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

NEWARK, N.J. ; SAN FRANCISCO; ST. LOUIS; CLEVELAND; MONTREAL 

u =J 



ftiArt 18 j^j 




Single Copies 10 y. 



iiiii IIIHHIIIIIIIIII1I1IIIIIIIHII n nmT 




9 



THE* 



VOL. IX. 



AUGUST, 1916 



*W^?wrsl. 



?W*a**^l 



The- Object of this magazine- is 
/(to Make North America the 5iggest 
Game Producing Country in the World 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field — How About It? Much About It — 
What New Mexico Should Do — Failures— Cattle and Quail — 
Health-Giving Sport — Sword Fish and Sharks — " More " — 
A Good Book — A Missourian to a New Mexican — Rapid 
Progress— Farm Values — Ohio. 

Safe and Attractive Quail Grounds - D. W. Huntington 

Legal Rights of the Cat - - Edward Howe Forbush 

A Court's Opinion - - - Court of Appeals, N. Y. 

Comparative Value of Foods for Trout - Charles L. Paige 

The Masked Bob-white - - - D. G. Elliot and Others 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves - By Our Readers 

The Technique of Ant Eggs— Quail Breeding— Mallard Mating 
— Snakes — Snake and Wild Turkey — Breeding Wild Turkeys — 
A Quail Tent — More Quail — Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, Trout and 
Bass — A New Duck Trouble — What is an Owl ? — Shall the Farm 
Be Purchased? 

The State and the Hawk ... Joseph W. Lippincott 

Editorials — More Snakes — An Interesting Report— Our Quail and 
Partridges — More Water — Give the Quail and Grouse a Chance. 

Outings and Innings — Book Notices — Trade Notes. 



U 



OATI E DBEEDEB 



No. 5 




| imimillllllll | |lllli' llllllllllllllllllllllll iiiiiiiimiimiiinii iiiiuiiiiiuiim minium llllllinillllll llllllllinillllllllllllllll| 

PUSLISMED BY 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY, Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.S.A ^>y/>.tf 



iimnillllllllHIIIIIillllMHIIIIinilllUHIIIIIIMnilllMnilllininilNIIIHIIIIIUIIIIIIHIIHItlllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIHINHHtfNIJ. 



**, 



OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS 

THE NEW YORK TIMES 

"The subject is the development of a new crop — a flesh crop which has especial 
timeliness in view of the general exhaustion of our food supply. Mr. Huntington dis- 
cusses in the most practical manner the restoration of this crop of feathered game, 
and from the standpoint both of the sportsman and the market gunner, wild ducks, 
it seems, can be raised as easily and cheaply as domesticated ducks, and with 
equally excellent financial results. The way to do this is described with estimates 
of cost and citation of experience abroad, where the deficiency of food supply has 
led to the discovery and elaboration of many remedies to which we have not yet 
been forced. Mr. Huntington's book is illustrated with photographs, interesting 
alike to naturalists and breeders." 

WILLIAM BREWSTER 

" ' Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is obviously an able, comprehensive and very 
interesting treatise on a subject which has hitherto received but little attention from 
writers, especially in America, and concerning which naturalists, as well as sports- 
men, will, I am sure, be glad to be thus credibly and pleasingly informed." 

THE LOCKPORT UNION-SUN 

" Mr. Huntington has given to the American people an admirable treatise on the 
practical methods of making these splendid and desirable birds profitably plentiful. 
Ponds, streams and waste lands which do not pay the meagre taxes upon them can 
be utilized and be made to yield both handsome profits and good sport. This 
American authority on wild" game tells the farmers and land owners of this country 
how to do it." 

CHARLES HALLOCK 

" The wild fowl book is valuable, clearsighted and scholastic. It is a direct 
appeal to sportsmen of common sense and generous behavior, and they will readily 
absorb its comprehensive pages and act accordingly— and live thereby." 

;dr. r. w. shufeldt 

" I have enjoyed the treat in my reading of this book from frontispiece to finish 
and I wager anybody else will enjoy it. . . . The author has placed every sports- 
man, every naturalist and a great many other citizens of other callings squarely under 
obligations to him. The book is a direct and logical argument setting forth the 
means for the preservation in the future of our wild fowl and waders. . . . The 
illustrations are judiciously selected, interesting and materially add to the value of 
the volume." 

A. A. HILL 

" This is not only a readable book, but it is important in an economic sense, and 
it will especially appeal to all who are interested in the conservation of wild life, and 
especially our game birds." 

AUTOMOBILE DEALER AND REPAIRER 

" If the advice of Dwight W. Huntington, pioneer and apostle of the movement 
in this country for a rational game protection and conservation, be acted upon, the 
time is coming speedily when game will be as cheap as beef or mutton. At present, 
after fifty years of legal protection, we have no game to amount to anything save in 
the more remote sections. . . . The book is not only instructive in an economic 
sense, showing how to make wild duck preserves safe and attractive, how to get 
stock and eggs and the food required, but is delightful reading for all. The author 
of ' Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is doing a great public service in his campaign 
for more game." 

Our Wild Fowl and Waders will be sent to any address in the United States 
or Canada with The Game Breeder for one year upon receipt of $2.00. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY 

150 NASSAU STREET, N. Y. 






THE GAME BREEDER 



129 



;3fe 



When There Is Game 
Enough For All 

* The day is coming when there will 
be as much wild game in this country 
as there was fifty years ago. Men now 
living can remember the time when 
the sky was darkened by the flight of 
wild ducks, when wild turkeys, quail, 
grouse and other game birds abounded 
in our woods and fields. It does not 
take a great effort of imagination to 
picture what a return of these condi- 
tions will mean— not only to the sportsman but also 
to the farmer, the housewife and the market man. 

Game farming is the medium through which the change 
will be brought about. By the establishment of game farms 
throughout the covntry it will be possible not only to meet 
the present active demand for game birds (now far larger 
than the supply) but also the increased demand which 
will come. 

Game breeding is both profitable and pleasant. Any one 

having a small amount of land may start a game farm and 

raise birds for his own consumption and for sporting and 
marketing purposes. 

If these possibiiiiies appeal to you, or if you are interested 
from any standpoint in the increase of our game birds, write 
us for the book, "Game Farming for Profit and Pleasure". 
This book, which is sent without cost to those who ask for 
it, takes up the subject in a broad way and gives much 
interesting and valuable information regarding many different 
game birds, their habits, food, enemies, and the methods for 
breeding and marketing them. 

In writing for your copy please use the coupon below. 



Game Breeding Department, Room 202 

HERCULES POWDER CO. 

Wilmington, Delaware 

Manufarturers cf Explosives; Infallible and "E. C" Smokeless Shotgun Powders: 
L.A-R. Orange Extra Black Sporting Powders; Dynamite for Farming 






Gam- Dreading Dept., Room 202 

Hercules Powder Company, Wilmington, Del. 

Gentieraen: — Please send me a copy of "Game Farming for Profit and Pleasure' 



I am interested in game 



130 



THE GAME BREEDER 



To THE GAME BREEDER, 

150 Nassau Street, New York. 

Please send me THE GAME BREEDER, for one year. 

$1.00 enclosed. 

Name 

Street 

City 

State 

N. B.— Write Name and Street Address plainly and state if you 
wish hack numbers of the magazine to the first of the year. 



Heating and Cooking Stoves for 
Clubs and Cottages 



The Camp Cook Stove 

This is an ideal cook stove for the 
Mining, Lumber and Military 
Camps; will work just as well in 
the open air as indoors. 

Construction Companies working 
large gangs of men will find this 
well suited to their requirements. 




IRONSIDES 



Radnor Ranges 
Home Victor Ranges 
Victor Cook Dobule Oven 

Ranges 
Hotel Ranges 
Royal Victor Ranges 
No. io Ironsides Cook 
Patrol Wood Stove 
No. 90 Ironsides 
Haddon Ranges 



A FEW OF THE LEADING STOVES FURNISHED 



Home Victor Hot Water Stoves 

Farmer Girl Cook 

New H. A. Elm Double Heaters 

Vulcan Double Heaters 

Tropic Sun Heating Stoves 

Haddon Hercules Heating Stoves 

Ormond Ranges 

No. 15 Hot Blast Heating Stoves 

Victor Gem Cook 

Laundry Stoves 



Index Heating Stoves 
Solar Kent Heating 

Stoves 
Prompt Ranges 
Cozy Ranges 
Victor Cook Ranges 
Loyal Victor Ranges 
Victor Hotel Ranges 
Elm Ranges 
Farmer Boy Cook Stoves 



Our Friend Cook Stoves 
Sentry Wood Stoves 
Home Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Home Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Solar Cellar Furnaces 
Farmer's Furnaces and 

Cauldrons 



— — Manufactured by — — 

S. V. REEVES, 45 N. 2nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters : "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



131 



Get in Trim Now for the Game Season 



The game season will 
soon be here. Make sure 
of a big bag by being in 
form at the start. Get a 
Da Pont Hand Trap and 
practice field shooting. The 



The Powders that Win 

Dupont, 

Ballistite, 

Schultze and 

Dupont Black Sporting. 



SfPOJiD Hand Trap 

is a bully tester of gun skill — fine for 
both beginner and expert. 
It's a real machine — hand 
operated and simple — that 
throws all kinds of clay tar- 
gets. Makes them soar like 
a bird or scud like a jack 
rabbit. 

Better Get One Now 

Costs $4.00 at your dealer's. 
If he can't supply you we will 
send it direct postpaid any- 
where in the U. S. on receipt 
of price. 

Hand Trap Booklet No. 354 
sent on request 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. 

Wilmington Delaware 




In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.'" 



THE GAME BREEDER 



REMINGTON 
UMC 




Wyfm 



Kta 




ti 



For a 

Lifetime of 
First Class Sfiort 

r | ^HE way these guns hold their sufierb 
X shooting quality year after year is giving 
them the preference of hunters and trap- 
shooters all over the world. 

Remington UMC Pum£ Gun — "The Good Old 
Standby" — six shots, bottom ejection (empty 
shells, smoke, gas. go down, away from your face), 
solid breech, hammerless, safe. 
Remington UMC Autoloading Shot Gun — "The 
Auto Shot Gun that -works" — five shots ; simply 
pull the trigger for each shot, the recoil does the 
work ; solid breech ; hammerless ; safe. 

For the why and how of the mechanical details — the reasons 
for smooth, positive action and certainty of the guns hitting 
where they are aimed, go to the 'dealer displaying the Red Ball 
Mark of Remington UMC, the Sign of Sportsmen's Head- 
quarters in every town. 

Chan and oil your gun with REM OIL — the combina- 
tion Powder Solvent, Lubricant and Rust Preventative 

THE REMINGTON ARMS UNION METALLIC 
CARTRIDGE COMPANY 

Largest Manufacturers of Firearms and Ammunition 

in the World 
Woolworth Building New York 




T he Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Enteied as second-class matter. July a, 1915, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



VOLUME IX 



AUGUST, 1916 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 5 



How About It? 

Under the heading, "Foreign Species 
vs. American Game," The Pine Cone, the 
bulletin of the New Mexico Game 
Protective Association, says : 

According to a government report, about 
25,000 foreign game birds have been imported 
into this country since 1900, apparently at an 
average cost of about $10 per pair. Probably 
ten times as many have been bought from 
American dealers. A very rough guess would 
place the total expenditure for foreign species 
at $1,000,000. It is well known that a large 
majority of these operations have been failures. 
Without attempting any sweeping statements 
as to whether this money is wasted it is 
nevertheless obvious that it would have suf- 
ficed: 

(a) To finance 60 Game Protective Asso- 
ciations for 16 years. 

(b) To employ 60 paid wardens for 16 
years. 

(c) To reach every hunter in the United 
States with 10 appeals for conservation of 
native game. 

(d) To pay 20,000 rewards of $50 each for 
the apprehension of game-hogs. 

Much About It. 

Much can be said about it most of 
which is well known to readers of The 
Game Breeder. 

(a) We would say that the number of 
live birds imported is under-estimated 
We have no doubt that more than a mil- 
lion dollars have been sent abroad for 
live and dead game and often we have 
said that the laws should be amended so 
as to permit the sending of this money 
to American game farms. Over two- 
thirds of the States have amended their 
laws so as to encourage the breeding of 
all or certain species of game. Some 
States only permit the breeding of for- 
eign birds and wild ducks and deer. 

(b) The money "would have sufficed" 
to finance several times 60 game breeding 



associations which easily could produce 
several hundred thousand game birds an- 
nually. 

(c) It would have sufficed to reach 
every sportsman in the United States 
with 20 appeals to quit calling names as 
a means of increasing game ("game 
hog," etc.), to stop striving for the im- 
possible and to get busy in securing "more 
game and fewer game laws." 

(d) To pay 20,000 rewards of $50 
each to small breeders who produced 
over a thousand game birds annually. 

What New Mexico Should Do. 

New Mexico promptly should follow 
the lead of the other States and enact a 
modern game breeders' law permitting 
and encouraging the profitable breeding 
of all species of game. 

It seems almost ludicrous for New 
Mexico suddenly to wake up to the idea 
that it is wise to try and produce game 
by calling people who shoot game "hogs," 
since practically all of the other States 
have abandoned this plan. For a time 
some said "game pig" because the game 
became so scarce that there was not 
enough left to warrant the larger word 
hog, but recently this method of produc- 
ing game has been abandoned in the 
States which are producing game. 

Failures. 

As to the statement above quoted from 
Pine Cone, "that a large majority of 
these operations (importing game) have 
been failures" we would observe that the 
operations may be divided into two 
classes : 

(1) Importations by State game offi- 
cers. 

(2) Importations by commercial game 



134 



THE GAME BREEDER 



breeders, clubs and game preserve 
owners. 

It is true there have been some, in fact 
many decided failures where States have 
brought in thousands of innocent birds 
and turned them down to feed vermin. 
Connecticut, Missouri, Indiana, Kansas 
and other States spent many thousands 
of dollars for imported birds not one of 
which was legally shot and the birds prac- 
tically have vanished like snow on a 
warm sunny morning. 

In practically every case, however, 
where the importations were made by or 
for people who look after their game the 
increase has been tremendous. At many 
places a few thousand birds are shot 
every season. Many are sent to the 
New York market where they bring ex- 
cellent prices ; the money is used to pro- 
duce more game. We shall be glad to 
get an order from Pine Cone or its 
readers for an hundred thousand pheas- 
ants and wild ducks and we will agree 
that all of the birds will be shipped from 
American game farms at from $1 to $2 
less per bird than Pine Cone says was 
sent abroad for the imported stock. See 
advertisements in Game Breeder and 
order now if you want any game. 

We will place an order for a million 
game birds to be filled in two years' time 
and we are quite sure our readers will 
deliver the goods if a small deposit be 
made to insure good faith. 

Cattle and Quail. 

New Mexico has encouraged or at 
least permitted the cattle industry. In 
a report issued by the United States 
Agricultural Department we read that 
one of the most interesting and valuable 
quail formerly found in the Southwestern 
part of the United States has probably 
become extinct since cattle were intro- 
duced on its range. See article in this 
issue on the masked bobwhite. 

Pine Cone uses a buffalo skull with 
the words : "Where are the buffaloes ?" as 
its trade mark and a very fat pig to illus- 
trate its methods. We can answer the 
question. Our readers will supply all the 
buffaloes any New Mexican may want 
at a fair price. We would like to know 
on whose ranch they can be introduced 



as sporting animals for the public to 
shoot. 

A good herd of these animals was sold 
not long ago to Canada because no one 
in the United States seemed to want 
them. Send an order to The Game 
Breeder, Pine Cone, and we will see that 
you get some buffaloes — if you need any 
buffaloes. 

Health Giving Sport. 

Under date of July 2, a press report 
from Woodsfield, Ohio, brings the fol- 
lowing announcement of a centenarian's 
challenge to other Buckeye hunters who 
are fourscore years — or more — of age : 

"On July 4, John Hally, G. A. R. vet- 
eran, celebrates his 106th birthday. To- 
day he issued a coon hunting challenge 
to any Ohioan over eighty. 

" 'It's the simple life,' the old man de- 
clared, when some youngsters of fifty 
asked how he had managed to live so 
long. 'I've beaten my father now. He 
died at 103.' 

"Freedom from worry, abstinence 
from tobacco and intoxicants and plenty 
of coon hunting is Mr. Hally's recipe if 
you'd live to be 106." — Sportsmen's Re- 
view. 

Sword Fish and Sharks. 

Since the unfortunate accidents on the 
New Jersey coast, where sharks have di- 
rectly caused the death of two persons, 
your correspondents have suggested that 
their presence is due to the Gulf Stream 
and to the hunger of these rapacious sea 
wolves. While these statements are true 
we must remember that the commercial 
activity shown in capturing swordfish in 
these latitudes is actually the reason why 
the waters every year show increase of 
sharks. 

The sharks will multiply to the harm 
and danger of the many resorts whose 
means of revenue is salt water bathing. 
The swordfish is an enemy of the shark. 
This is verified by the battles waged on 
the sea's surface whenever the one meets 
the other. Protect your swordfish as you 
protect your birds and your waters will 
be free of the shark. 

The argument advanced that sharks do 
not attack human beings is not borne 



THE GAME BREEDER 



135 



out by the record of maritime events. 
In the city of Havana, Cuba, there was 
a colored man famous for his periodical 
battles with sharks until he fell a victim 
to one of these sea monsters. There *is 
no island of the West Indies on the main- 
land of South America that could not 
produce the facts to show that sharks 
have got away with parts of the anatomy 
of persons who have fallen overboard or 
who have been indiscreet by bathing or 
exposing themselves in such waters. 

As early as the eighteenth century 
Ulloa records that off the Colombia coast 
where the Spaniards had their negro 
slaves engaged in the pearl fisheries their 
greatest dangers were from sharks and 
devilfish. The negro divers who were 
reputed to be the most expert of their 
day, not only could battle with sharks 
but maintained the demand for their 
services and the fishery was kept up spe- 
cially off Panama for more than a hun- 
dred years. 

The sharks would leave the waters 
saturated with the crimson color of 
blood, while the devilfish. carried off his 
victims and left no trace whatever. 
Charles Darwin has left us enough on 
the instinct of animals, and the sharks 
seem to be indeed remarkably sensitive 
to the appearance of individuals in the 
waters off the coast. — Arthur A. Shom- 
burg, in New York Sun. 

More. 

"More'' is getting to be a common and 
a great big word all over the country. 

More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 

Many thousands of readers now end 
their letters, "Yours for More Game." 

We especially wish to see "more" quail 
and grouse trapped for propagation pur- 
poses. How absurd it is for some States 
to say you may kill 3 or 10 or some other 
number of quail during the season but 
you must not ask permission to take a 
similar number of birds alive for propa- 
gation. 

The State should distribute "more" 
stock birds to those who will agree to 
multiply their numbers. Vermin in many 
places get more State game than the 
sportsmen can secure. Often it is eaten 



up before the last-named arrive on the 
ground. 

A Good Book. 

John W. Talbot, one of the leading 
practical game protectionists of this coun- 
try, has published a very good book on 
"Game Laws and Game." 

The first part is devoted to a discus- 
sion of the absurdities which exist in 
many State enactments and the second 
part is devoted to Pheasants, their Rear- 
ing and Hatching. 

The text of the first part indicates that 
Mr. Talbot is filled with righteous indig- 
nation (the kind which it is perfectly 
proper for even Quakers to have — we had 
it at the start) as he contemplates the 
preventive sections of the laws which 
tend to protect the game off the face of 
the earth. He cites a recent important 
decision by the New York Court of Ap- 
peals, which indicates that the court does 
not approve of statutes which have the 
effect of restricting an article of com- 
merce although they be written to pro- 
tect game or to promote health. We 
reprint the decision and it seems certain 
it will be hailed with delight by those 
who are fond of common sense and good 
laws and who would like to see the mar- 
kets full of game during long open sea- 
sons, as they soon will be. Mr. Talbot's 
book costs $1. It is published by The 
Game Bird Society, South Bend, Ind. 
All more-gameists will be delighted with 
the game law discussion and breeders will 
find the part on pheasant breeding in- 
structive and interesting. Mr. Talbot has 
made a valuable contribution to the 
"more game" movement. 

A Missourian to a New Mexican. 

It wud bee a pitty fur this law too be 
declaired unconstytooshunul. Enny one 
who reeds what Mr. Alldoo Leopold says 
about tha state being all covered over 
with watter-foul, wud niver wish tha 
state tha bad luck uv again being put 
back into tha condishion she was in when 
I saw her frum tha winddow uv that 
toorist car, gasping fur me breath and 
no watter ennywhear to quensch me 
thurst. 

I wish too say that I perfectly agree 



/$C ® THE GAME BREEDER 

with tha ten reesuns given bye Mr. All- quail will be shot. We shall give special 

doo Leopold, why the Supreem Coart uv attention to quail and grouse breeding 

tha Unitted States shud not be purmitted during the coming year, 

to declair this law unconstytooshinul. Undoubtedly the United States will be 

This reminds me uv a lawyer who wus the biggest pheasant producing country 

hired to defend a frind uv mine. Said in the world within five years at the 

he too tha Judge : "I have ten reasons present rate of increase. We are inclined 

why me cliant kant be in coart today, to believe that already we have more wild 

Tha furst reesun is that me cliant is dead, ducks than any country in the world and 

The second reason is " "Hold on," the numbers rapidly are increasing. More 

sed tha Judge, "tha first reesun is suffi- wild fowl are marketed, no doubt, m 

shunt; don't take up too much time uv England than in America, but this is be- 

tha coart tellin' about tha other nine cause about 5,000 market gunners are 

reesuns. Tha defendunt is disscharged permitted to shoot wild fowl in England 

fur want uv jurisdiction uv this coart too with huge punt guns. Ducks are brought 

try tha case, so I hope he is resting easy to the market from the public waters just 

in hell. Call the next case." as fish are in large numbers. The Louis- 

If this Fedderul law is uphelled bye iana, California and some other markets 

tha Supream Coart, us Missourians will are creditable. We believe we have as 

take our meddisin, but I kant garrantee many or probably more wild ducks than 

that tha "gaime hogs" will sell ther shoot- the English markets have. 

in' irons and quit that skatter gun gaime ; = 

I rathur expect thay will all buy raleroad Farm Values. 

tickets fur New Mexico, wher tha state We received a long and interesting let- 
is all covered with watterfoul and tha ter from one of our New York readers 
jacksnipe and road runners is basking in who wishes to purchase a farm of 250 
tha sun, while tha jack rabbits is chaising acres in Virginia for game farming. It 
the coyotes throo tha mesquite and tha will be interesting to learn if the sale of 
magpies is learning how too talk by hoi- this farm is prevented by "fool" game 
lerin' "gaime hog" too tha hunters frum laws prohibiting the profitable production 
tha Middul West fur introoding into tha of food. We are investigating this sub- 
State uv New Mexico. J ect an d we hope to publish a full state- 
Yours respeckfully ment of the facts in our next issue. 
Michael Joseph Flannigan. Farms where game can be produced and 

Saint Louie, Missouri. sold, at present prices, are worth twice 

Sportsmen's Review. as much as farms where the owners are 

= hable to arrest for food producing. 

Rapid Progress. = 

We are well pleased with the results Ohio. 

obtained by elk and deer breeders and By a singular coincidence an Ohio 

by the breeders of pheasants and wild farmer called at the office of The Game 

ducks. Hundreds of deer breeders have Breeder the same day we received the 

deer. Thousands now own pheasants inquiry about purchasing a farm in Vir- 

and ducks; in many cases the numbers ginia. Our Ohio friend when we asked 

are surprising. We have inquiries as to him why he had sold his farm and left 

where the most birds will be shot next the State, said he would not live in a 

fall. We are quite sure the biggest bag State which prohibited quail shooting and 

which we will report will run over five prevented the increase of this desirable 

thousand birds. We have an idea where bird. He says he has many quail, ruffed 

this will be done and we will report the grouse and other game birds on his new 

shoot later. place and enjoys living in a State where 

The game laws have retarded the in- there is more freedom than there is in 

crease of the quail and grouse in some Ohio. We are a little surprised that 

States but at a number of places the bags more farmers do not appeal to the farm 

will run over a thousand birds in Novem- journals to help them secure game breed- 

ber and at a few places several thousand ers' laws in the slow States. 






THE GAME BREEDER 



137 



SAFE AND ATTRACTIVE QUAIL GROUNDS. 

By D. W. Huntington. 



The individual or club, having ar- 
ranged with the owners of some posted 
farms to rent the shooting, should not 
imagine that they can shoot much if any 
of the game found in the fields and 
woods without causing it rapidly to be- 
come extinct unless some practical game 
preserving be undertaken. 

The vermin, which surely is present, 
although not much may be seen, will 
check the increase of the game leaving 
only enough stock birds to restock the 
fields. Should the sportsmen take up 
the destruction after the vermin has been 
fed they will shoot the birds intended for 
restocking and the result will be disas- 
trous as such shooting always has been. 
On the average farm many of the fields 
will be unattractive to game and even 
uninhabitable. Closely cropped pastures, 
closely tilled fields surrounded by 
barbed-wire fences, open woods where 
the briars and underbrush have been 
eliminated are neither safe nor attrac- 
tive to upland game and in closely culti- 
vated regions the fields should be made 
safe and attractive before game birds are 
turned down. 

It is highly desirable to have game in 
every field. The more evenly it is dis- 
tributed the better it will be not only for 
the birds who do not stand overcrowding 
and for the sportsmen who should enjoy 
seeing the dogs point game often. 

It is not a difficult matter to make un- 
attractive fields attractive. The two 
things to be done are to provide cover 
and food. The best cover for open fields 
is small briar patches. The blackberry 
and wild rose make excellent covers and 
both supply excellent food ; the seeds 
from the berries which wither on the 
briars and the hips of the wild rose are 
excellent winter foods and can be ob- 
tained above the snow. A narrow strip 
of briars and wild grasses and weeds will 
make a safe cover beside the wire fences 
and if some grain be planted and left 
standing the quail and grouse will find 



the ground both safe and attractive ; and 
if the numerous natural enemies be well 
controlled with the gun and trap a good 
number of birds can be shot safely every 
season. A narrow strip of corn and a 
narrow strip of wheat, buckwheat rye or 
barley and the weeds which will appear 
will supply all the food needed. The 
corn will afford shade in summer and 
some of the grain can be fed to the birds 
in the winter. Where special plantings 
are made in pastures they should be in- 
closed with a wire to keep out the cattle. 
An inexpensive fence run parallel to one 
or more of the fences inclosing the field 
and only a few feet distant will inclose 
a food cover area which will yield some 
■ excellent shooting for two guns one on 
either side of the cover. 

Open woods can be made attractive by 
planting briars in a few places ; and a 
few old tree tops and brush piles such as 
we used to find plentiful in the woods 
will be found desirable. A small clearing 
made in the woods and planted with quail 
foods including a little lettuce and other 
garden plants clover and grass will 
surely hold one or more covies. Grit and 
dusting places easily can be arranged in 
such clearings. They can be made at 
small expense but the farmer should be 
compensated for the use of the small 
areas planted especially for the quail. 

The vermin will find it difficult to take 
many birds in the briar patches. Sports- 
men, no doubt, often have observed how 
quickly the quail fly to the briars when 
flushed on the stubbles. No hawk can 
strike them there and the fox cannot 
catch birds running in briars. 

The keeper should persistently destroy 
the snakes, hawks, crows and other ver- 
min and he will find a terrier useful in 
aiding him to locate the ground vermin. 
The foregoing applies to farms in the 
Central and Western States where there 
is often no cover at certain seasons of the 
year. On the prairies in the West when 
the stubble and weeds are plowed under 



138 



THE GAME BREEDER 



not a sunflower, wild rose or even a weed 
remains on vast areas. There is abso- 
lutely no cover and no food and under 
such conditions laws prohibiting shooting 
at all times will not save the game and 
certainly they will not restore it on miles 
of land where it has been extirpated. 

In many of the Eastern and Southern 
States the conditions are quite different. 



Where agriculture has waned and where 
the weeds, brush and briars are over- 
abundant the ground should be made at- 
tractive by cutting openings and rides 
through the brush and by making many 
attractive fields, small ones will do, where 
grain and other foods are planted. It is 
far more difficult to control the vermin 
on such areas than it is on the closely 
tilled farms of the West. 



LEGAL RIGHTS OF THE CAT. 

By Edward Howe Forbush. 



During the past century cat lovers have 
made many attempts to prove that their 
pets are entitled to some rights under the 
law, but English law seems to find little 
merit in their claims. An articled clerk, 
writing to the London Standard, says : 

It is clearly laid down in "Addison on 
Torts" that a person is not justified in 
killing his neighbor's cat or dog which he 
finds on his land, unless the animal is in 
the act of doing some injurious act which 
can be prevented by its slaughter. If a 
person sets on his land a trap for foxes, 
and baits it with such strong-smelling 
meat as to attract his neighbor's dog or 
cat on to his land to the trap, and sucn 
animal is injured or killed, he is liable 
for the cat, though he had no such inten- 
tion and though the animal ought not to 
have been on his land. 

The French courts have given the cat 
owner no damages in such or similar 
cases. The local magistrate of Fontaine- 
bleau heard a case in which a man, an- 
noyed by neighboring cats, kept traps in 
his garden and caught fifteen. The 
neighbors combined to bring him to jus- 
tice. The judge decided in favor of the 
neighbors, but in a higher correctional 
tribunal the decision was reversed.* In 
' some European countries cats are outside 
the law the moment they leave their 
owner's premises, or as soon as they have 

*The Cat, Past and Present, translated from 
- the French of M. Champfleury, with notes by 
Mrs. Cashel Hoey, 1885, pp. 65, 66. 



passed beyond a certain radius from a 
building. In certain German cities cats 
are licensed also, but have no rights when 
they have passed certain limits. Herr 
Friedrich Schwabe, head of the von Ber- 
lepsch School of Bird Protection at See- 
bach, writes a? follows to Mr. William P. 
Wharton of Groton (translated from the 
German) : 

The law for killing roaming cats varies 
according to whether it is carried out by 
those empowered to do so or by owners 
without authorization. The former may, 
without further ceremony, shoot any cat, 
whether roaming wild or not, which they 
find on their beat, no matter whether the 
owner is known to them or not. But they 
(the shooters) must keep a certain dis- 
tance away from any inhabited building, 
this distance varying in different States 
(usually it amounts to 200 metres). In 
most domains, those having the legal 
right to shoot may even demand a tee 
from the owner of the cat, which fee the 
owner must pay. The owner of a garden 
or park who has suffered damage on ac- 
count of bird-catching cats need only 
refer to paragraph 228 of our code of 
civil law if he wishes to legally justify 
the killing of cats. "After this any one 
who harms or destroys a foreign object 
in order to ward off threatened danger 
from himself or from some other person 
does not commit an illegal act, provided 
the harm or destruction is necessary for 
warding off the danger, and provided the 







THE GAME BREEDER 



139 



damage is not out of proportion to the 
danger." Applied to the cat question 
that means : The owner of a garden in 
which birds brood may kill cats appear- 
ing there if he is able to prove that these 
cats prey upon the birds and their broods. 
To be sure, judicial decisions unfavorable 
to owners of gardens, these owners hav- 
ing killed cats, are not lacking. But in 
these cases there were culpable accessory 
circumstances, such as the use of firearms 
without a permit, or inadmissible near- 
ness to inhabited buildings. 

Our laws are unquestionably inade- 
quate, and for that reason the govern- 
ment and the representatives of the peo- 
ple will very soon be obliged to take new 
measures for the protection of birds. 

The experiment of taxing cats has also 
been tried in order to reduce their num- 
ber, but this measure has been taken only 
by towns, and the result cannot yet be 
seen. 

An important point of view is given, 
in any event, by the fact that the domestic 
cat — with you in America as well as here 
with us — cannot be considered and es- 
teemed a native animal belonging to the 
lineal fauna, but that it is an imported 
stranger which one can justly return to 
the house of its owner. There is no 
reason why the privilege of roaming 
about freely, denied other domestic ani- 
mals, should be given to the cat. 

According to Dr. Clifton F. Hodge this 
is practically the solution of the problem 
reached by Baron von Berlepsch in Ger- 
many, and there cities provide traps 
which are continually kept baited and set 
for stray cats. According to this writer 
Hamburg has 300 such traps that during 
the three years previous to the publica- 
tion of his book had rid the city of 6,226 
cats. He mentions Berlin, Hamburg, 
Elberfeld, Barmen, Frankfort, Lineburg, 
Nuremberg, Pirna, Oels, Breslau, etc., as 
making official provision for the destruc- 
tion of cats, and states that in Munster 
there has existed for some years an 
"Anti-Cat Society" which has already de- 
stroyed several thousand of these "beasts 
of prey." 

In Europe the cat owner seems to have 
been defeated in the higher courts. In 
America the owners of domesticated ani- 



mals have their rights defined by law, 
but the status of the cat seems to have 
been determined largely by the opinion 
of the presiding justice, who may regard 
it as domesticated or as a wild animal. 

The following is an extract from a 
newspaper report of a portion of the de- 
cision of Judge Utley of Worcester in a 
case where Dr. Dellinger was arraigned 
for injuring and destroying cats that 
were molesting birds that he was en- 
gaged to care for : 

A cat is a wild animal. There is no 
wilder animal in Christendom. It is an. 
animal that can't be controlled and you 
can't tell what it will do when it gets out 
of its owner's sight. A man on his own 
property has a right to protect it, and 
when wild animals encroach on it, he is 
justified in getting rid of them. I find on 
the evidence presented in this case that 
the defendant was justified in doing what 
he did. I don't mean, however, to assert 
that a man has the right to throw stones 
promiscuously any place. The defendant 
is discharged. (Judge Samuel Utley, 
Criminal Session of the Central District 
Court, in re Thomas Butler vs. Dr. Oris 
P. Dellinger. — Worcester Evening Post, 
September 27, 1905.) 

There is a later decision in Maine 
which is favorable to the cat, but the cir- 
cumstances were reversed, as the owner 
of the cat was the defendant. 

The following appears in the Rural 
New-Yorker : 

A man in Maine owned a valuable fox 
terrier dog which went upon a neighbor's 
property and chased a cat. While it was 
doing si the owner of the cat shot the 
dog and i.illed it. The dog's owner sued 
the neighi'.ir for damages, and won a. 
verdict on ,he ground that the cat is not: 
a domestic .animal and therefore not en- 
titled to legal protection. * * * The 
cat owner was not satisfied and appealed 
the case, his lawyer making a long argu- 
ment to show that the cat is even more a 
domestic animal than a dog. He suc- 
ceeded, and the court reversed the lower 
verdict, which means that the cat owner 
was justified in protecting his property. 
He apparently had as much right to kill 
a dog which chased his cat as he would 



140 



THE GAME BREEDER 



have in the case of dogs found worrying 

sheep. 

It will be noted that in both the above 
cases the owner of the property or his 
agent were sustained. A man killing 
another's cat or dog on his own property 
may have some legal rights that he might 
not claim in killing it on the owner's 
property. Malicious killing probably 
would be unlawful also, as it might come 
under the head of malicious mischief, and 
cruelty must be avoided. Dr. Henry Hall 
of Binghamton, N. Y., was convicted 
June 8, 1912, before Judge Albert Hotch- 
kiss of the City Court of Binghamton, 
apparently not for killing a cat, but for 
failing to kill it and leaving it to suffer. 
The doctor shot, with a rifle, a cat that 
was attempting to kill a bird at his drink- 
ing fountain, and left it for dead, without 
taking means to determine whether it was 
dead or alive. The cat returned to con- 
sciousness with its jaw broken, and 
crawled away. The doctor was fined $25, 
appealed the case to the County Court of 
Broome County before Judge Parsons, 
and there the conviction was sustained 
December 27, 1912. This seems to have 
been a conviction for cruelty to animals. 
Had the cat been shot dead the plaintiff 
would have had no case. Appolinary 
Kane of Binghamton was sentenced by 
Judge Hotchkiss in July, 1915, to thirty 
days in jail for shooting a cat which he 
claimed had been killing his chickens. 
The shot mutilated the cat, and Mr. Kane 
then went into the house and left the cat 
to die in agony. It behooves those who 
shoot cats to beware of bungling and 
unnecessary cruelty, and to finish the task 
if they begin it. But there seems to be 
no law to prevent the humane killing of 
stray cats anywhere, unless one breaks 
laws against shooting within city limits, 
within a certain distance of a dweling, 
on the public highway or on public lands ; 
provided also that the trespass laws are 
not broken in the act. Those who intend 
to poison or trap cats in Massachusetts 
should observe the provisions of chapter 
626 of the Acts of 1913, which reads as 
follows : 

Section 1. Whoever shall place or dis- 
tribute poison in any form whatsoever, 
for the purpose of killing any animal, or 



shall construct, erect, set, repair or tend 
any wire snare for the purpose of catch- 
ing or killing any animal, shall be pun- 
ished by a fine not exceeding one hundred 
dollars : provided, that nothing in this 
section shall be construed to prohibit any 
person from placing in or near his house, 
barns or fields, poison intended to destroy 
rats, woodchucks or other pests of a like 
nature or insects of any kind. 

Section 2. Any person who shall set, 
place, maintain or tend a steel trap with 
a spread of more than six inches or a 
steel trap with teeth jaws, or a ""stop- 
thief" or choke trap with an opening of 
more than six inches shall be punished by 
a fine of not exceeding one hundred dol- 
lars. 

Section 3. Any person who shall set, 
maintain, or tend a steel trap on enclosed 
land of another without the consent in 
writing of the owner thereof, and any 
person who shall fail to visit at least once 
in twenty-four hours, a trap set or main- 
tained by him shall be punished by a fine 
not exceeding twenty dollars. 

Section 70, chapter 212, Revised Laws 
(1902), provides a penalty for cruelly 
abandoning any domestic animal. Only 
a few convictions for desertine cats have 
been secured under this law for the rea- 
son that it often is hard to prove which 
has been abandoned, cat or owner. 

Send in the News. 

We appreciate the fact that game 
breeders are very busy during the breed- 
ing season but we are sure they find time 
to read the interesting notes sent to The 
Game Breeder by our readers. 

It only takes a few minutes to write 
a few lines about the game and the ver- 
min, about the successes, accidents or 
even failures. All are interesting. All 
tend to help the "more game" movement 
on its way and to make new converts. 

We hope soon to enlarge the publica- 
tion and to print many more practical 
short stories of actual occurrences. 



An Angler's Tale. 

Priscilla asked John Alden why 
didn't speak for himself. 

"I don't talk when I fish," he answered 



he 






THE GAME BREEDER " 141 



A COURT'S OPINION. 



In the case of People vs. Buffalo Fish criminal law and permit an accused per- 
Co., 164 N. Y. 93, 52 L. R. A. 803, the son to testify in his own behalf, the 
Court of Appeals of New York was proposition was for a long time resisted 
called up to pass on the validity of a by similar arguments. It was said that 
statute "forbidding any person to * * * the temptation to swear falsely under 
be possessed of certain fish during the such circumstances was so great that 
close season therein prescribed." The crime could never be punished if the ac- 
defendants bought fish in Canada to sell cused was permitted to testify in his own 
in New York and were charged with behalf, whereas experience has shown 
being possessed of them in New York, that a person on trial for a penal offense 
The court held if the law covered the very rarely, if ever, helps his case by 
case and made criminal "being possessed falsehood. Indeed, it may be safely as- 
of imported fish," it was unconstitutional serted that the new law, instead of 
and void because it was a violation of the thwarting justice, as anticipated, has 
interstate commerce provisions of the been a very great aid in the enforcement 
Federal Constitution. In deciding the of the criminal law. There is not the 
case, Judge O'Brien, speaking for the slightest reason for giving a strained and 
court, said : "An act to protect game or unnatural construction to the statute in 
to promote health may be so framed and question in order to meet such an imag- 
applied as to restrict and regulate traffic inary danger. The possession of the fish 
in some article of commerce, and when or game at the forbidden season, within 
it does it is just as obnoxious as if passed this State, is prima facie evidence that 
for that purpose under a title expressing the possessor has violated the law, and 
that very intent. * * * " "But it is the burden is then cast upon him of prov- 
argued that, unless the statute is con- ing facts to show that the possession was 
strued to inhibit the possession during lawful. If he has no better defense than 
the closed season of fish imported from one based on falsehood, it will be entirely 
a foreign country, it cannot be enforced, safe to trust to the power of cross-exam- 
but will be evaded by false swearing, ination and the intelligence of the court 
This means that if the summer-hotel and jury to detect and expose it, as in 
keeper, the owner of the private pond, offenses of much greater magnitude, 
and the foreign importer, under the cir- * * * " "The main proposition, after 
cumstances stated, are allowed to escape, all, in support of the plaintiff's conten- 
then someone else may falsely pretend tion, is based more upon policy and ex- 
that his possession of fish during the close pediency than upon law. When fairly 
season was obtained in a similar manner, stated, it is this : A statute to protect 
when in fact he is really guilty of violat- fish and game within the State does not 
ing the law by procuring them from the protect unless it inhibits the importation 
waters of the state. This argument of fish and game from a foreign ccantry 
seems to be based upon the notion that or another State. When this proposition 
unless the innocent are convicted the is carefully examined, it will be found 
guilty may escape. It assumes that in to be not only without any foundation in 
the interpretation of a penal statute, such fact or in experience, but, when applied 
a remote danger must be anticipated and to cases like the one in hand, the mani* 
guarded against. I think it puts rather fest tendency is to defeat the very object 
too much faith in the potency of perjury of the law, which, of course, must be 
as a defense to an honest claim, and too assumed to be protection. The individual 
little in the capacity of courts and juries who is permitted to hunt and fish in Can- 
to distinguish truth from falsehood, ada or in another State, and bringwith 
When it was proposed to change the him here the fruits of his labor, will do 



142 THE GAME BREEDER "" '■ -^ 

very much less of hunting and fishing at during the close season. To forbid the 
home. If his warfare upon game or fish taking of fish in a foreign country or in 
is carried on in a foreign country or in another State, where it is lawful, by our 
another State, it would seem to be unwise own citizens, during the season, or the 
to prevent him for the purpose of pro- possession within the State of what is so 
tecting fish and game at home. The game taken, tends to exterminate rather than 
law that cuts off the supply from abroad protect fish here. The legislator who 
diminishes, rather than increases and pro- would protect the forests of this State 
tects, the supply at home. Legislation by prohibiting the importation of lumber 
that would prohibit the defendant from or timber from Canada or from other 
drawing a supply of fresh fish from Can- States would be rated as a visionary 
ada during the close season simply fur- theorist, but in a certain degree that is 
nishes a strong temptation to procure it the principle upon which the argument 
from the waters of this State, even in for the People in this case proceeds for 
violation of law. It is said that there is the protection of fish and game. What 
a passion inherent in man to kill or cap- is true with respect to the forests is 
ture game, in spite of penal laws forbid- equally true of every other natural prod- 
ding it. If that be so, it would seem to uct of the soil or of the waters of the 
be wisdom to allow the passion to expend State, so that it is plain that the plain- 
itself by permitting those who enjoy it to tiff's theory of this case, when put into 
capture and become possessed of fish or complete operation all around the bound- 
game in Canada, or in other States where aries of the State, would, instead of pro- 
the law permits it, rather than furnish tecting fish and game, go far to exter- 
a temptation to violate the law at home minate both." 



THE COMPARATIVE VALUE OF FOODS FOR RAINBOW 
TROUT AND OTHER SALMONOIDS. 

By Charles L. Paige. 

To demonstrate the comparative value influences, climatic or aquatic conditions,. 
•of different kinds of food for young sal- prevailing habits of the fishes, and many 
monoids with any degree of exactness other circumstances for consideration, 
must necessarily entail very patient and After experiments and study covering 
careful investigation. The fishes experi- a period of many years, supplemented by 
:mented with will have to be maintained close observation of the fish in small 
in separate pools, under identical pro- areas of inclosed water, I can suggest no 
-visions of environment, water supply and new form of food artificially prepared 
area, temperatures, and the possible sup- superior in any respect to that commonly 
plies' of natural food carried by or exist- used in most hatcheries where young sal- 
ing in the water or in the pools them- monoids are fed. For fry I should pre- 
selves. Where there exists wide diver- f er these foods in the order here named : 
sity of opinion as to food values for the 1. Raw beef liver, finely ground, for 
higher orders of animals, to demonstrate the first five days or week, 
the values of such atomic particles as are 2. Fresh lean meat finely ground, 
collected by the young fish will tax the 3. Any available fresh lean meat mixed 
powers of the most exact scientific analy- with increasing portions of wheat mid- 
sis. Any demonstration of the mainte- dlings, fed either in the raw state or after 
nance of the fishes will in itself be sub- being cooked as a mush, 
ject to question as to specific hereditary In the preparation of any meat food 



THE GAME BREEDER 



143 



(after five or six days feeding of raw 
liver alone to newly hatched fry) the 
fresh liver and meat should be thoroughly 
ground together with from one-fourth to 
three-fourths of its weight of wheat mid- 
dlings. The middlings, in itself good 
food which will sustain fish indefinitely, 
is particularly valuable in absorbing and 
holding the juices of meats and makes 
a mixture of about the right consistency 
and gravity to remain in suspense or 
slowly sink in water, while it is easily 
distinguished by the fishes once they are 
accustomed to it. It is a cheap and gen- 
erally available staple. Food prepared 
as described may be readily dried and 
preserved for emergencies where a fresh 
supply of meat is lacking. 

That millions of trout and salmon fry 
. have been and are being maintained in 
overcrowded hatching troughs upon a 
diet of beef liver would appear to be 
positive evidence of its great value, while 
it is commonly as easily and cheaply ob- 
tainable as any form of animal food. 

The chief object of this paper, how- 
ever, is to suggest that young salmon and 
salmonoids reared in captivity should be 
given the minimum quantity of artificia 1 
food and a maximum area and flow of 
water containing their natural food, for 
which they should be permitted to forage. 
Prepared food should supplement the 
natural supply where water area is over- 
crowded with young fish, or where 
drouth, cold or other climatic conditions 
interfere with the normal natural supply. 
In support of this view is offered the 
following summary of well-known or 
readily ascertained facts and examples : 

1. That along the salmon rivers and 
trout streams fry existing under natural 
provisions are commonly in excellent 
physical condition, mortality among them 
being mainly caused by abnormal disturb- 



ances of the nests, such as floods, drouths 
or extraordinary climatic changes, or by 
the depredations of natural enemies, 
birds, reptiles and other animals. 

2. That salmonoids are not surface- 
feeding fishes exclusively, but seek food 
suspended in the water and on the shores 
and bottom surfaces accessible to them; 
and that of necessity they must collect 
more or less vegetable and sedimentary 
matter; in fact, that they are rather om- 
nivorous than piscivorous or carnivorous 
fishes. 

3. That under normal natural condi- 
tions a continuous succession of season- 
able aquatic and insectiverous foods, 
much of which will embrace vegetable 
matter in some form, is supplied to the 
young fish. 

4. That owing to the minute particles 
of food matter collected by newly 
hatched salmonoids, it is doubtless im- 
possible to distinguish with accuracy the 
natural or instinctive selections made by 
them, or to determine nutritive values. 

5. That it will appear that suitable 
natural food for salmonoids is abundant 
in the waters wherever trout and salmon 
spawn, and that the most available, 
economical and scientific provision for 
young salmonoids may be made in the 
preparation and adaptation of sufficient 
w r ater area in normal natural condition, 
but subject to control as regards floods, 
drouths, freezing to extremes, and the 
exclusion of destructive animals. Con- 
trolled areas of stream or prepared runs 
should provide for the absolute regulation 
of the water flow, and should contain 
trap pools or other devices for collecting 
the fish, excluding them at the end of 
the spawning season, and finally reducing 
the flow of water to a minimum for the 
purpose of capturing the fry or young 
as may be desired. — Bulletin of the 
Bureau of Fisheries. 



144 



THE GAME BREEDER 



THE MASKED BOB-WHITE. 



This singularly colored quail, Elliot 
says, is unlike any other species inhab- 
iting America north of Mexico. It is 
found in southern Arizona and Sonora, 
Mexico, especially in the district lying 
between the gulf coast of Sonora and 
the Barboquivary range, and is abundant 
between the last-named mountains and 
the Plomoso. Mr. Hubert Brown, of 
Tucson, Arizona, was the first to obtain 
this bird within the limits of the United 
States and he says that it is found on 
the Sonoita Creek, about sixty miles 
north of the Sonora line, and from the 
Sonoita valley it ranges in a westerly 
direction within Arizona territory for a 
hundred miles through a strip of country 
not thirty miles wide. In a wild state 
this quail does not appear to be nearly 
so abundant in the country it inhabits 
(at least on our side of the line) as are 
the other species of quail that are indig- 
enous to our soil and inhabitants of the 
same state. The masked quail found in 
Arizona are apparently but an overflow 
across our border from the main body of 
birds in Sonora. They are met with in 
the valley, on the table-lands and even 
as high as 6,000 feet, two having been 
killed at that elevation in the Huachucka 
Mountains, in a canyon about fifteen 
miles north of the border but nowhere 
can they be considered abundant. 

The masked quail has a call note which 
resembles exactly that of the Northern 
species and the habits of the two species 
are very similar. * * * It is a very 
handsome bird and in the sun the breast 
of the male appears red and makes him 
a very conspicuous object. The body is 
plump and of about the same size as 
Gambels quail. The female resembles 
closely the Texas quail. The dimensions 
given by Elliot are: Total length, 4^ 
inches; wing, 4}4 inches. Since the di- 
mensions of the Northern bobwhite, as 
given by the same author are: Tota 1 
length about 9^ inches; wing, A T /z 
inches, it would appear that our bobwhite 
is the larger bird. 



Mr. Herbert Brown, writing about this 
bird in Forest and Stream, says in actual 
size the Gambel quail is the larger, al- 
though the masked quail is so plump that 
it appears to overmatch the other bird. 
Mr. Brown predicted that the introduc- 
tion of live-stock into southern Arizona 
bade fair to exterminate the masked bob- 
white by the distribution of its nests and 
eggs by horses and cattle as well as by 
the eating of the cover among which it 
lives. In 1909 he wrote that his predic- 
tion had come true but said the bird ap- 
peared to be getting a good foothold in 
Sonora about seventy miles south of the 
line. 

Elliot says : "From having been taken 
at as lofty an elevation as 6,000 feet it 
would seem that this handsome species 
was hardy and it might be a profitable 
bird to introduce in the Northern States. 

I once heard of several of these birds 
being shot on Long Island, N. Y. The 
sportsman who shot them described the 
birds accurately and I contemplated 
going with him to see if I could secure 
a specimen. He said he had found the 
covey on several occasions and since we 
both had excellent dogs it seemed likely 
we could find the birds. I was busy at 
the time making some illustrations for a 
magazine and shortly after finishing the 
work I left the neighborhood not having 
found the time to go in pursuit of the 
masked bobwhite. I have always believed 
the birds were introduced by one of the 
many clubs which purchased and liber- 
ated quail on the island. 

The Game Conservation Society wishes 
to secure a lot of these birds and several 
members of the society will attempt to 
make them abundant. The society will 
pay a good price for the birds and it is 
to be hoped some of the dealers will se- 
cure them. They no doubt can be saved 
from extinction and made plentiful if 
some breeding stock is procured. 



Subscribe for The Game Breeder, only 
$1 a year. 



! 



THE GAME BREEDER 



145 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



The Technique of Ant Eggs. 

We received a letter from a member 
of the Game Conservation Society ask- 
ing how to separate the ants from the 
eggs when he gathered them, "all mixed 
up together," as the boarding house 
keeper said in response to a request for 
white meat by the one who passed his 
plate: "White meat! dark meat; all 
mixed up together!" he observed as he 
filled the plate. 

An excellent gamekeeper, to whom we 
referred the inquiry, passed and sug- 
gested that the Spratts, from whom he 
said he procured all his ant eggs, might 
know how to subdivide the mixture. 

A letter from the Spratts informs us 
that the ant eggs are all imported but 
that importations have ceased probably 
on account of the war. 

We recently heard that the submarine 
liner Deutschland had brought in valu- 
able dye stuffs and a reader said that 
was all very well but he wanted to know 
when the submarine would bring the 
genuine frankfurters and pilsner. Pos- 
sibly when these valuable products are 
brought over it will be found desirable 
to add ant eggs to the cargo. 

Meantime, as the Spratts suggest, 
there is a good opportunity for an 
American industry. We have plenty of 
eggs. All we need to know is how to 
prepare them for sale. We shall be glad 
to hear from any reader who knows 

the technique. 

♦ ■ 

Editor The Game Breeder : 

In your July issue you have a note on 
ants.' eggs and express the hope that we 
can throw some light on the subject. 

Unfortunately we cannot. 

We have never been able to buy them 
in this country and have always import- 
ed them. Lately the supply from 
Europe has entirely ceased, probably due 
to war conditions. We believe they could 
be collected here in large quantities and 



inexpensively. Surely this would be a 
good opportunity for vacation work on 
the part of students wishing to add to 
their pocket money or help to pay their 
way through college. 

We have no personal knowledge of the 
technique of ant-egg gathering and we 
do not know how the eggs are separated 
from the ants. 

By the way, without having looked into 
the matter, is not the so-called ant-egg of 
commerce the advanced stage of the egg 
or perhaps the pupa? 

Spratt's Patent, Ltd. 

Newark, N. J. 



Quail Breeding. 

One of our California readers says : 
"We are located on ground which would' 
hardly have been selected for quail breed- 
ing and if we are as successful with them 
as now seems likely it should silence all 
skeptics. Our eggs have hatched well 
and so far we are raising ninety-five per 
cent, of the birds. I shall send you a 
story about the quail breeding with some 
photographs." 



We heard recently about a very satis- 
factory sale of a few thousand quail and 
we hope it will not be long before breed- 
ers sell these birds and their eggs as 
freely as they now sell deer, ducks and 
pheasants. The game laws intended to 
protect the vanishing wild game surely 
never were intended to apply to game 
produced by industry and owned by game 
breeders. We doubt if many game offi- 
cers will be inclined in the future to pre- 
vent the sale and shipping of any game 
owned by breeders. If any do, they 
should be reported to The Game Breeder. 
We are always willing to bring cases of 
interference by wardens to the attention 
of State officers and we are pleased to 
observe that the best of them see no ob- 
jection to the sale of game for propaga- 



IH-tc 



>o 



145 



THE GAME BREEDER 



tion by those who own it. The State 
game department surely was not created 
to prevent the increase of game. 



Mallard Mating. 

One of our Iowa readers who has a 
good flock of "genuine wild mallards" 
writes at first he had trouble in mating 
them but in the two years past they have 
become so domesticated that they pay 
little attention to any mating habits. He 
says that the first copy of The Game 
Breeder that he ever saw came to him 
last April and he subscribed for it at 
once. It was then too late to advertise 
but he says "I will have an ad for you 
next spring." 

It is interesting to learn that the wild 
mallards soon became polygamous, and it 
is especially interesting to know that the 
stock is pure. Eggs from such stock will 
sell readily. We regret that our reader 
says his letter is not for publication. We 
always obey such instructions but we are 
quite sure there will be no objection to 
our stating one of the interesting facts 
in the interesting letter. 



Snakes. 



The Game Conservation Society: 

I noticed in a recent issue a story about 
snakes. Now I do not pretend to know 
much about snakes but I have killed a 
lot of blacksnakes, both the water snakes 
and the land variety on our various trout 
streams in this section and almost with- 
out exception I have found traces of 
brook trout; in some cases the fish were 
not yet swallowed and from that to 
nearly digested fish. 

It seems to me that these two snakes 
should be classed with the rattlesnake and 
copperhead as I believe they kill more 
edible fish than all the fishermen in this 
section, I mean in numbers not by 
weight. Oscar S. Weed. 

North Rose, New York. 



Snake and Wild Turkey. 
Perhaps you would be interested in a 
little incident we had with a snake a few 
days ago. My underkeeper was on a 
ladder at the house when he heard a 
young wild turkey, about three weeks 



old, going through the brush at a good 
speed and directly back of it was a 6 foot 
6 inch blacksnake following within twen- 
ty inches. My man got it with a club. 
I did not know a snake could travel so 
fast. 

We are getting a lot of wood cats, 
mink, skunks, hawks and one owl. It 
seems as though we need vermin hunt- 
ers. I have three men on the preserve 
and each carries a gun, or has one within 
easy reach when working. 

Ohio. John R. Gammeter. 



Breeding Wild Turkeys. 

The Portage Heights Game Farms, 
Akron, Ohio, reports the successful 
breeding of wild turkeys as folows; 
"From five hens and one torn turkey we 
got 265 eggs. We have hatched and now 
living 140 turkeys and we have more eggs 
set. We feed exactly as we feed our 
pheasants. The old birds are pinioned 
and they have two acres of field and 
brush. They are driven into a shed every 
night to keep them tame. I am having 
some wild stock trapped to add to my 
flock. I think turkeys are much easier 
to rear than pheasants although they 
require a lot more territory. Our young 
birds range over a half mile and come 
home at night. 

'We have 3,000 pheasants in the field 
and sold 10,000 eggs." 



A Quail Tent. 

Mr. Wm. Mascall, a rancher residing 
near the town of Daryville, Oregon, is 
much interested in the preservation of 
game birds. He found it difficult to 
keep the snow swept clean where he was 
feeding a covey of quail last winter and 
finally conceived the idea of pitching a 
tent, after which time the birds had no 
difficulty in finding the feed at all times, 
and it is said that they came to roost 
there. — The Oregon Sportsman. 



More Quail. 

We recently heard of two sales of 
several thousand live quail for propaga- 
tion. In both cases the transactions were 
entirely legal from our point of view. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



147 



Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, Trout and 
Bass. 

We would advise our readers who 
wish to secure some good shooting and 
fishing to write to the Longwood Valley 
Sportsmen's Club, whose advertisement 
appears on another page. The pictures 
illustrating the article about this club in- 
dicate that the ground should have many 
grouse and woodcock. We are informed 
there are some pheasants and quails and 
that it is proposed to increase the num- 
ber of these and other game birds. There 
are also many deer on the ground in- 
cluded in the preserve. The proposition 
appears especially attractive. The people 
interested are the right kind and full 
particulars will be sent to anyone who 
would like to know more about this at- 
tractive place. Write to The Longwood 
Club, care of Game Breeder, 150 Nassau 
St., New York. 



trouble referred to. We shall be glad to hear 
from game keepers if any of them have en- 
countered this disease or know what it is. The 
matter will be referred by letter to scientists 
who should know the disease if it is at all 
common. — Editor.] 



A New Duck Trouble. 

Mr. C. H. Shaw, of the Arden Game 
Farm, writes : "Do you happen to be 
familiar with a difficulty which we are 
having with some of our young ducks, 
which develops at the age of about three 
weeks with birds which have been doing 
well up to that time? There is a swell- 
ing below the eye, a little forward. Dis- 
section shows the cavity there to be filled 
with a cheesy pus and the same appears 
on the top of the tongue near its base. 
The bird loses its voice ; is finally unable 
to eat and dies apparently of starvation. 
This has occurred with three broods with 
hens and with one artificially brooded 
bunch. The loss from this trouble has 
not been very great, but it appears to 
be communicated from one to another. 
In the beginning it looks as if the bird 
had caught cold ; but it seems to progress 
through the brood after that. I would be 
glad if you would refer this to anyone 
who may have information on the sub- 
ject, in case you are not personally fa- 
miliar with it." 

[We have reared thousands of wild ducks 
but never had any diseases, excepting the well 
known "straddles" or sunstroke, due to the 
heat, and cramDS. due to the young birds 
getting into cold water. We have inspected 
many more thousands of wild ducks on many 
preserves and never observed or heard of the 



What Is an Owl? 

Mr. Montanus of the Middle Island 
Club sends the following: 

A lady selecting a hat at a milliner's 
asked, cautiously: "Is there anything 
about these feathers that might bring me 
into trouble with the Bird Protection So- 
ciety?" "Oh, no, madam," said the mil- 
liner. "But did they not belong to some 
bird?" persisted the lady. "Well, mad- 
am," returned the milliner pleasantly 
"these feathers are the feathers of a 
howl; and the howl, you know, madam, 
seein' as 'ow fond 'e is of mice, is more 
of a cat than a bird." — Philadelphia Star. 

[Referred to the Audubon Society. — Edi- 
tor.] 

♦ 

Shall the Farm Be Purchased. 

Editor The Game Breeder : 

I am about to purchase a farm of 250 
acres in Virginia and before doing so I 
wish to ascertain ifT can raise game on 
it. Do the Virginia laws permit game 
breeding and the sale of game? 

New York. R. Q 

[We are expecting daily to receive a copy 
of the new law enacted and we will announce 
its terms later. It creates the office of game 
commissioner, and we suggest that you write 
to this officer at Richmond, Virginia, also the 
parties whose names and addresses are in- 
closed, who are raising and selling game in 
that State. If the new law does not expressly 
permit the sale of pheasants, turkeys, ducks, 
quail and other game produced by industry, 
we believe it will be safe for you to go right 
ahead and breed and sell all you can. We 
doubt if anyone will ever be arrested again 
anywhere for producing food on a farm. The 
singularity of this old crime does not appeal to 
modern courts, and the tendency everywhere 
is to acquit prisoners charged with food pro- 
ducing. 

Of course, should you purchase the farm it 
will be worth more when all doubt about your 
being able to use it as desired is removed. If 
we find there is danger of game farmers being 
arrested in Virginia, we will let you know and 
suggest another State for your business. — 

Editor.] 

-♦ 

More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 



Ii8 



THE GAME BREEDER 



THE STATE AND THE HAWK. 

Mr. Joseph W. Lippincott, Bethayres, 
Pa., writing about the $1 bounty paid 
for hawks in Ohio in The Guide to Na- 
ture, deplores the fact that thousands of 
valuable hawks must perish and be thus 
lost to communities as mousers and in- 
sect destroyers in order that a few ras- 
cals in their ranks may pay the just pen- 
alty of misdeeds. 

It does seem a pity for the State to 
encourage the destruction of all hawks, 
if such be the case. Some hawks do 
comparatively little damage and undoubt- 
edly they do much good. 

We have no doubt that Mr. Lippincott, 
who says he is a farmer and bird lover, 
will agree with us that it is proper on 
game farms to control the hawks which 
are observed to be eating game. He is 
aware, no doubt, that when game birds 
are made abundant for profit or for sport 
and kept so no hawks are needed to 
destroy insects. Often there are not 
enough insects to fully supply the needs 
of the game and on some preserves it 
has been found necessary to purchase 
some insect food and to supply crissel, 
made by the Spratts, and other animal 
food for the over-abundant game. As to 
the rodents on game farms, the pheas- 
ants, like poultry, will destroy mice and 
a few smart terriers will destroy more 
rodents than a good flock of hawks will 
destroy. The game farmer who pro- 
duces game for profit or for sport should 
decide what is beneficial and what is 
harmful and act accordingly. This he 
usually does. 

We are by no means in favor of the 
total destruction of all of the harmful 
species. We enjoy seeing the high soar- 
ing hawk and do not object to his striking 
a game bird once in a while, but we 
believe he should have to hustle past a 
pretty good gamekeeper to indulge his 
appetite for game, and that is just what 
happens on most game farms and pre- 
serves. 

Mr. Lippincott complains about an 
Ohio law. We believe in his own State 
poison is largely used by the State au- 
thorities to destroy many species of ver- 
min and the State has or had a hawk 
bounty law. We do not pretend to know 



what the laws are at any time in all of 
the States. They are changed too often 
for any one to know what they are. 

♦• 

Hay Fever. 

The Game Breeder does not accept 
every advertisement that comes along. 
Since the magazine is supported by 
members of the Game Conservation So- 
ciety it has been deemed wise to care- 
fully consider an advertisement before 
accepting it. The hay fever cure adver- 
tised in this issue has been indorsed by 
reputable people who have been bene- 
fited by it. It has been submitted to 
authorities, National and State, who have 
decided that it is certainly not injurious. 
Hay fever comes at a bad time of the 
year for prairie-chicken shooters and 
bass-anglers and we would advise the 
afflicted to write and get the numerous 
testimonials which have been given the 
advertiser by those who have been bene- 
fited. 

The discoverer is a good pheasant 
breeder and having given the remedy to 
friends, whose friends in turn wished to 
try it, an endless chain was soon created, 
he says, which required too much postage 
for free distribution. 



Indian Violators in Colorado. 

The year 1914 has been no exception 
as regards the invasion of Colorado by 
the Indians from the Uintah and Ouray 
Reservations in Utah. It has been the 
custom of these Indians to organize a- 
band and cross the borders of our State 
in the vicinity of the Douglas and Pi- 
ceance Creeks, southwest of Rangely in 
Rio Blanco County. These trips are 
usually made in the fall of the year, 
while the deer are coming down from 
their summer haunts to the winter feed- 
ing grounds. 

Early in October the department re- 
ceived advices to the effect that a band 
of one hundred Indians, with wagons, 
tents, and a large number of horses, had 
crossed our border, and were encamped 
in the Douglas Creek district. I reported 
this matter to the Bureau of Indian Af- 
fairs at Washington, and dispatched sev- 
eral wardens to the Indian camp, with 



THE GAME BREEDER 



149 



instructions to persuade them to leave 
Colorado. 

The Indians were located about sixty 
miles southwest of Meeker, and it was 
found that they had killed but two deer. 
Wardens from this department gave the 
Indians forty-eight hours in which to 
leave the State, pitched their own camp 
a few miles distant, and awaited develop- 
ments. On the eve of the second day 
the wardens were happily surprised in 
noting that the Indians had decided to 
leave, and escorted them to the Utah 
border. 

I have received assurances from the 
Bureau of Indian Affairs at Washington 
to the effect that orders have been issued 
to the superintendent in charge at Fort 
Duchesne, Utah, that the Indians be re- 
tained on the reservation and not allowed 
to hunt in Colorado. The Indian super- 
intendent, upon receiving these instruc- 
tions, immediately dispatched Indian po- 
lice who aided our department materially 
in ridding Colorado of these game vio- 
lators. — Report of Game and Fish Com- 
missioners. 

* 

Mining in Two Inches of Ground. 

In a note sent by the du Pont Com- 
pany, .we are informed that lead mining 
on trap shooting grounds is profitable. 
Trap shooters have the same shooting 
grounds year after year, "week in and 
week out," and since the gunners stand 
on the same old line the shot falls on a 
comparatively small area where it can be 
collected. 

The method of securing the lead is 
simple. The ground is skimmed about 
one and a half inches deep. The top soil 
is put in piles and when dry it is sifted 
by screens run by a gasoline engine. 

Twenty-three tons of lead were pro- 
cured in front of the traps of the du 
Pont Gun Club. 



movement discussed and added that The 
Game Breeder was always mentioned in 
the conversation which occurred. 

The words "more game" are used to 
end letters. "Yours for more game" 
started by somebody. 



"MORE!" 

More game ; more fish ; fewer game 
laws are now common and oft-repeated 
words from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 

A traveler from the West coast called 
recently on The Game Breeder and said 
that everywhere he went he heard the 
more game idea and the more game 



"More" Frankfurters. 

Dyes are important, of course, but how 
far behind the Deutschland is the unter- 
seeboot bearing the genuine frankfurters 
and the tanks of Pilsner? 



— ♦ 

OUTINGS AND INNINGS. 

Why are Pheasants like gate-posts? 
Because they propagate. 

♦ 

Where Dog Was Useful. 

"Why don't you get rid of that dog, 
son? He is useless and has no spirit." 
"He's a big help to me in the junk busi- 
ness, dad. Comes home early every day 
with a kettle tied to his tail." — Louis- 
ville Courier Journal. 



Wildcat in Hunters' Lodge. 

At Philipsburg, Pa., when members of 
the Crystal Springs Hunting Club visited 
their quarters in the Clearfield County 
woods recently they were confronted by 
a big wildcat. When it showed fight it 
was quickly despatched. It weighed 
nearly fifty pounds and was more than 
four feet long. 

Who Was He? 

"Father," said a boy of twelve, "who 
was Shylock?" 

"What!" exclaimed his father, "have 
I sent you to Sunday School for the past 
six or seven years, only to have you ask 
me who Shylock was? Shame on you! 
Get your Bible and find out this minute !" 
Western Farm Life. 



A couple of little boys were discussing 
matters personal to themselves. One of 
them asked: 

"Do you say your prayers in the morn- 
ing or at night?" 

"At night, of course," said the other. 
"Anybody can take care of himself in 
the daytime!" 



150 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T**5 Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, AUGUST, 1916. 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $i 25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotio, Treasurer, 

J. C Huntington, Se< retary. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 

"The State owns the game." — Game 
Protectionist. 
Does the State own the snakes ? 



game by ambush or by a stealthy ap- 
proach. We hope the story about the 
attempt of the blacksnake to run down 
a wild turkey will prompt other readers 
to contribute to our snake lore. 



Ever since Warren Leach, an Illinois 
game breeder, pointed out that the State 
did not own his buffaloes, elk, deer, wild 
geese and other game, there seems to 
have been a decided doubt everywhere 
if the State owns all of the game. Many 
game farmers now show more game per 
acre than the State ever dreamed of and 
the States wisely are permitting the 
owners of game to sell it. "More sales, 
more game," of course. 



AN INTERESTING REPORT. 

We are especially interested in the re- 
ports from the Portage Heights Game 
Farm, published in this issue. 

The proprietor wrote some time ago 
that he had expended about ten thousand 
dollars on game protection, "foolishly as 
I see it now. Your paper opened my 
eyes." 

It must be gratifying to the eye to ob- 
serve 3,000 pheasants and a big lot of 
wild turkeys on a farm where a few 
years ago there were only game law re- 
strictions which prevented the owner 
from having any game. We hope before 
long to hear of the sale of a few thou- 
sand quail from this interesting place. 
Easily they can be bred wild in the fields 
and woods now that the "woods-cats," 
snakes and other vermin are vanishing 
before an armed force of three guns. 

Three thousand quail easily will sell 
for $5,000. The force now on the" ground 
can produce them since if "the keepers 
look after the vermin the game will look 
after itself," as Owen Jones said about 
the gray partridges. 



^»» 



"MORE" SNAKES. 

The more game we have the more 
snakes will surely be destroyed, no matter 
who owns them. Mr. Williams did a 
public service when he sent the article, 
"Snakes and Snakes," which was pub- 
lished in The Game Breeder for June. 

Last, month we heard about what the 
snakes do in North Carolina ; in this issue 
breeders in New York and Ohio tell us 
about their (?) snakes. The' pursuit of 
a young wild turkey by a snake is espe- 
cially interesting and timely now that the 
wild turkeys are becoming abundant as 
a sporting bird. We have always known 
that the snake was speedy but in most 
cases we observed that he secured his 



OUR QUAILS OR PARTRIDGES. 

We are more and more convinced not 
alone from experiments made by the 
editor of The Game Breeder but also 
from the practical results obtained _ by a 
large number of quail clubs and inter- 
ested preserve owners that the best 
method of breeding quail or partridges 
for sport is to breed the birds in a wild 
state in protected fields which have been 
made especially safe and attractive. The 
partridges of the old world have been 
made tremendously abundant in many 
places by the methods we advise and 
these birds are similar in their breeding 
habits to our American species. 

Wild birds, undoubtedly, produce the 
healthiest offspring just as wild trout and 
other fishes do. The young birds in the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



151 



care of their natural parents quickly 
learn to be on their guard against natural 
enemies and they are taught to seek the 
natural foods which vary with the sea- 
sons. Hand-reared quail are without ex- 
perience when they are liberated and, 
since the natural enemies of game are 
far more abundant in America than they 
are in countries where the game is prop- 
erly looked after, and where vermin is 
closely controlled, the birds reared in 
captivity often fall an easy prey to the 
natural enemies. 

A knowledge of hand-rearing is valu- 
able since it is desirable to save the eggs 
from nests which have been exposed by 
farm machinery and from nests in ex- 
posed situations. It should be regarded 
only as a supplemental work; the main 
effort should be to produce the birds 
abundantly in every field. It has been 
found an easy and inexpensive matter to 
make the birds as abundant as they 
should be without resort to any artificial 
methods. The hand rearing of pheasants 
and wild ducks is highly desirable in 
America as it has been found to be in the 
older countries where large numbers of 
birds are produced on comparatively 
small areas both for sport and for profit. 

We should follow the methods of the 
older countries in the handling of our 
quail or partridges, and these methods 
are almost exclusively wild breeding 
methods both in England and on the Con- 
tinent of Europe. 

The Game Conservation Society will 
publish, early in the fall, a practical 
book on quail breeding for sport and for 
profit. The results obtained on many 
farms in America will be fully described 
and illustrated with diagrams showing 
how to make the fields safe and attrac- 
tive. There will be a chapter on hand 
rearing, giving the experience of many 
American breeders who have been suc- 
cessful in rearing quail in captivity and 
suggestions as to the places where sue 
tame game should be liberated. 

We have about an hundred members 
who are hand-rearing quail or who have 
done so successfully — that is to say, they 
have reared a few, and in some cases a 
few hundred quail. One of these breed- 



ers says the hand-reared quail cannot be 
sold for less than $25 per dozen. It is 
significant that we have many more hun- 
dreds of members who are breeding 
quail in a wild state and that they safely 
shoot a few hundred birds the first sea- 
son and often thousands of quail are shot 
every season thereafter. These are quail 
which would have been eaten by snakes, 
foxes, hawks, skunks, crows, et al., had 
not the laws permitted the owners of the 
birds to breed them and to shoot them. 
Shooting in America as elsewhere can be 
made to produce a big lot of game every 
season — enough for all of the people to 
have quail on their tables. 



MORE WATER. 

The more we think about the subject 
the more we are convinced that the wild 
ducks need "more" water in many States 
far more than they need "more" game 
laws. The draining of highly desirable 
breeding grounds still goes on. Railways 
are constructed through the compara- 
tively limited areas where the canvasback 
and the other desirable wild fowl nested 
in great abundance. A little illegal shoot- 
ing on the nest grounds and the destruc- 
tion by abundant cats and other vermin 
precedes the draining which, of course, 
puts an end to the wild fowl in the 
neighborhood. Let us have "more water" 
and "fewer game laws." 

It has always seemed strange that 
there should be no objection to a land 
owner draining his marshes or to the 
State or province running big ditches 
through the duck breeding grounds and 
putting an end to the game when there 
is opposition to the saving of some of 
the marshes for profitable wild duck 
breeding. Fortunately the objection is 
vanishing rapidly and the sportsmen who 
do nothing but secure more laws are be- 
ginning to realize that it is a good idea to 
have "more game" and that a big lot of 
wild ducks will fly out from marshes 
which are not drained where large num- 
bers are bred for sport and for profit. 
It. is highly important to save some of 
the marshes and to keep them quiet dur- 
ing the breeding season. 






152 



THE GAME BREEDER 



GIVE THE QUAIL AND GROUSE 
A CHANCE. 

We consented reluctantly or perhaps 
the situation would be better stated by 
saying that we took our medicine, when 
the amendments proposed to reform the 
absurd Bayne law were cut down so as 
to only permit game breeders to breed 
pheasants, ducks and deer. The absurd- 
ity of only permitting breeders to look 
after the species which least need their 
attention and of threatening them with a 
jail sentence if they should dare to look 
after our splendid indigenous birds was 
so evident that we were indignant at the 
idea of a compromise. 

The absurd idea advanced in the orig- 
inal bill was that all birds and even rab- 
bits should be "protected" at all times in 
so far as making it worth while for any 
one to look after them was concerned. 
The amendments which we desired 
made it legal to look after any species 
profitably. When the chairman of the 
Senate Committee, Senator Franklin D. 
Roosevelt, suggested to the writer that 
if the breeders be permitted to breed the 
mallards, ducks and deer, it would not 
be long before other species could be 
added to the list and that the compro- 
mise would make the passage of the bill 
easier we believed, as he did, that it 
would not be long before the legislature 
could be induced to give the quail, 
grouse, wild turkeys and other desirable 
game the same chance for a rapid in- 
crease in numbers as was given to mal- 
lards, black ducks, pheasants and deer. 
The time has now arrived. 

We wish to see the laws amended so 
as to make it legal to profitably produce 
grouse, quail, wild turkeys and any other 
species of game. It seems absurd to 
think that it may take a year or two for 
this common sense idea to prevail in 
New York. We are pleased to observe 
that other States already have accepted 
the idea and that in many States it no 
longer is a criminal offense to produce 
any species of food on a farm. 

Our plans for the future include the 
restoration of quail on toast, broiled teal, 
roast wild turkey and many other desir- 
able dishes, and we shall never cease to 
demand, for game breeders, the right to 



produce profitably and abundantly the 
birds which most need their attention. 

We have been willing to consent to a 
certain amount of license and tag "fool- 
ishness," as Mr. Talbot calls the licensing 
of breeders and the tagging of game. 
We insist, however, that the charge for 
the permits should be nominal, as it is in 
many States or nothing as it is in Massa- 
chusetts, and that the charge for the 
identification tags should not be more 
than a few cents for a handful (as the 
charge for trout tags recently was made 
in New York) and not 5 cents for each 
tag. As we have pointed out a reason- 
able tagging system (the State furnish- 
ing the tags to reputable breeders at the 
cost of production) is in a way beneficial 
to the breeders since it is a safeguard 
against the theft and illegal sale of their 
game by poachers. 

The first thing of importance on our 
program is the amendment of the laws 
in all States, where amendments still are 
necessary, so as to permit the profitable 
breeding of all species. The entire non- 
sense in the Bayne bill should have been 
eliminated at the time when a good part 
of it was knocked out by the combined 
efforts of the Hotel Men's Associations, 
the game dealers, the game breeders and 
a lot of good sportsmen, who worked 
harmoniously and with some success as 
is evidenced by the many thousands of 
pheasants and ducks which now are 
reared in New York and in other States 
which copied the New York law. 



Will It Come to This? 

The days of the hunting dog are num- 
bered. There will, no doubt, be a move- 
ment started to wipe the hunting dog 
off the map. Farmers who have hereto- 
fore been driven to distraction by dogs 
running their stock will have an oppor- 
tunity at the next election to vote 
against the nuisance. — Silverton Appeal 

Oregon. 

♦ — 

Wild Turkeys in the South. 

Mr. Edmond A. Mcllhenny in his ex 
cellent book, "The Wild Turkey and Its 
Hunting," says: "There are thousands 
of acres in the South which once were 



THE GAME BREEDER 



15a 



cultivated, but which are now aband- 
oned and growing up with timbers, brush 
and grass. Such country affords splen- 
did opportunity for the rearing and per- 
petuation of the wild turkey. These 
lands are vastly superior for this pur- 
pose than are the solid primeval forests, 
inasmuch as they afford a great variety 
of summer food, such as green, tender 
herbage, berries of many kind, grass- 
hoppers by the million, and other insects 
in which the turkeys delight. Such a 
country also affords good nesting re- 
treats, with briar-patches and straw 
where the nest may be safely hidden, 
and where the young birds may secure 
safe hiding places from animals and 
birds of prey; but alas! at present not 
from trappers, baiters, and pot hunters. 
Check these and the abandoned planta- 
tions of the South would soon be alive 
with turkeys," 

The quail, or partridge, as they call 
bobwhite in the South, also can be made 
to swarm on the places Mr. Mclllhenny 
describes provided gamekeepers be em- 
ployed to control the natural enemies of 
the grouse as well as the trappers, bait- 
ers and pot hunters referred to by Mr. 
Mcllhenny. I have seen the quail so 
abundant on such places that the dogs 
pointed a second covey often before we 
reached the scattered birds of the first 
covey. I have seen places where it is 
perfectly safe to shoot thousands of 
quail and many turkeys every season. 
If the laws be amended so as to permit 
sportsmen of small means to rent the 
shooting on such places and sell some of 
the game to help pay expenses thousands 
of guns soon can have fine shooting in 
places where now there is none and at 
very small expense. 

The sale of some of the game at pres- 
ent prices would pay all the expenses, I 
am sure and soon double the value of the 
lands used for game. 



Fur Farming, written and published 
by A. R. Harding. Price, 60 cents. 

Hunting Dogs. By Oliver Hartley* 
A. R. Harding Publishing Co. Price,. 
60 cents. 

These little books should interest many 
readers of The Game Breeder. The 
Science of Trapping describes the prac- 
tical methods for capturing fur-bearing 
animals, the control of many of which is 
deemed necessary and advisable on game 
farms and preserves. 

Fox Trapping is important since the 
fox is one of the worst enemies of game 
and it is a most difficult animal to con- 
trol unless one knows how. 

Fur Farming contains much practical 
information about the habits of the fur- 
bearers and tells how to trap them. 

Hunting Dogs describes the handling 
of game dogs and the training and man- 
agement of dogs used for night hunt- 
ing as well as for daylight sport. 



The Usual Results. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

The small advertisement I placed in 
your most valuable paper sold all my 
pheasants old and young that I wished 
to dispose of. If I had hundreds more 
ring-necks I could have sold them all. 
Mrs. S. S. Hirsch. 

Illinois. 



Book Reviews. 

The Science of Trapping, by E. Kreps. 
Revised edition. A. R. Harding pub- 
lisher. Price, 60 cents. 

Fox Trapping, edited and published by 
A. R. Hardin?. Price 60 cents. 



I have had some offers of a dollar each 
for wild eggs through the Game Breeder,, 
but I did not supply them as it would 
pay me better, with the number of birds 
I have, to set all the eggs; the grown 
birds bring from twenty to twenty-five 
dollars. This is not an exorbitant price 
at all, for the wild poults are certainly 
more difficult to raise than those of do- 
mestic turkeys. 

♦ 

No wonder the game vanishes. Per- 
mits are issued for a dollar for every 
one to destroy it. Permits are refused 
to those who would take a few birds 
alive in order to breed them and multiply 
their numbers. • 



154 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Champion 

Mississippi Sport 

at Stud, Fee $30^P 

Breed to a real bird dog with 
brains, ambition and the best of 
blood lines. 

R. H. SIDWAY 

147-153 W. Mohawk Street 
Buffalo, N. Y. 




America's 

Pioneer 

Dog Remedies 



BOOK ON 

DOG DISEASES 
And How to Feed 

Mailed free to any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Inc. 
118 West 31st Street, New York 




FISHEL'S FRANK 



The Best in 
Pointers 

Puppies, Broken Dogs 

and Brood Bitches, by 

Champion Comanche 

Frank, Fishel's Frank 

and Champion Nicholas 

R. 

Write me your wants, please. 

U. R. FISHEL 
Box 35 HOPE, IND. 



The Amateur Trainer 

By Ed. F. Haberlein 

A practical trainer of over 30 years' experience, whose 
system is up to date and stands nneqoaled. 

New Edition Just Oat. Illustrated. 
A tlain, practical and concise, yet thorough guide 
in the art of framing, handling and the correcting 
of faults of the bird doj subservient to the gun 
afield. Written especially for the novice, but 
equally valuable to the experienced handler. By 
following the instructions plainly given, every 
shooter possessed of a little common sense and 
patience can train his own dogs to perfection. 
Paper cover, $1.00; best full cloth binding and gold 
embossed, $1.50. Address 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 



Membership in Private Hunting and Fishing Preserve 

The Longwood Valley Sportsmen's Club, Controlling the Fishing and 
Hunting Preserve of the late U. S. Senator John Kean in Upper Longwood 
Valley, Northern New Jersey, invites inquiries from Sportsmen for Mem- 
bership, which is both limited and exclusive. Deer, Pheasants, Quail, 
Partridge Abundant; also Brook, Rainbow and Brown Trout, Large and. 
Small Mouth Bass in Lakes and Streams. Two hours by auto from New 
York. 
Address LONGWOOD VALLEY SPORTSMEN'S CLUB, care The Game Breeder, 

150 Nassau Street, New York City 



THE GAME BREEDER 



155 



Good Quail Shooting Near New York 

1 have under lease a most desirable Shooting area near New York City. 
The Quail shooting now is very good and there are some Ruffed Grouse, Rabbits 
etc. This shooting can be made much better than it is provided more attention 
be paid to the cats and other vermin. I wish to secure two or three guns to 
share the expense. The ground is well known to the Editor of the Game Breeder 
and I refer to him with his permission. For further particulars, address 



DESIRABLE, 



Care 
of 



The Game Breeder, 



150 Nassau Street, 
NEW YORK. 



Game Breeders' Supplies 

WIRE-COOPS-TRAPS 

Egg Turners, fgg Boxes for Shipping, Etc. 



-AND" 



all Appliances for Game farms and Preserves 

We have a new Pheasant Egg Box 
especially suitable for State Game 
Departments and Game Farms which 
ship large numbers of eggs in small 
quantities. 

Write for Prices and Information. 



F, T. OAKES 



ROOM 622, 
THE SUN BUILDING, NEW YORK 




This Kit was suggested by the well known 
author and scout master, Edward Cave. It is 
compact, light in weight, inexpensive and 
serviceable. The mess-kit consists of: — 

Fry-pan, Bread-pan, Suspension Bail, Cooking Pot, 

Tin Plate, Tin Cup, Carving Knife, Knife Sheath, 

Table Fork, Teaspoon, Tablespoon and Khaki Bag. 

Delivered free in the U.S. A $1.35 

Cave Hiker's Packsack 

The best pack to carry medium weight loads. 
There are six pockets inside and straps without 
for attaching blanket. Big enough for an over- 
night equipment, but weighs only one pound. 

Cave Hiker's Packsack, delivered, $1.75 
"Pocahontas" Squaw Bag, delivered, 1.25 

Sporting Goods Catalog 

Hundreds of articles for the Camper, 
Explorer, Fisherman and Hunter are de- 
scribed in our "Sportsman's Handbook" 
and catalog. There are 336 pages, in- 
cluding game pictures and " talks " by 
Powhatan Robinson, telling how, when 
and where to Camp, Fish and Hunt and 
many "kinks" in wildcraft. 
This book sent free if you mention No. 266. 

NewYorkSporting Goods Coj 

15 and 17 Warren St.,NewYork. 




Shooting Clubs and Game Farms 

The Game Breeder has assisted in the formation of many shooting clubs and game 
farms. We are preparing a booklet on this subject, containing testimonials. Those who 
desire information on either subject, or information about the new Game Breeders' laws, 
are requested to write to us. The service is free to those who state that they deal with 
advertisers in The Game Breeder and who are contributing members of The Game Con- 
servation Society or subscribers to The Game Breeder. Letters should be addressed to the 

Information Department of THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, New York 



156 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No adveriisemeut accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment; 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New Tork City 



LIVE GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE PHOENIX FOWL 
Eggs for sale; several varieties. S V. REEVES, 114 
E. Park Ave., Haddonfield, N. J. 



„ * WANTED, PHEASANTS. 

FOR FALL DELIVERY TWO THOUSAND FULL 
winged ring neck pheasants, must be healthy, safe 
delivery guaranteed. State price and particulars. 
A, East Hampton P. O., Long Island, New York. 



QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL. DEER AND 
r.,1 t ,r her anima ' s ^ee display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 



CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now— the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest ana largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country Black and White 
Swans. Wild Ducks, etc , for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 



WILD TURKEY'S— For prices see display advertisement 
tn this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. dot) 

FOR SALE -BUFFALO AND ELK IN CAR LOAD 
lots or single. Deer, Antelope, Beaver, Mink, Mountain 
Lion, Pheasants and Game Birds. Eggs in season. 
KENDRICK PHEASANTRIES, Coronado Building, 
Denver, Colorado. 7.76 

PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW, 
ing prices: Mallards, $3.00 per pair. Pintails, $2.50 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $4.00 per pair. Blue Wii g Teal, 
$300 per pair. Al.=o relheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for propa- 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN, 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 



SAN LORENZO GAME FARM — BREEDER OF 
all kinds of pheasants; eggs in season; also birds 
for sale at all times Visitors welcome. Write for 
price list. Mrs S. MATTHIESSEN, San Lorenzo, 
Alameda Co., California. y-rb 



CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATED PHEASANT BREED- 
ERS. Pheasants. Quail. Mallard price list. FRED D. 
HOYT, Hayward, Cal. 



GAME EGGS 



FIRST PRIZE WINNING RINGNECK PHEASANTS. 
Place your orders for stock and eggs now, also several 
varieties of bantams and hares. Prices reasonable. 
CHAS. G. BOLTON, Zieglerville, Penn. 



PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE; STRICTLY FRFSH 
and fertile. I am now booking orders for string and 
summer. Amherst, Golden, Silver. GRAY PHEAS- 
ANTRIES, Ward Street, Orange, New Jersey. 

LIVE MALLARD DECOYS THAT BRING THE 
ducks in swarms. Free handy staking apparatus and 
convenient carrying crate with order. 10% discount if you 
place order before September 1st. Write for testimonials, 
photos and prices. CLYDE B. TERRELL, Wisconsin 
Licensed State Mallard Farm, Dept. P, Oshkosh, Wis. 



GAME BIRD* WANTED 



WANTED— MONGOLIAN AND R1NGNECK PHEAS- 
ANTS and deer for breeding. Also cub bear. Give 
description and prices. CLARE WILLARD, Allegany. 
\'ew York. 

WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX, 
Pied Peafowl Soemmerring, Cheer, Hcki and German 
Peacock Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt Sterling. Ky. 

DEER WANTED -Wanted, one pair of adult fallow deer. 
State price. A C. C, care of The Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



GAMEKEEPERS 



SITUATION WANTED-HEAD GAMEKEEPER OR 
Superintendent of large estate or game preserve. Very 
capable man to show sport. Thoroughly experienced 
rearing pheasants, partridge, quail and wild ducks. 
Management of incubators hatching pheasant and duck 
eggs. Also breeding, training and handling high class 
shooting dogs. Excellent trapper, competent manager. 
Reference present employer. GAMEKEEPER, 157 East 
69th St., New York. 

GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION. UNDER- 
stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 
this country. Address M. F.. care of The Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau Street, New York. 



WANTED-SITUATION 
As Superintendent or Manager on a game farm or 
preserve. Experienced in game and poultry breed'ng. 
Good reason for desiring change of location. Would 
take an interest in a game farm to breed game com- 
mercially. Address C. McM., office of The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York City. 



WANTED SITUATION, GAMEKEEPER— EXCEL- 

lent references. Pheasants, ducks, dog breaking. Good 
reason for leaving present situation. P. E. L., care 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 



GAME KEEPER 
WANTS SITUATION-SKILLFUL PHEASANT 
an 1 wild duck breeder. Best of references and good 
reason for wishing to leave present situation. Write 
for copies of recommendations. P. R. T., care 
Game Breeder, 150 .Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



i 



THE GAME BREEDER 



157 



WANTED SITUATION AS SUPERINTENDENT OF 
game farm or preserve. American, with experience in 
rearing wild mallards and pheasants for stocking or shoot- 
ing. A man thoroughly able to take all responsibility, with 
best references in the country. AMERICAN, care of 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 

HEAD KEEPER WANTS POSITION ON' SHOO V- 
ing preserve. Understands breeding of pheasants, wild 
ducks, quail, etc., and all duties of head keeper. Best of 
references from former American employers. Good reason 
for desiring a change. J. E. J., care Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau .' t., New York. 

SITUATION WANTED, GAME KEEPER— EXPERI- 
enced, understands thoroughly the care of game, age 21, 
nationality English. References. B. R., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 



REAL ESTATE 



GAME BREEDING FARM WANTED 
Wanted to purchase or rent a small place in one 
of the Eastern States where game breeding is legal. 
A small farm with a pond and stream is desired. 
State price and location. M. A. C, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



BUNGALOW FOR SALE OR RENT 

HAVE WELL BUILT BUNGALOW IV THE MOUN- 
tainsof Ulster Co., N.Y.,2h:>ursfrom N.Y. City and half- 
hour from Poughkeepsie. Bungalow contains 6 rooms, 
good artesian well and first-class outbuildings. Will rent 
furnished or unfurnished for the comingsummer. Address 
E. DAYTON, 26 Bergen Ave., Jersey Ciiy, N. J. 



FOODS 



WILD DUCKS' NATURAL FOODS Will attract 
them, these foods collected, examinations made, plant- 
ings planned and superintended. Write for free infor- 
mation. CLYDE B TERRELL, Specialist on the Natural 
F-jods of Wild Ducks, Dept. Pi, Oshkosh, Wis. 

MEAL WORMS FOR BIRDS, FOR SALE BY THE 

hundred or in large quantities. 25c. per hundred. Write 
for prices for larger lots. WM. STOFKREGN, 124-126 
4th Ave.. New York City. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



REARING PHEASANTS IN SMALL ENCLOSURES. 
Price, 20 Cents. It contains nothing that has not been 
thoroughly and successfully tried out in actual practice 
S. V. REEVES. Haddonfield, N. J. 



SEND 25 CENTS FOR INFORMATION AND PRICE 
list of the most profitable furbearing animal, the Black 
Siberian Hare. SIBERIAN HARE CO., Hamilton, 
Canada. 



AIREDALE PUPPIES, Br ST BREEDING, MANY 
champions in pedigree. Also Golden Pheasant Eggs. 
MRS. A. E. THOMPSON, Willian sburg, Va. 



WANTED— BIRD DOGS FOR TRAINING. TWENTY- 
seven years' experience in training Grouse Dogs. Good 
references. Terms reasonable, satisfaction guaranteed. 
A. E SEIDEL, Danville, Pa, 



BROOK TROUT HATCHERY FOR SALE— THOU- 
sands trout in ponds. Physical conditions perfect. 
Dwelling, 11 acres Worth $12,000.00. Make offer. 
Address XXX, Game Breeder. 



ORDER NOW FOR FALL DELIVERY, 5 VARIETIES 
of Pheasants, Wild Mallards, Fancy Ducks, Wild Geese, 
Quail ; 14 varieties of Standard Poultry, including Turkeys. 
Stamp for inquiry. TOLLAND FISH & GAME ASS'N, 
Riverton, Conn 

CROW CALL 
should help to kill off our worst game enemy. A Crow 
Call will help you get some excellent shots and do worlds of 
good. Price 65c. A. V. LINDQUIST, Alexandria, Minn. 



CALIFORNIA VALLEY QUAIL IN EXCHANGE FOR 
Bob-whites, bird for bird Eegs for sale Ring Neck 
Pheasan's, $2 50 per 15. Quail, $2.00 per 15. Kggs shipped 
on receipt of price Fertility guaranteed. Address 
JOSEPH KETCHUM, 303 17th Street, Pacific Grove, Calif. 



DOGS 



NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
English bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds, American fox- 
hounds, lion, cat, deer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. All 
trained. Shipped on trial. Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded Purchaser to decide. Fifty page hghly 
illustrated catalogue, 5c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 



THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
oflerforsale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds 
wolf and deer nounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var, 
mint and rabbit hounds, beai and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixiy page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 



GENUINE BLACK SILVER FOX PUPS FOR SALE. 

We board your foxes, guarantee them or build your 
ranch for you. for information write New Hampshire 
McNeill Black Silver Fox Co., or R J. McNeill, PENA- 
COOK, New Hampshire 

FOR SALE— GREAT DANE TWO YEARS OLD. 
Handsome animal, excellent watchdog. MRS. S. S. 
HIRSCH, 45th Place, Lyons, 111. 




INDEPENDENCE, KflNSflST 




A SPEEDY RELIEF TO HAY-FEVER SUFFERERS 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



158 



THE GAME BREEDER 



GAME BIRDS 

POR PROPAGATING PURPOSES 

Genuine Wild Mallards, Black Duck, Green-wing and Blue- 
wing Teal, Pintails, Gadwalls, Shovellers, Wood Duck, Widgeon, 
Red- heads, Blue-bills, also a few pairs of extra choice Canvas-backs 
and Ring-bills; Canadian, Greater and Lesser Snow, Ross, Brant, 
Hutchins, Cackling and Blue Geese, supplied for propagating 
purposes. Finest quality in the country. 

Golden, Silver, Amherst, Reeves Pheasants at reasonable prices. 
I also am booking orders for ring-neck Pheasants reared on my 
preserve for delivery in early fall. 

I also have rare land and waterfowl from all parts of the world. 
Prices quoted for the asking. 

JOHN HEYWOOD, Gardner, Mass. 

Farms for the Propagation of Wild Fowl. 



WILD DUCKS 
MUST EAT 

You can attract wild ducks and 
other game, and propagate game and 
fish more successfully, and at less 
expense, by making natural feeding 
grounds. 

I develop natural feeding grounds 
for game and fish on your preserve. 

Planting material including Sago 
Pondweed, Wild Rice, Wild Celery, 
Wapato and many others is properly 
collected and shipped in season with 
complete planting plans and instruc- 
tions. 

Write for free booklet," Wild Duck Foods" 

CLYDE B. TERRELL 

Specialist on Natural Game and Fish Foods 
Dept. P. OSHKOSH, WIS. 



Portage Heights Game Farms 

2000 Acres 
AKRON, OHIO 



Wild Turkeys 
Ringnecked Pheasants 



To successfully rear Wild Turkeys 

and Pheasants use 

Germicide— #1.00 per gallon. 



For Birds, Eggs or Germicide 
Address 

J. R. GAMMETER, 

Portage Heights Game Farms, North Portage Path 

AKRON, OHIO 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.'* 



THE GAME BREEDER 



159 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

A Practical Book on the Breeding of Wild Fowl 
for Sport and for Profit 

With Numerous Illustrations. 

Contains chapters on the Preservation of Snipe and Woodcock. 

Many readers of the Game Breeder have bred thousands of Wild Ducks 
by following the instructions in this book. 



DUCK BREEDING IS PROFITABLE. 



PRICE, $1.50; Special Signed Edition, $2.00. 



THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, New York 



IF you desire birds for shooting or 
to place in their aviaries for rear- 
ing" next year, now is the time to 
buy. Do not wait until midwinter 
and then have the prices advance on 
you like they did last year. 

We can make immediate delivery 
on Silver, Golden, Ringneck, Lady 
Amherst, Reeves, Elliott, Mongolian, 
Swinhoe, Versicolor, Impeyan, Man- 
churian Eared, Peacock, Melanotus 
and Tragopan Cabot Pheasants. We 
can also furnish either mature or young 
Wild Turkeys. Also pure Wild Mal- 
lards. Also Japanese Silkies and 
Longtails, Blue.White, Pied, Japanned 
and Specifier Peafowl, as well as nu- 
merous varieties of fancy and other 
ducks. 

Send thirty cents in stamps for 
colortype catalogue of pheas- 
ants and how to rear. . . . 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 



Wild Duck Foods 

SAGO POND WEED AND OTHERS 

If you wish to grow a wild duck food, 
that will grow anywhere except in salt 
water, and the very best duck food 
known, plant Sago Pond Weed, roots or 
seed. We will refer you to people who 
are growing it abundantly, and they 
will tell you how it has improved their 
shooting. Sago is what has held the 
ducks, geese and swans in Currituck for 
the past 90 years, where they have been 
shot at more than any other place in 
America. 

We also ship wild celery roots and 
seeds. Chara, Widgeon grass roots, Red 
head grass and Wild rice roots. We will 
not ship Wild rice seed. 

JASPER B. WHITE 

WATERLILY, CURRITUCK SOUND, N. C. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters : "Yours for More Game."" 



160 THE GAME BREEDER 



PHEASANTS, DUCKS AND EGGS 

Deer And Other Live Game 

FOR SALE, a superb lot of Golden, Silver and Amherst pheasants just 
right for breeding this spring and summer. 

I am now booking orders for eggs of the following varieties: Mon- 
golian, Ringueck, Chinese, Golden, Silver, Amherst and Reeves. 

Wood Duck, Mallard and Gray Call Duck eggs. 

All the eggs I ship are guaranteed to be from non-related, pure 
bred, strong, healthy birds, correctly mated; all eggs are guaranteed not to 
be over three days old when they leave my farm. 

I also manufacture a full line of special foods for the successful raising 
of young pheasants and wild water fowl, also for feeding the old birds 
all the year 'round ; write for prices. 

WALLACE EVANS GAME FARM, ST. CHARLES, ILL. 

Largest and most successful breeders of pheasants, 
wild water fowl, deer, etc., in the world. 



STONY LONESOME GAME FARM 

Mallard Ducks and 
Mongolian Pheasants 

We offer for immediate delivery (limited number) of 

Mallard Ducks and Mongolian Pheasants 

and will take orders for eggs, delivery in the spring. 

ADDRESS 

129 Front Street, New York City, 

or JOHN FOSTER, West Hartland, Connecticut 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Gams Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 




Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
-\^ °^ ->-=*^ : Partridges and Pheasants. 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 






W- 


Ji . smmnM m ^^r % __ 


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1 


HHVB^ ' ..^UflH - 



Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Royal Swans of England. 1 have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES. PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have 60 acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only (iO miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia. 



Department V. 



WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 



r 



n 




The Feeding of Sporting Dogs 

Every Gamekeeper knows and appreciates the difficulty of bringing the dogs 
up to " top notch '' in the matter of health, especially as the sporting season 
hoves in sight. Sporting dogs have to undertake difficult and exacting work 
necessitating a great expenditure of strength and vitality. Hence their feeding 
demands experience, judgment and consideration in selecting the best foods to 
sustain them and the exclusive use of those foods only. 

Sporting Dogs can be made capable of long-sustained effort by liberally 
feeding them with 

SPRATT'S 
DOG CAKES 

which are now recognized in all sporting circles as the Food par excellence 
for keeping dogs up to standard fitness. Dogs fed on Spratt's Biscuits 
work better, behave better, live longer and are more reliable than those 
trained on any other foods. 



Spratt's Dog Cakes prevent dogs suffering from overstrain by providing 

A RESERVE STOCK OF VITALITY 

— just what so many dogs lack at the time when they need it most 



ARE YOU FEEDING YOUR DOGS ON SPRATT'S? 

If you are not, and wish to prove their value in a practical way, we will send you samples free. 



" Dog Culture" mailed on receipt of 2c. stamp. " Pheasant Culture," price 25c 

" Poultry Culture," 10c. 

SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

NEWARK, N.J. ; SAN FRANCISCO; ST. LOUIS; CLEVELAND; MONTREAL 

1U —J 



MAR 12 W* 




$>12° P er Y e ar 

iiiiiiiiii iiiii iiiiiiiiiiiniii iinrrmr 




■Single Copies 10$. 




T H Er 



AH E 5B 





VOL. IX. 



SEPTEMBER, 1916 




The- Object op this Magazine- is 
to Make- North America the- 5iggest 
Game Producing Country in the World 



No. 6 







THE PROPAGATION OF WILD BIRDS 

By HERBERT K. JOB 

This book describes in detail the breeding and management 
of Pheasants, Quail, Wild Fowl and other Game Birds. It 
is illustrated with many remarkable photographs of the game 
which add much to the value of the book. Every game 
breeder and sportsman should own a copy of this excellent book. 



Price, : : $2.00 



THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 



The Wild Turkey and Its Hunting. 

This is a valuable, interesting and well illustrated 
book, written by E. A Mcllhenny, who is well quali- 
fied by reason of a long experience with Wild Turkeys 
to write about the biggest game bird in the world. 
Mr. Mcllhenny says there are thousands of acres 
which once were cultivated but which are now 
abandoned and growing wp with timber, brush and 
grass Such country affords splendid opportunity 
for the rearing and perpetuation of the Wild Turkey. 
The book contains many illustrations. 

PRICE, - $2.50 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



1611: M 



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***"- 



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":'.♦♦) 



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When We Have Game 
In Plenty 

THE day is coming when we shall have 
game in as great plenty in this country as 
we did fifty yearsago — when quail, grouse, 
ducks, wild turkeys, will be a common and appreciated sight on 
the table and in the fields and wood' . 

Has it ever occured to you that you can hasten the arrival of 
that day ! You can — by means of game farming. 

.... 

Game Farming is Pleasant and Profitable 



To anyone who has a small amount 
of land game farming will prove profit- 
able and pleasant— profitable because 
the demand for birds and eggs is 
much greater than the supply and 
good prices are paid — pleasant be- 
cause it is profitable and because you 
net only supply your own table with 
an abundance of good food but also in 
many instances enjoy good sport 
from the birds you raise. 



The more birds raised the better 
hunting there will be. Already, in 
some parts of the country, those 
who own large acreage are being 
paid by sportsmen for the game they 
raise and liberate. 

If you are interested in the subject 
from any standpoint write for our 
booklet, "Game Farming for Profit 
and Pleasure". It is well worth 
reading. Sent free on request. 
Please use the coupon below. 



Game Breeding Dept., Room 2.3 

HBJQCUJLE8 POWDER CO. 

Wilmington, Delaware 

Manufacturers of Explosives; Infallible and "E, C" Smokeless Shotgun Powders: 
L. & R. Orange Extra Black Sporting Powder: Dynamite for Farming. 



m 






Game Breading Department, Room ?fb 
Hercules Powder Company, 
Wilmington, Delaware 

Gentlemen; — Please send rr.e a copy tf "Game Farming for Froi'.t and Pleasure." I am- 

interested in game breeding from the standpoint of 

Name 

Address 

. " -—-?" --nr of 



162 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field — A Good Montana Resolution — A New Game Farm 

Tennessee Quail We Repeat — Doubles — More Members War Food 

Prices Harmless Legislation — The Migratory Bird Law — Things Worth 

Knowing. 

A Money Making Industry - D. W. Huntington 

The Moose in Minnesota - - - - - - - L. M. Brownell 

The Day's Mail - - - . - - - - - - By Our Readers 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves - - By Our Readers 

The Technique of Ant Eggs — Now Is the Time The Crow Call 

Quail and Pheasants — Game Breeding Association Leases Ant Eggs. 

Wild Rice - W. L. McAtee 

Editorials Reflections on a Shark Note — Taxing Gunpowder A California 

Outrage A Bad Start in Virginia. 



Heating and Cooking Stoves for 
Clubs and Cottages 



The Camp Cook Stove 

This is an ideal cook stove for the 
Miuing, Lumber and Military 
Camps; will work just as well in 
the open air as indoors. 

Construction Companies working 
large gangs of men will find this 
well suited to their requirements. 




A FEW OF THE LEADING STOVES FURNISHED 



Radnor Ranges 
Home Victor Ranges 
Victor Cook DobuleOven 

Ranges 
Hotel Ranges 
Royal Victor Ranges 
No. 10 Ironsides Cook 
Patrol Wood Stove 
No. 90 Ironsides 
Haddon Ranges 



Home Victor Hot Water Stoves 
Farmer Girl Cook 
New H. A. Elm Double Heaters 
Vulcan Double Heaters 

Tropic Sun Heating Stoves . ... 

Haddon Hercules Heating Stoves Victor Cook Ranges 
Ormond Ranges Loyal Victor Ranges 

No. 15 Hot Blast Heating Stoves Victor Hotel Ranges 
Victor Gem Cook Elm Ranges 

Laundry Stoves Farmer Boy Cook Stoves 



Index Heating Stoves 
Solar Kent Heating 

Stoves 
Prompt Ranges 
Cozy Ranges 



Our Friend Cook Stoves 
Sentry Wood Stoves 
Home Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Home Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Solar Cellar Furnaces 
Farmer's Furnaces and 

Cauldrons 



— — - Manufactured by —— 

S. V. REEVES, 45 N. 2nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



163 



r 



DtHlG 



3E 



3E1G 



Du Pont Wins the Nation's Shooting Classic 



St. Louis Introductory 

Harve Dixon, Oronogo, Mo. 

197x200 Shooting Du Pont 

Mound City Overture 

R. A. King, Delta, Colorado. 

99x100 Shooting Du Pont. 
National Amateur Championship 
Frank Troeh, Vancouver, Wash. 

99x100 Shooting Schultze. 
National Amateur Championship 

at Double Targets 

Alan Heil, Allentown, Pa. 

89x100 Shooting Du Pont 

Preliminary Handicap 

A. Koyen, Fremont, Neb. 

97x100 Shooting Du Pont. 

Grand American Handicap 

J. F. Wulf, Milwaukee, Wis. 

99x100 Shooting Schultze. 

Consolation Handicap 

H. E. Furnas, St. Louis, Mo. 

96x100 Shooting Du Pont. 

Long Run of Tournament 

Arthur Killam, St. Louis, Mo. 

165 Shooting Du Pont. 

All-Round Open Championship 

Homer Clark. Alton, Ills. 

187x200 Shooting Schultze. 

Ail-Round Amateur Championship 

E. L. Bartlett, Baltimore, Md. 

180x200 Shooting Du Pont. 



CT. LOUIS, Missouri— 618 of the Nation's 
^ Crack Shots lined up at the score — a battle 
royal for the country's shooting honors — and 
the wise shooters who used Du Pont Powder 
won every programmed event. There's your 
final proof of Du Pont superiority* 

At the Traps or in the Field 




are the Powders that win. 

Du Pont Ballistite Schultze 

Bulk or dense, each has its good points and each 
its friends. All are the acme of quality, uniformity 
and dependability. 

They Get That Winning Target 

Sold in all standard loads and shells, or in bulk, and 
used by 80 per cent, of America's Shooters. Insist 
upon them always. 

Write today for "Sport Alluring'' 
Booklet No. 354. 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & COMPANY 




Wilmington, Delaware. 

The Pioneer Powder Makers of America.. 







In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



164 



THE GAME BREEDER 



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REMINGTON 
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Loading'' 

SHOTGUN 



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'HE way these guns hold their sufierh 
A. shooting quality year after year is giving 
them the preference of hunters and trap- 
shooters all over the world. 

Remington UMC Pum£ Gun — "The Good Old 
Standby" — six shots, bottom ejection (empty 
shells, smoke, gas, go down, away from your face), 
solid breech, hammerless, safe. 
Remington UMC Autoloading Shot Gun — "The 
Auto Shot Gun that works" — five shots ; simply 
pull, the trigger for each shot, the recoil does the 
work ; solid breech ; hammerless ; safe. 

For the why and how oi the mechanical details — the reasons 
for smooth, positive action and certainty of the guns hitting 
where they are aimed, go to the 'dealer displaying the Red Ball 
Mark of Rtmington UMC, the Sign of Sportsmen's Head- 
quarters in every town. 

Clean and oil your gun with REM OIL — the combina- 
tion Powder Solvent, Lubricant and Rust Preventative 

THE REMINGTON ARMS UNION METALLIC 
CARTRIDGE COMPANY 

Largest Manufacturers of Firearms and Ammunition 

in the World 
Woolworth Building -New .York 



T h * Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter, July g, 1915, at the Post Office, New YorkJCity, 

New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



VOLUME IX 



SEPTEMBER, W6 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 6 



A Good Montana Resolution. 

One of our Montana members sends 
a clipping, from the Havre Plain 
Dealer, relating the action of the Mon- 
tana Game and Fish Commission which 
well illustrates an old saying of The 
Game Breeder: "Good game laws like 
bad ones are catching: One State after 
another catches them." It is interesting 
to observe how one game department 
after another decides that it is a good 
plan to make the commission of eco- 
nomic importance to all of the people 
and to see that it represents them all, 
and that everyone can have plenty of 
game to eat. Too many departments 
have been conducted as governmental 
side shows in the interest of sportsmen 
alone, who by antagonizing the farmers 
and other land owners have made it an 
easy matter for sentimentalists to put 
an end to dove shooting, quail shoot- 
ing* grouse shooting and in many States 
to the shooting of other species — wood- 
cock, upland plover, etc., etc. The reso- 
lution prepared by Commissioner M. I. 
Baldwin, of Kalispell, says "that the 
game and fish laws of this State should 
be so amended as to legitimatize the 
propagation of game and fish by private 
enterprise." 

The Preamble. 

The Plain Dealer, under the heading, 
"The State Board Would Encourage 
Private Propagation," quotes the State 
Game and Fish Commission as follows: 

"The game and fish of Montana are assets 
of great value to the people, hence the propa- 
gation of game and fish of desirable kinds 
should be encouraged by the laws of our State. 
The right of citizens to engage in the business 
of propagating game, fish and fur-bearing 
animals should be recognized as lawful, and 



calculated to increase the game and fish supply 
of the State, and that when such game and 
fish are propagated by private enterprise 
within private inclosure, the right to sell and 
dispose of such game and fish under reason- 
able regulations at all times should be per- 
mitted, the same as other privately owned live 
stock. 

"Therefore, it is moved as the sense of the 
Game and Fish Commission that the game and 
fish laws of this State should be so amended 
as to legitimatize the propagation of game and 
fish by private enterprise." 

Opposed to Spring Shooting. 

The Montana commission voicing its 
opposition to the spring shooting of 
water fowl, adopted the following: 

"Whereas the game laws of Montana make 
it unlawful and a misdemeanor to kill water 
fowl between the first day of January and the 
first day of September of each year, thereby 
abolishing spring shooting of such game, this 
commission clearly recognizes the wisdom of 
laws that protect such water fowl during the 
mating and brooding season, and that such 
laws are beneficial and do much to conserve 
such game for the use and benefit of all in- 
telligent and fair-minded sportsmen, but we 
view with alarm any legislation, whether Fed- 
eral or of sister States that may restore spring 
shooting in such State or States and deplore 
any action or steps that be taken by so-called 
sportsmen in such behalf in any of said States."' 

"Resolved by the Montana Game and Fish 
Commission that the reasonable protection of 
water fowl, so that American sportsmen may 
have a fair full season of shooting demands 
the abolishtnent of spring shooting in each 
and every State in the Union." 

Montana has an excellent Game and 
Fish Commission. The members of the 
commission are E. P. Mathewson of 
Anaconda, W. M. Bickford of Missoula 
and M. D. Baldwin of Kalispell. J. L. 
DeHart, State game warden, is the sec- 
retary. 

It is to be hoped that the commission 
may be retained in office until the State 
is made one of the biggest game produc- 



166 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T^ e Game Breeder 

Published Monthly 
Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 

NEW YORK, FEBRUARY, 1917. 

TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy— $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $i 2s. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 

THE OPEN SEASON. 

The more we consider the matter the 
more we become convinced that "there 
is a pleasure in the pathless woods" after 
game which is far more delightful to the 
eye and gratifying to the soul than the 
pursuit of game laws in the legislative 
halls. We have positively declined to- ap- 
pear before legislative committees and to 
enter the lobby. Anyone can put us down 
for a good shoot and a good game dinner 
and we will agree to shoot a little at the 
traps during the dinner hour and also 
when game is not in season provided the 
traps be kept in readiness and there be 
plenty of ammunition in the gun room, 
as there usually is at all well conducted 
modern game clubs and game breeding 
associations. 

The quail shooting is very good on 
many fields where we can shoot without 
fear of the police during January and 
February. We expect to bring home a 
lot of birds and to have them broiled for 
breakfast. We rejoice that since the 
"Happy Boots Wilson" case we can come 
home with our quail without going to 
jail and now we are eager to take the 
field. Those who want more game laws 
and who delight in the sport of the lobby 
may go north or east or west to their 
State Capitols and recite their little pieces 
beginning "Where are the buffalo and 
wild pigeon, etc.?" We prefer our va- 
cation with the setters and the gun in 



the southern fields, where the roar of 
the covey is far more pleasing than the •» 
roar of the more game law oratory in 
the legislative committee room. 

Each to his taste! The field and the 
lobby both are open in February! 
• 

QUAIL ON LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

. The open winter and absence of snow 
in Southern New York and some other 
parts of the country have been very fa- 
vorable to the quail and other birds which 
are winter residents. We have excellent 
reports about the quail on Long Island 
and the shooting promises to be very 
good next season not only on the club 
grounds, where the birds always are 
plentiful, because it pays to keep them 
so, but also on free territory where the 
birds occur by reason of their importa- 
tion and breeding by the preserve owners. 

A rumor was abroad recently that an- 
other attempt would be made to prohibit 
shooting the quail on Long Island and 
to create one mOre "food restriction" pre- 
venting their increase and, in fact, pre- 
venting any one from looking after the 
birds properly. 

The quail occur on Long Island in 
good numbers because they were pur- 
chased and introduced by sportsmen and 
they are properly looked after, because 
it pays to do so. Shooting is not pro- 
hibited. In fact, always, it is quite lively. 

The writer has purchased and liber- 
ated several hundred quail on Long Isl- 
and and is perfectly familiar with the 
conditions there. 

There is a large ' population on Long 
Island, especially in the summer, when 
the coast cottages are occupied. There 
are here, as elsewhere, many gunners 
who seem to be unaware that there are 
laws protecting doves at all times and 
the quail and other game at certain sea- 
sons. There are many foxes, hawks, 
crows, snakes and other enemies of game 
on Long Island. There are many dogs, 
cats and rats. Any naturalist familiar 
with the conditions on Long Island would 
advise the State to encourage the people 
to look after and protect the birds and 
by no means to prohibit such industry. 

Darwin said long ago that if shooting 



THE GAME BREEDER 



167 



were prohibited in England there would 
be fewer birds than at present, although 
hundreds of thousands of birds are shot 
annually. Any one with ordinary com- 
mon sense easily can understand that if 
shooting be prohibited on Long Island 
there will be fewer quail than at pres- 
ent, although the sport has been excel- 
lent for many years and will remain so 
if people who have no interest in Long 
Island and know nothing about condi- 
tions there can be induced to conduct 
their mischief-making industry else- 
where. 

• 

ROCKING-CHAIR SPORT. 

We recently read the following state- 
ment about sport in Ohio said to have 
been made by the President of the Board 
having charge of the game : "The fish 
and game interests of Ohio are being 
kept in a very prosperous condition under 
the care of a special committee of the 
Ohio State Board of Agriculture." 

The wild turkey, once abundant in 
Ohio has become extinct except on one 
game farm. The principal and practically 
the only game bird for Ohio sportsmen 
is the bobwhite quail. The area for duck 
shooting is very limited and we have 
been told that motorboats and riparian 
residents have sadly interfered with the 
duck shooting which once was good on 
the canal reservoirs. Bowhite has been 
on the song bird list for some time. We 
are told that the dove, also, has been 
placed on this list ; the dove is the second 
best game bird in Ohio. Recently a little 
pheasant breeding has started and we be- 
lieve those who own pheasants can shoot 
them without being arrested. 

When we recall the days when we 
found it an easy matter to bag twenty 
or thirty brace of quail in a day in Ohio, 
with a few doves, ruffed grouse and 
woodcock and an occasional wild turkey 
for good measure, it does not seem to 
us that the practical prohibition of sport 
which now exists is all that could be 
desired, or all that easily could be accom- 
plished by those who prefer the annual 
pursuit of "more game" to the annual 
pursuit of "more game laws." 



The kind of sport now enjoyed in 
Ohio seems to us to be that of the nim- 
rod who enjoys the pipe and the rocking 
chair. We can hardly imagine any one 
paying a high non-resident licensee fee to 
try the shooting in Ohio. 

Possibly the game conditions are con- 
sidered fine from the point of view of 
the farmer who is glad there is nothing 
to tempt trespassers. 



NEW YORK NONSENSE. 

All persons, including State Game Of- 
ficers, should read the quotation from 
the excellent report of the Massachu- 
setts Commissioners of Fish and Game 
printed on another page. 

"The policy of the Commission has 
been to encourage in every possible way 
the propagation of game birds." 

Permits are issued "upon request" 
and without charge to "any person, firm 
or corporation" to propagate any species 
of deer, elk, pheasants, quail, partridge, 
geese, wild ducks or squirrels for sale, 
exchange or to be given away. 

The Commission well says: "Such 
work contributes to the public welfare." 

How far behind the times New York 
seems to be when compared with Mas- 
sachusetts and many other States which 
encourage the profitable production of 
highly desirable foods! 

A large amount of money is expended 
annually in the effort to save the game 
in New York from extinction, but it is 
deemed necessary to charge the producer 
$5.00 for a license and to arrest him 
if he sells any quail, grouse or other 
game birds he may produce excepting 
only two common species of wild ducks 
and pheasants. 

The people of the more enlightened 
states must be amused at the nonsense 
in New York ; those who breed an abun- 
dance of game for sale as food are be- 
coming more and more disgusted and 
indignant that they can not send their 
food to the best market. We have a 
large mail on this subject, especially 
from the West and from parts of New 
England. 



168 



THE GAME BREEDER 



tending to shoot on public lands and 
waters will there find just what the regu- 
lations are. 
Iowa. 

Two most important laws have been 
enacted recently which should be given 
the widest publicity in the State of Iowa 
and the other States which have game 
breeders' laws. 

One of these new laws is the Iowa 
statute encouraging the profitable breed- 
ing of all species of game. The other is 
the amendment to the New York law 
opening the New York markets to the 
sale of game produced by industry in 
other States. The prices for game in 
New York are high. There is a rare 
chance for money-making in Iowa both 
for men and women, and in fact for chil- 
dren, since many boys and girls have 
made money with game. 

The Iowa law provides that : 

"Any person desiring to engage in the busi- 
ness of raising and selling pheasants, wild 
duck, quail and other game birds or any of 
them in a wholly enclosed preserve or enclos- 
ure of which he is the owner or lessee, may 
make application in writing to the State Fish 
and Game Warden for a license so to do. 
That the State Fish and Game Warden, when 
it shall appear that such application is made 
in good faith, shall upon the payment of an 
annual fee of $2 issue to such applicant a 
breeder's license permitting such applicant to 
breed and raise the above described game 
birds, or other game birds, or any of them, on 
such preserve or enclosure ; and to sell the 
same alive at any time for breeding or stock- 
ing purposes ; and to kill and use the same ; or 
sell same for food." 

The New York law provides that game 
produced by breeders in other States, 
which regulate the industry, may sell the 
food produced in the New York mar- 
kets, which, undoubtedly, are the best 
markets in the world for game. The 
courts are beginning to hold that any 
breeder can shoot and sell the game he 
-owns. 

Pheasants sell readily for $4 and $5 a 
pair in large lots when sold as food. They 
bring even higher prices when sold alive 
for propagation. Wild ducks sell readily 
for $3.00 per pair and last year many 
ducks were sold for $3.25 to $4.50 per 
pair. 



The best prices for quail and prairie 
grouse are paid for live birds. There is 
a demand for hundreds of thousands of 
birds and the quail sell for $25 per dozen 
and often more, in large lots. Prairie 
grouse will sell for $5.00 to $10.00 per 
pair in large lots and for better prices in 
small lots. There is also a big demand 
for deer. They sell for $25 and $35. 

Things Worth Knowing. 

In the States which have enacted game 
breeders' laws any sportsmen who wish 
to do so can organize inexpensive shoot- 
ing clubs and 

(1) Make their own season limits. 
They can shoot early in the fall when 
the weather is fine and it is a pleasure 
to be out of doors and as late in the 
winter as it may seem desirable to con- 
tinue the sport. 

(2) Make their own bag limits and 
shoot big bags of game during long open 
seasons. All that is necessary is to see 
that the game is kept plentiful ; that the 
hawks, crows, foxes, snakes and other 
enemies do not get most of it, and to stop 
the shooting in time to leave sufficient 
stock birds for another season. 

(3) Sell some of the abundant game 
to help pay the expense of producing it. 
This will make the people friendly to 
sport since they can have game to eat. 
The shooting can be made profitable. 

The best places for game production 
are the posted farms which can be 
opened to shooting by those who deal 
fairly with the owners. The shooting 
rent paid is usually from 5 to 10 cents 
per acre or from $32 to $64 per square 
mile per annum. We now have hun- 
dreds of clubs which deal fairly with the 
farmers and always have good shooting. 
Some shoot several thousand quails 
every season without any fear of exter- 
mination. Marshes which are likely to 
be drained, thus putting an end to duck 
shooting in the neighborhood, should be 
rented and preserved for sport. The 
overflow from such places always im- 
prove the shooting on public waters just 
as the quail and grouse going out from 
"noisy sanctuaries" improve the shooting 
for miles about. 



THE GAME BREEDER 169 

A MONEY MAKING INDUSTRY. 
The Game Breeders' License and Identification. 

By Dwight W. Huntington. 

We are asked why we favor the licens- of great antiquity going back to the Ro- 
ing of game breeders and the identifica- man laws, which decided that wild crea- 
tion of their game when sold. Many peo- tures are owned by the people in common 
pie claim that the game breeders' indus- because they have no other owner, 
try should be absolutely free ; that the Since the State, or possibly the Nation, 
breeder should not be required to have owns the wild game or game on public 
a license ; that he should not be required lands and waters, it seems reasonable for 
to identify the game he sells either by it to require those who rear game, ex- 
tagging it or shipping it with a prescribed actly similar in appearance to the State 
invoice or label, as the Colorado statute game, to list themselves as licensed breed- 
provides. A prominent and practical ers and to identify the game they send 
game protectionist of Indiana, Mr. John to the public markets. This is done, of 
W. Talbot, is openly opposed to all "li- course, to prevent the sale of wild game, 
cense and tag foolishness," as he puts it. If the State owns the game, and will fur- 
Indiana has taken his advice and the law nish or permit the taking of breeding 
provides that any one may breed game stock, it should, of course, prescribe the 
''in captivity" for sale without identifica- terms under which the breeder can sell 
tion. We have never opposed such legis- his product. 

lation, excepting to comment on the Game bred in a wild state on inclosed 

words, ''in captivity," which are in our farms, which some States now. say can 

opinion, a worse restraint than a small be sold by those who look after it, is. more 

license fee and the requirement that the easily stolen than poultry is. If the 

game produced for market must be iden- thief can mot dispose of- the stolen' game 

tified before it is sold. • because he has no license and no tags or 

Certain species of game, notably the invoices to identify it, he will soon find 

quails and grouse, can be produced far the stealing too unprofitable to warrant 

more cheaply in a wild state on protected his taking the risks, 
areas than they can be produced "in cap- If, therefore, the State charges noth- 

tivity." They are far better both for ing for the license issued to reputable 

sport and food when bred wild in the breeders, as is the case in Massachusetts, 

fields and woods than they are when or even makes a nominal charge of 50 

raised in small enclosures. Captivity cents a year (Ohio) or two dollars per 

bred game is subject to many diseases year (Iowa and other States), it seems 

which do not occur to wild game and to us the breeder should not object to the 

tame birds are not so satisfactory from regulations. The charge made for labels 

the sporting viewpoint as the birds bred or tags to identify the game sold should 

under natural conditions are. also be nominal, in no case more than the 

Why should the breeder of game birds cost of the labels or tags, 
be required to take- out a license and to Fruit farmers often use expensive 

identify the game he sells when the poul- labels to identify their fruit and to ad- 

trymen go free? This question sounds vertise their farms. The game farmer 

quite reasonable, to be sure, but we should be willing, for the present at least, 

should remember that there is a decided to put inexpensive labels On the packages 

difference between game and poultry, or inexpensive tags On the game he sends 

The idea that the State owns the game to market. 

has been given prominence by the courts We should remember that the game 

in America and undoubtedly it is an idea breeding history in America is young ; 



170 



'•:•[ 



THE GAME BREEDER 



that it is not so long ago that there was 
an absurd prejudice against anyone hav- 
ing any game; and that undoubtedly it 
is easier to secure game breeders' laws 
when they provide that the game must be 
identified than it is to secure laws with 
no safeguards made to please those who 
insist they are necessary. 

After all, if the breeder can get an 
excellent insurance against theft by pay- 
ing a few cents for a handful of identi- 
fication tags and an annual license fee of 
$2.00, or less, it does not seem to us that 
he is damaged much, especially since the 
game sells for fabulous prices and the 
breeder can add the license and tag 
charges to the price of the game and let 
the purchasers pay the bill. The hotels 
clubs and individuals who like to eat 
game, all are quite ready to pay the ex- 
tra price, which should not be over a 
fraction of a cent per pound of meat. 

We believe it will not be long before 
anyone who legally takes a game bird on 
public lands or waters will be held to be 
the owner of it by reason of his industry. 

Game legally taken in all civilized 
countries, excepting America, ceases to be 
State property and becomes the individ- 
ual property of the captor or shooter. He, 
of course, can sell his food. We have no 
doubt this will be the law in America in 
time. It will no doubt be a considerable 
time before we are as free as other coun- 
tries are; in the interval there is a rare 



chance for game and fish breeders to 
make a big lot of money. Some of the 
members of the Game Conservation So- 
ciety are now making from $10,000 to 
$20,000 per year and find the industry 
interesting and attractive. 

There are a number of women in the 
business, probably about an hundred, 
members of the Game Conservation So- 
ciety. They all find it interesting and 
soon all of them will report good profits 
as many have already so reported to The 
Game Breeder. 

We believe that in the few' States 
which have State game departments op- 
posed to the profitable production of food 
on the farms the laws soon will be amend- 
ed so as to provide that the departments 
shall have nothing to do with the game 
owned by individuals. We should not be 
surprised to see the departments abol- 
ished if the farmers ascertain they are 
depreciating farm values. Easily laws 
have been enacted prohibiting shooting on 
the farms and even prohibiting the shoot- 
ing of quail and other game at all sea- 
sons. 

It is unnecessary to charge anything 
for the game breeders' license; it is an 
outrage to charge $25 per year, as they 
do in California, and possibly in some 
other States. $5.00 per year is entirely 
too much. 

If a food producing industry is de- 
sirable it should be aided and encouraged 
and not prevented by high charges. 



THE MOOSE IN MINNESOTA. 

By L. M. Brownell, 
Supervisor Superior National Forest. 



The moose is the largest of the deer 
family (alces machlis or palmatus) and 
was given this name by the Algonquin 
Indians. They are found on this con- 
tinent from New Brunswick to western 
Alaska wherever there are unfrequented 
forests. They are apparently migrating 
northward as the forests are being ex- 
ploited and the country settled. 



The adult moose stands about six feet 
at the shoulders and may exceed this 
figure. The male bears very broad (pal- 
mate) divergent antlers. These horns 
are sometimes very immense. A pair in 
the Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 
has a spread of 78^2 inches, show 34 
points, measure 15 inches round the bur, 
and, along with the dry skull, weighs 



THE GAME BREEDER 



171 



93 pounds. The antlers form between 
them a sort of basin, for each broadens 
out in a great shovel-shaped expansion, 
with marginal points or snags, increas- 
ing usually with the years of life. The 
horns and fore feet are the principal 
means of defense. The general color 
is dark reddish brown, but becomes 
slightly lighter and grayer in winter. 
The limbs, especially the fore legs, are 
very long. The neck is short and the 
tail small. More detailed characteristics 
are the broad, hairy nostrils, the over- 
hanging upper lip, the small eyes and 
tear pits, long and broad ears, low stiff 
mane on the back of the neck, the long 
bell mane on the lower side of the neck 
and the brittle hair. 

They are for the most part solitary 
in their habits, except during the breed- 
ing season and during the winter months. 
In winters of deep snow a dozen or 
more are often found "yarded up" in 
swamps. 

The male animals often fight with one 
another. These fights sometimes last un- 
til one or both are dead. Occasionally 
the dead bodies are found with the horns 
locked together in such a manner that 
they cannot be separated except by 
breaking them. 

Moose are unlike the big game animals 
of the western country in that they stay 
and feed in the same territory summer 
and winter. During the hot weather of 
the summer months they stay around 
the lakes and streams and are com- 
monly seen in the water, where they 
feed on grasses, lily roots and wild rice. 
The flies bother them considerably and 
they are able to keep them away while 
in the water. In the fall they are found 
in the more open country. In winter, 
during stormy weather, they stay in the 
heavy timber for protection. During the 
winter months they browse on aspen, 
willow, birch, maple and hazel brush. 

The big game animal of the Minne- 
sota pineries is the moose. Approxi- 
mately two million acres of land has 
been set aside, in northern St. Louis, 
Lake and Cook counties, right in the 
heart of the moose country, as the Supe- 
rior State Game Refuge. This refuge 



includes a part of the Superior National 
Forest. Through a co-operative agree- 
ment between the State Game and Fish 
Commissioner and the Federal Forest 
Service the administrative officers of 
the Superior Forest are appointed State 
Game Wardens. They assist the State 
in patrolling the area within the bound- 
aries of the National Forest. A study 
of the habitat of the different game and 
fur bearing animals is part of the work 
done by the rangers. It is the unani- 
mous opinion of these men that the 
moose are decreasing quite rapidly. The 
cause is doubtless due to several reasons. 
For convenience, they are classified as 
follows : 

1. Illegally killed. 

2. Killed and left in the woods by 
non-resident hunters. 

3. Killed by wolves. 

4. Migrating further north. 

That there are many moose illegally 
killed goes without saying. Probably 
very few have any idea of the actual 
number killed in this manner. It is 
only a few years ago* that ten carcasses 
of moose were seen in Bald Eagle Lake 
and seven more were seen in a bay of 
Birch Lake during the same season. 
Each year the forest officers find car- 
casses lying in the water. In practically 
every case it was found that apparently 
not a pound of meat had been taken. 
It is pretty generally known that city 
"sports" in the country for an outing 
like to boast upon their return of having 
killed a moose. They are blamed for 
much of the promiscuous killing in the 
summer time. There is no sportsman- 
ship or glory in killing these animals 
during the fly season. There would be 
just as much sport in going out in the 
back yard and killing the family cow. 
Trappers often kill moose in the winter 
time for meat to bait traps and poison 
for wolves. Settlers and others kill them 
at all times to obtain meat for personal 
use. 

The law at present allows non-resi- 
dent hunters to kill moose but does not 
allow them to take any meat out of the 
State. However, they can have the head 
mounted and it then may be taken out. 



172 



THE GAME BREEDER 



These hunters are known as head hunt- 
ers and unless detected may kill several 
moose before getting the head they want. 
The law should be changed so as to re- 
quire the hunter to bring the carcass 
out of the woods so that some use can 
be made of the meat. Many people are 
of the opinion that wolves do not kill 
moose. It seems, however, from obser- 
vations made this winter on the Kawish- 
iwi river, east of Ely, that several moose 
have been killed by these animals. This 
statement will be vouched for by a for- 
est officer who was engaged on timber 
sale work in that vicinity and by logging 
operators. Many wolves have been seen 
in that territory this winter and wolf 
signs were plentiful. It is generally 
conceded that when a country settles up 
the moose move on further into the wil- 
derness. In this respect they are very 
much unlike the deer, which like to hang 
around the settlements, apparently to 
keep away from the wolves. 

We believe that unless the moose are 
given better protection in the future than 
in the past, they will go the route of the 



great game animal of the West, the buf- 
falo. 

Note : Moose can now be legally killed 
by the licensed hunter only in Minne- 
sota, Alaska and ten Canadian Prov- 
inces. If moose hunting is continued in 
Minnesota the only barrier to early ex- 
termination in this State is the sanctu- 
ary afforded by the Superior State 
Game Refuge, created in 1909 as a ref- 
uge and breeding ground for all game, 
particularly for moose. It is therefore 
of the utmost importance that this ref- 
uge be thoroughly patrolled and that 
illegal killing thereon be entirely elim- 
inated. The Superior Refuge is, for the 
most part, uninhabited and is generally 
unsuited to agriculture. It is an ideal 
range for big game, extending along the 
Canadian boundary for 90 miles east 
and west through St. Louis, Lake and 
Cook counties, and is 36 miles wide from 
north to south at its widest point. It 
rivals the great national parks of the 
Rocky Mountain region in picturesque 
beauty and attractiveness. — Fins, Feath- 
ers and Fur. 



THE DAY'S MAIL. 

Tit would be impossible to print a very small percentage of the unsolicited letters 
which come daily to the Game Conservation Society and its publication, The Game Breeder. 
The following letters are samples.— Editor.] 



"More" Eyes Opened. 

To The Game Breeder: 
• I enclose a check for subscription. The 
paper has also opened my eyes to condi- 
tions I had never dreamed existed. I 
am glad to see The Game Breeder and 
wish it would come every week instead 
of every month. 

G. Floyd Shulz. 
Michigan. 

The Hay Fever Cure. 

Editor Game Breeder : 

I read the August Game Breeder last 
night with much interest. You are keep- 
ing it up to the mark. I noticed the item 
about Hay Fever and then started to find 
the advertisement. I looked the paper 
over four times before I found it. If it 



had not been for your reference to the 
advertisement I never should have seen 
it. There is no invitation for your read- 
ers to send for a circular or do anything. 
Such an advertisement will never pro- 
duce results. 

M. T. Richardson. 
New York. 

Without the "Terrific Holler." 

The Game Breeder: 

We notice your criticism on New Mex- 
ico, and we think it well taken. We have 
done less business there than in any State 
in the Union, save Nevada. We also no- 
tice a communication from Mrs. S. 
Hirsh. We have bought her stuff and 
we must say she is honest. In a ship- 
ment there were some small ring-necks 






THE GAME BREEDER 



173 



which were dead when we ' received 
them. We informed her without asking 
her to refund, but she replied with a sat- 
isfactory letter and madeus good on the 
birds. You should speak a good word 
for her. It has been our experience that 
even where we make a "terrific holler" it 
is very seldom we are reimbursed. 

C. and Co. 
Kentucky. 

Inquiry for Quail Shooting. 

Advertising Manager, The Game Breed- 
er : 

In answer to the advertising offering 
good quail shooting near New York, I 
wish to ask particulars. Will you please 
put me in touch with the owner of the 
shooting. I think it is just what I want. 
Also let me know about the Longwood 
Club; amount of annual dues, number 
of members, etc. Yours truly, 

C. W. Johnston. 
New Jersey. 

Ant Egg Technique. 
Editor Game Breeder: 

I am sending you a short note about 
the technique of ant eggs. S. 

New York. 

Cotton Tails. 

Game Breeder: 

We have plenty of cotton tails here. 
Would it pay to advertise them and sell 
them to shooting clubs? What prices 
will they pay ? 

[Ans. — Yes, they will sell quickly at prices 
mentioned in our letter, provided your State 
game officers have common sense and the laws 
of the State are right. We will look into, 
both matters. Western State and writer's 
name omitted pending common sense investi- 
gation. — Editor.] 

Why Not Kentucky. 

Game Conservation Society : 

We notice remarks about a party in 
New York buying land in Virginia for 
a game farm. The laws of our State 
are in fairly good shape and we have 
wondered why people should not come 
to this section. 

We are exactly 23 hours from New 
York. I can get land here for members 



of the society— no rake off or commission 
to me — at $5.00 per acre, which would 
make an ideal game farm. I would be 
•pleased to have any sportsman who is 
contemplating such a farm as my guest 
and to show it to him and I would not 
expect him to buy anything or to pay for 
his keep. Kentucky has a common sense 
breeders' law and a good state game de- 
partment. R. A. C. 
Kentucky. j£ 

More Ducks. 

Conservation Society : 

Please send me "Our Wild Fowl and 
Waders." Three letters in one mail. 

[This book has produced a number of duck 
ponds where wild duck are reared for sport 
and for profit. Sales for twoweeks, 30 books, 
which is going some for the good old summer 
time. "More" books, "more" ducks, "more" 
guns, "more" ammunition, "more" sport, 
"more" eggs, "more" live bird sales, "more" 
game in the markets, "more" people friendly 
to sport] 

A Virginia Farm. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

Before deciding to buy the farm in 
Virginia I wrote to the Game Commis- 
sioner as you advised. I am sending; 
you his reply. Please return it when, 
you are through with it. 

F. A. W. Shaw. 

Monisunk Farm, N. Y. 

[The reply is printed on another page. We 
still think no one will be arrested for food 
producing in Virginia, but if the attitude of 
the new commissioner continues threatening 
as the letter indicates, it will tend to much 
impair the value of the farm and the tax rates 
on such properties should be reduced accord- 
ingly. 

One of our readers was arrested some time 
ago for producing game in Virginia and said 
that he proved that he owned the game. The 
court decided that ever since Blackstone's time 
— and long before, if we remember rightly — 
there was a difference between wild creatures 
said to belong to the State because the poor 
things had no other owner and game produced 
by industry. We believe the court told the 
officers to keep their hands off. We would 
like to hear from our Virginia reader about 
this case. It is some time since the matter 
was referred to in a letter which seems to- 
have been mislaid. 

We believe game breeding will continue to 
thrive in Virginia, and if the game depart- 
ment declines to safeguard the industry it 
should certainly go way back outside the fence 
and sit down.] 



174 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Lease Wanted. 

The Game Breeder: 

Will you please send me a form for 
a shooting lease. I contemplate form- 
ing a game breeders' association. 

E. A. W. 

Oklahoma. 

[We are sending a copy of the lease used 
by one of the best game breeding associations 
in the Middle West. We think this lease can 
be shortened and simplified and that the 
declaratory clause at the beginning well may 
be left out. It states a well-known fact, but 
it does not strengthen the legal document in 
our opinion. Since leases for various terms 
of years must be recorded in the proper office 
in the States, requiring records, we always 
advise that new game breeding associations 
employ a competent attorney familiar with 
the laws of the locality. We believe the lease 
can be made very short and simple and we 
will publish a form in a booklet about creating 
game breeding associations which is in prep- 
aration. Our advice, however, will be to let 
the local attorney (who should be a member 
of the "shoot") make any changes in the 
form which may be needed in the locality.] 
The Game Breeder, 

150 Nassau Street, New York. 

Big Business. 

My ad in your paper, by which I advertised 
to purchase certain stock, brought satisfactory 
results. I soon found that most everybody 
wished to buy, and if I had advertised game 
birds and animals for sale instead of to pur- 
chase I would have had an overwhelming de- 
mand. This gave me an insight into the rapid 
growth of the business. 

Robert Hutchinson. 

Colorado. 

1 Sharks. 

Stanford University, Cal., 

Aug. 16, 1916. 
Editor of The Game Breeder: 

Referring to your note on sharks on 
page 134 of your August number, per- 
mit me to say that the only shark that 
is yet positively known to be a man- 
eater is the great white shark, Carcha- 
rodon carcharias. This is found in 
tropical seas and goes north once in a 
while in the Gulf Stream. It has never 
t>efore been taken nearer New York than 
the south shore of Cape Cod, but a 
young one has been lately caught in New 
"York harbor, probably the one that has 
done the mischief to bathers. I have 
great doubt whether the presence of this 
specimen is anything more than an acci- 



dental running off the track. I do not 
think that it has anything to do with 
the killing of the swordfish, nor have I 
ever known a case in which a swordfish 
has attacked a big shark. 

Thirty-six years ago I caught one of 
these white sharks, thirty feet long, at 
Soquel, in California. It had a young 
sea lion, weighing about 100 pounds, in 
its stomach. I heard of one in Hawaii 
which made way, not all in one piece, 
with a dead horse which had been 
thrown into the sea. 

Very truly yours, 

David Starr Jordan. 

Wolves. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

On a farm that this house operates, 
approximately twenty miles north of the 
city, a considerable number of wolves 
are causing trouble. I write to inquire 
as to the most efficient method of ex- 
terminating this pest. In addition to the 
wolves there are some foxes and mink 
that should also be exterminated. 

Enclose addressed and stamped en- 
velope and will appreciate an early re- 
ply. Thanking you in advance for this 
courtesy. 

S. Kruse. 

Hotel Radisson, Minnesota. 

Muskrats. 

The Game Breeder: 

Can you give me any information of 
anyone raising muskrats in an enclosed 
slough, and if there are any such places 
in operation, and if more than one that 
you know of, give me the address of 
the closest one to Minnesota? 

I have a large slough (120 acres) and 
there was taken off of this slough 2,000 
muskrats which got me to thinking that 
raising muskrats might be made a profit- 
able proposition. 

Enclosed find stamps for a reply and 
thanking you in advance. 

Minnesota. 

Wilfred D. Oleson. 

[Write to the man whose name we are 
sending. We shall be glad to have any of our 
readers answer the above. — Editor.] 



More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 




THE GAME BREEDER 



* t 



175 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



The Technique of Ant Eggs. 

In order to separate ants from ant 
eggs, take a bottle and put some anise 
perfume in it and place the bottle among 
the ants and eggs. You will find the ants 
will carry all their eggs in the bottle 
without themselves remaining therein. 

Caution — keep the bottle dry. 

Christian Pflederer. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

[We shall be obliged to the writer if he 
will inform us how the ant eggs sold for bird 
food are prepared for the dealer. — Editor.] 

Now is the Time. 

Shooting clubs and game preserve 
owners who wish to purchase a few hun- 
dred or a few thousand pheasants, wild 
turkeys, ducks or other game for the fall 
shooting would do well to write to our 
advertisers now. Young game birds 
when full feathered and full grown can 
be moved safely. There will be few, if 
any losses. The birds can be purchased 
now for about one-half what they will 
cost later. The prices already are high. 
They are going higher. 

Clubs which are breeding quail, grouse, 
wild turkeys and other indigenous game 
wild in the fields and where no hand-rear- 
ing is done will find it desirable to pur- 
chase a few pheasants for the fall shoot- 
ing. They can be liberated to advantage 
shortly before the quail season opens un- 
der the club rules ; and this may be quite 
early in October or even in September 
in the States which have good game 
breeders' laws. The early shooting when 
the weather is fine is desirable. Of 
course, the late covies of quail which bear 
small birds will not be shot for a month 
or so. It will be found quite interesting 
to put up a pheasant occasionally when 
shooting quail and doves early in the 
season. Some of the pheasants which 
escape the guns will nest on preserves 
where vermin is controlled. 

The Wild Duck Trouble and Other 
Good Notes from Minnesota. 

A Minnesota reader, referring to the 
item in the August issue of The Game 



Breeder about a wild duck malady, says 
we have had the same; trouble with our 
ducks and I have found it in the ducks 
on other farms. It seems strange that 
anyone in the business should not know 
the disease. If it is the same as I have 
found it in different places, it is nothing 
more than "roup." Conkeys medicines 
can be used with fair success by those 
who do not have their own cures. 

Our reader adds that he has discovered 
that a parasite known as "jiggers" kills 
prairie grouse. It has long been known 
that what is probably the same parasite is 
very injurious to ruffed grouse in some 
seasons and in some places. The "wood- 
tick," so called in some localities, will also 
make a decided impression on a lot of 
children picking huckleberries, as we 
have had occasion to observe, and one of 
the youths often quoted a remark of the 
writer (after the experience referred to) 
that it was safer to pick the huckleberries 
with dimes handed to local pickers who 
came to the door. Much has been writ- 
ten about the "tick" and the ruffed 
grouse. 

We do not regard it strange that those 
beginning to rear wild ducks should not 
knowi "roup." The leading English au- 
thorities say that the wild ducks are quite 
free from diseases, and we have found 
this to be true, having bred many thous- 
ands of ducks and having visited tens of 
thousands more without ever hearing a 
complaint about any trouble, excepting 
the usual "straddles" and cramp. 

One thing is certain, that too much 
"in captivity" and sometimes a very littie 
of this will start diseases which birds in 
a wild state do not appear to have. 

Our correspondent is clearly right in 
saying comparatively little is known 
about the diseases of birds, even poul- 
try. The best medicine is prevention. 
Do not crowd the birds too much. Do 
not attempt to rear them in unsanitary 
places. Whenever possible, breed the 
game (especially the quail and all the 
grouse) in a wild state in protected, safe 
and attractive fields and woods. As many 
birds quickly can be reared by beat 



176 



THE GAM$ $#£ERPi 



keepers in this way as the land will carry 
and more 'thar* ''this imeans the sure ap- 
pearance of some form of disease. 

We have often 'pointed '-©tit that : wild- 
bred birds are far- more able to- escape 
from their natural enemies (which surely 
will appear hf numbers in the best regu- 
lated places) " than^ tame hand-reared 
birds are.- The last -named, when liber- 
ated whife J the ; usual vermin occurs often 
quickly varlish and all the work done in 
rearing therti or all the money spent in 
buying them is lost. 

We regret' -that our Minnesota reader 
asks us not to use- his name. There is 
nothing to be diffident about in what he 
says. His long letter is full of informa- 
tion and good sense. 

If game ranching be encouraged in the 
big western States (as it seems likely it 
soon will be in all of them) just as cattle 
ranching and sheep ranching were en- 
couraged and as agriculture always is, 
just think what will happen! Are we 
not right in saying America soon will 
become the biggest game producing coun- 
try in the world ? 

We repeat for emphasis the statement 
that all State departments should permit 
the trapping of stock birds by reputable 
breeders who are prepared to multiply 
their numbers. It is absurd to say that 
everyone can shoot 10 or 25 birds in a 
day or some other number and that no 
one can procure stock birds in order to 
multiply their numbers. 

Our readers who wish additional copies 
of the illustrated book on "Game Farm- 
ing for Profit and Pleasure," for free 
distribution, can procure them by writ- 
ing to the Hercules Powder Company, 
Wilmington, Delaware, and enclosing the 
coupon attached to their advertisement 
which appears regularly in The Game 
Breeder. The book seems to convert the 
people wherever it is read. Game shoot- 
ing rapidly is becoming even more im- 
portant than trap shooting. They go well 
together on the same ground. 

The Crow-call. 
By A. V. Lindouist. 

With a well, accurately toned crow-call 
there should be a surprise to all sports- 



, men who have tirn,e,to Praetic^aJit^^ut 
^■6i season 'as well' as to Hake some 'in- 
terest in helping to make the duck or 1 
game shooting all the better. There is 
but! one good quality in crows and that is 
that they do destroy a great many nests 
of the snapping turtle, but outside of that 
I don't see any value in them. How 
they can locate these nests of turtles is 
a conundrum- to me, but that they do find 
them I know to be a fact as the evidence 
is plainly seen on turtle nesting grounds 
and I have seen them at work digging 
them up. Oh, they are wise guys, I tell 
you, and the harm they do is never fully 
realized. It will take some time to get 
the sportsmen to discover the effect of 
crow-calls on crows and to get the habit 
of setting aside a day now and then for 
crow hunting, as we do here, but it will 
come with time and any help in the line 
of recommendation by papers and indi- 
viduals having one in use will soon get 
the calls going and the good they will do 
is manifold. Crows ! Well you might 
as well say rattlesnakes to me! I surely 
have seen enough to know what I am 
talking about. I could write a book on 
my observations alone and what I have 
come across in hunting them. 

Quail and Pheasants. 

This letter was sent out to try and 
interest farmers in quail and winter 
feeding; also to see if there was any 
direct evidence of antagonism between 
quail and pheasants. 

J. C. Phillips. 
Dear Sir : — 

For ten or twelve years the whistle of the 
Bob-white (quail) has been practically absent 
from Essex County and indeed all sections 
north of Boston. In order to try and re- 
store this splendid bird to our covers again, 
work has been on foot at the writer's farm 
for over two years. Last season about 175 
quail were reared from eggs layed by captive 
birds, and allowed to roam at will as soon as 
they were able to care for themselves. An- 
other lot will be reared this year. These birds 
have apparently wintered well and scattered 
through the west end of Wenham and into 
Danvers. Some residents were good enough 
to feed bevies during the hard winter of 1916, 
a procedure which it is hoped will be fol- 
lowed up next winter. 

The relation between the Bob-white and the 
pheasant has always been an open question, 






THE GAME BREEDER 



177 



and the writer would like once and for all "to 
settie this question. On Cape Cod there are 
few pheasants, and many quail, whereas, here 
in Essex County the reverse is the case, 
bince our quail were wiped out by two very 
hard winters, they have never been able to 
work back and restock Essex County again. 
This suggests that the old cock pheasants 
may interfere with the nesting of the quail. 
This notice is sent out partly in the hope that 
some of the residents may be able to throw 
direct light on this point. 

Quail are protected by law in Essex County 
for a term of years, but, unfortunately, laws 
do not always protect. To form a quail ref- 
uge a tract of land has been leased in the 
Birch Plains region, and, unless the large 
numbers of pheasants are found to directly 
interfere with the nesting of Bob-whites, we 
should soon have a fair number of birds 
about our farms. 

The blank postal cards are enclosed with 
the hope that individuals who are favorably 
situated can send in reports of flocks of quail 
from time to time in order that we may form 
some estimate as to whether the birds are 
increasing in a satisfactory manner. Any 
other information about quail, especially the 
relation between quail and pheasants, will be 
highly appreciated. 

The Bob-white is valuable both to the 
sportsman and the farmer. As an insect de- 
stroyer he was recognized long ago by our 
biological survey as of the greatest impor- 
tance. Some States have even gone so far 
as to place him among song birds on the 
protected list. In view of these facts this 
effort to restore the species seems worth 
while. 

Very truly yours, 

John C. Phillips. 

Massachusetts. 

Form of Lease. 

THE GAME BREEDING ASSOCIATION. 

Whereas, The Farmers and land holders of 
and adjoining counties are now, and 
for years have been, greatly annoyed, ha- 
rassed and often damaged by unauthorized 
persons trespassing upon their lands shooting 
at and pursuing game in and out of season 
upon their premises and upon the highways 
adjacent thereto; and, 

Whereas, The Game Association 

has been regularly chartered by the State of 
for the express purpose of giving abso- 
lute protection to land holders in the full 
enjoyment of their rights under the state 
law against trespassers and unauthorized 
hunters, and for the further purpose of pur- 
chasing, propagating and plainer on these 
and contiguous lands all kinds of pheasants, 
game birds, and game that will not be in- 
jurious to crops, and that will thrive in this 
climate, and for the protection of such propa- 
gated game and such natural game as is now 
or will hereafter be placed or found upon such 
lands; therefore 



This Indenture, made this day of 
19 , between of the county of' 

and State of , of the first part, and the 

Game Association, of the 

County of and State of , of the 

second part, witnesseth : That the said party 
of the hrst past, for and in consideration of 
the sum of , to him in hand paid by the 

party of the second part, the receipt whereof 
is hereby acknowledged, and the covenants 
hereinafter recited, does hereby grant, bar- 
gain, sell and convey unto the said party of 
the second part, the free, irrevocable and un- 
interrupted right, privilege and liberty 01 
propagating game and shooting, pursuing, re- 
trieving and retaining natural and propagated 
game upon the acres of land described 

as follows : 



situate in the County of and State of 

, for the period of ten years next 
after the date hereof ensuing; together with 
free ingress, egress, regress and passage in 
and over the above described premises, for 
the purposes hereinafter mentioned, to and 
for the said party of the second part, its offi- 
cers and members and such other persons as 
bear permits regularly issued under seal by 
such officers in accordance with the rules and 
by-laws of the said party of the second part. 

The party of the first part covenants and 
agrees that he will, in so far as he is able, 
during the term of this lease, protect and 
preserve all game which may naturally or by 
propagation be upon the above described 
premises from killing, shooting and ensnaring 
or other interference by all persons other than 
officers and members of the party of the sec- 
ond part and persons by such officers or mem- 
bers regularly authorized in accordance with 
the rules and by-laws of the party of the 
second part; that he will himself observe and, 
in so far as he is able, will compel tne observ- 
ance by others upon the above described 
premises of the rules and by-laws of the 
party of the second part, and the laws of the 
State of for the protection and pres- 

ervation of game. 

The party of the second part hereby cove- 
nants and agrees that it shall and will well 
and truly indemnify the said party of the 
first part for all damage which the said party 
of the first part may suffer by reason of any 
act done or omitted by any officer or member 
of the said party of the second part, or by 
any person bearing a permit regularly issued 
by such officer in accordance with the rule^ 
and by-laws of the said party of the second 
part, for which act or omission such officer, 
member or other person would be personally 
liable in damages, it being the purpose of the 
Association to stand between the party of the 
first part and all persons trespassing upon 
such lands. 

The Association will employ leeal counsel 
to aid in protecting the lands covered by this 
agreement from trespassers, and will appoint 



178 



THE GAME BREEDER 



such number of wardens as is necessary to to see you next week and will go over the 

watch after and protect the game upon such detaiU of thi§ and other matters> 
lands from unauthorized hunters, and will u p V Tr> 

further cause the lands to be posted as re- rlERBERT K. JOB. 

quired by the State law. West Haven, Conn._ 

GAME , ASSOCIATION,. A t ~ 

Ants Eggs. 

y President. Dr. Herbert K. Job, the author of 

Attest: "Propagation of Wild Birds," advertised 

— ■ ■ on another page, says : Another useful 

Secretary. early food is the commercial dried ants' 

eggs. There may be some question as 

to just how much nourishment these real- 

— ly contain. At any rate, the young birds 
Duck Trouble. are f ond f them, and they are supposed 
Editor Game Breeder : to supply an element of insect food. Be- 
About this disease — it is a good de- ing rather expensive, they would not be 
scription of roup. A consignment of practicable for large flocks of young 
gray partridges once came to Storrs, pheasants, but for a moderate number 
when I was conducting experimental of little quails or grouse they are very 
work there, in just that condition. useful. They are purchased from deal- 
It is a disease which originates in un- ers and should be scalded and fed moist, 
clean conditions, and is contagious or in- once a day. 

f ectious. Moreover, it is usually fatal, if Who knows how to gather and prepare 

allowed to get well started. I will be in these? 



WILD RICE. 

By W. L. McAtee. 



Wild rice (Zisania palustris and 
Zizania aquatic a)* in every stage of its 
growth is eaten by one or another of the 
North American ducks and geese, and 
practically all of them feed on its rip- 
ened grain. It is the staple fall food of 
many ducks in the numerous rice 
marshes of the eastern part of the 
United States. Ducks obtain seeds 
mainly from the bottom in shallow water 
where they have fallen into a bed of 
soft muck to await germination. Ger- 
mination is often so delayed that grain 
may sprout at any time up to at least 
18 months after ripening. This accounts 
for the fact that young shoots and ger- 
minating seeds of wild rice are found 
in ducks' stomachs at practically all sea- 
sons. The shoots are devoured by many 
species; the flowers have been found in 
the wood duck's stomach; and the stems 
and leaves of the mature plants are eaten 



by geese. According to present informa- 
tion the mallard appears to eat the larg- 
est percenage of wild rice, more than a 
sixth of its annual food being rice. The 
black duck and the wood duck rank next 
as consumers of wild rice, but several 
other species take noteworthy quantities. 
Description of Plant. 

Wild rice is a tall, roond-stemmed 
grass with long, flat, pointed leaves (fig. 
1 ) . The stem is hollow, but is furnished 
with transverse partitions between as 
well as at the joints. These partitions 
may be seen when the stem is cut length- 



*For a fuller account of wild rice the reader 
is referred to the following publications^ the 
Bureau of Plant Industry, from which many of 
the details here given are taken : Wild Rice : 
Its Uses and Propagation (Bulletin 50, 1903) ; 
The Salt Water Limits of Wild Rice (Bulletin 
72, Part II, 190S) ; The Storage and Germina- 
tion of Wild Rice Seed (Bulletin 90, Part I, 
1905). 









THE GAME BREEDER 



179 



wise. The base of the stem is in the 
form of a stout hook and from it arise 
the numerous fibrous roots which serve 
mainly to anchor the plant to the bot- 
tom. The flowers of wild rice usually 
appear during the latter part of July, but 
may be found as late even as November. 
The appearance of the flower head is 



ends. A low rib runs along the whole 
length of one side and a shallow groove 
along the other. The husk of the seed 
(fig. 2, B) has six longitudinal grooves 
and a long pointed beak, the whole being 
an inch and a half or sometimes even 
more in length. The appearance of the 
flower head, or of the grain, distin- 




Fig. 2— Wild Rice. 



very characteristic (fig. 1) ; the lower 
branches, which bear the staminate or 
male flowers, are widely separated and 
stand out from the stem, while the upper 
branches of pistillate flowers are erect 
and more or less compactly grouped to- 
gether. The grain (fig. 2, A) of wild 
rice is from one-half to three-fourths of 
an inch in length, slender, of uniform* 
diameter, and with rounded or pointed 



guishes wild rice from any other aquatic 
grass in its range.* 

Distribution 

Natural growths of wild rice have been 
found from the northern end of Lake 
Winnipeg eastward along the northern 
shores of the Great Lakes and the St. 



*Bul. 50, 1903 ; Bui. 90, Pt. I, 1905. 



180 



,.,y_. jjj 



'<•) , '•>', 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Lawrence River to New Brunswickf ; 
from Central Dakota, western Nebraska, 
and eastern Texas to the Atlantic coast ; 
and as far south along that coast as cen- 
tral Florida. (See fig., 3.) The plant is 
rather local and of course is confined to 
the lowlands. The center of abundance 
is in Wisconsin, Iowa and Minnesota. 

Transplanting Wild Rice. 
Although wild rice does not grow nat- 
urally in every suitable place within its 
range, in most cases it can be made to 
do so by transplanting. Formerly wild 
rice was often transplanted by various 
tribes of Indians, and investigations by 
the Bureau of Plant Industry have 
shown that with proper treatment of the 
seed the plant may be propagated in any 
favorable waters in the country. It has 
also been successfully grown in Europe. 
The black spots on the accompanying 
map (fig. 3) represent numerous locali- 
ties where it has been successfully trans- 
planted in North America. The showing 
thus made should encourage those who 
are looking for a plant to make barren 
waters attractive to ducks, and especially 
those who have already tried wild rice 
without success. However, experiment- 
ers must be prepared for occasional fail- 
ure, for both wild rice and wild celery 
sometimes refuse to< grow in localities 
which appear to possess every requisite 
for their successful propagation. The 
usual cause of failure has been improper 
treatment of the seed between the time 
of harvesting and sowing, resulting in 
loss of vitality. When growing natur- 
ally, the ripe seeds fall directly into the 
water, where they sink, and, being pro- 
vided with barbed beaks, penetrate deep- 
er and deeper into the muck surrounding 
the roots of the parent plant. There they 
lie through the winter. They may ger- 
minate in spring, or they may lie prac- 
tically dormant through still another cold 
season. The seeds therefore remain wet 
until ready to sprout; they are exposed 
to currents of water, are not in close con- 
tact with each other, and are not sub- 
jected to very high temperatures. To suc- 
ceed with wild rice it is necessary only to 
imitate nature's methods. Keeping large 

tit is reported without definite locality from 
Newfoundland. 



quantities of the seed in close contact 
often causes fermentation, but this can 
be prevented by cold storage. 

So far as propagation depends on the 
preservation of the vitality of the seed, 
the methods* so carefully worked out 
by the Bureau of Plant Industry insure 
success. Several seed firms now handle 
wild rice properly, and will deliver it in 
either spring or fall as desired. The 
grain is kept wet and in cold storage and 
when shipped is packed in damp moss 
or fiber. 

"Sometimes when the stand of wild rice 
has become reduced, it is advisable to„ 
prevent consumption by ducks by har- 
vesting the grain and then sowing it after 
the spring migration. Because the seeds 
of wild rice ripen and drop off a few 
at a time, the seed must be collected 
every day or so, or the heads must be 
bunched and tied, so as to prevent the 
loss of seed. The grain may perhaps 
be allowed to stand a short time in cold 
water (if the water is changed daily)! 
But when the whole crop has been gath- 
ered, it should be placed at once in cold 
storage at a temperature just above 
freezing, or from 32 degrees to 34 de- 
grees Fahrenheit, but still exposed to the 
air in an open cask or vat. 

In cold climates seed may sometimes 
be perfectly preserved by improvised 
methods. For instance, wild rice seed 
kept out of doors and covered with water 
which was changed daily during the win- 
ter except when frozen, germinated very 
satisfactorily. It has been stored also 
in partly filled burlap bags among which 
blocks of ice were placed and the whole 
covered with sawdust and kept wet. But 
usually, where cold storage is not avail- 
able, it is better to buy seed from a re- 
liable firm. 

Where to plant. — Wild rice thrives 
best upon a mud bottom (though it has 
been known to grow in sand) ; this may 
be underlain by various soils, but there 
should be a layer of mud at least from 2 
to 4 inches deep and preferably deeper. 

*The southern Zizaniopsis, with flower and 
grain superficially much like Zizania, does not 
have the flower head as a whole divided into 
pistillate and staminate parts, and the grain is 
short and without beak. 



THE GAME BREEDER 181 

Wild rice usually does not do well where plants, when near together, support each 

there is much current or change in the other, the root anchorage is protected, 

level of the water, although it grows and a good stand is more likely to result 

abundantly on tide flats. It must be re- than if the seed is more widely scat- 

membered that wild rice is not adapted tered. 
to stagnant water. When to plant.— -Fall has usually been 

It may also be added that the salt- considered the most desirable time for 

water limits of wild rice may be deter- sowing, but it has been proved that seed 

mined approximately by the simple test sown i n spr ing will bring a full crop, and 

of taste. When water is appreciably f or several reasons spring sowing is usu- 

salty to the taste it is too salty for the a n y advisable. Where seed has been 

successful growth of this plant.* sown m ^\ f t h e bottom may freeze and 

From 4 inches to 6 feet of water are t h e seed be carried off by the ice in 

about the limits of its usual occurrence, spr i n g. Ducks and other waterfowl, as 

and it does best m from 1 to 3 feet. In well as some fi s h es , eat the seed, and the 

shallow water it may be killed by heat less it j s exposed to their depredations 

in summer, so it is best, in southern lo- the more abundant will be the crop. Seed 

cahties especially, to sow the seed in not is likely also to be buried by depositions 

less than 2 feet of water. £ mU( ^ or swe pt away by currents, es- 

How to plant.— The least possible time pec i a n y m f res hets. These dangers may 

must intervene between removal from be avoided by sowing the seed in spring 

cold storage and sowing. Broadcast sow- i a te enough to avoid the worst spring 

ing answers every purpose, and the seed fres hets but in time to get the benefit of 

should be thickly sown, as the growing the first good grow i ng weather ; that is, 

"^Tofield, C. S., Bui. 72, Bureau of Plant In- when the temperature of the water ap- 

dustry, Part II, p. 8, 1905. proaches 60 degrees Fahrenheit. 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

A Practical Book on the Breeding of Wild Fowl 
for Sport and for Profit 

With Numerous Illustrations. 

Contains chapters on the Preservation of Snipe and Woodcock. 

Many readers of the Game Breeder have bred thousands of Wild Ducks 
by following the instructions in this book. 



DUCK BREEDING IS PROFITABLE. 



PRICE, $1.50; Special Signed Edition, $2.00. 



THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, New York 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



182 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T!?5 Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER, 1916. 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the Unked States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Hcntington, Secretary. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 

REFLECTIONS ON A SHARK 
NOTE. 

We are sure our readers will be inter- 
ested in the note about sharks, written 
by the distinguished naturalist, David 
Starr Jordan, Chancellor of Leland- 
Stanford Junior University, California. 

Always we are gratified when readers 
of ability send us timely notes. We have 
long known that the triumph of the so- 
called "more game" movement was large- 
ly due to the big number of able men 
who are members of the Game Conser- 
vation Society or readers of its publica- 
tion. The quiet influence of men of real 
ability has been worth much to the cause. 



any legislative body to single out this or 
that for special taxes and to carry the 
idea to extremes ? 

One great curse of the country is ill- 
advised legislation. All the great legal 
authorities in the land are aware that 
there are far too many laws. The game 
of the country has felt the effect of 
thousands of foolish enactments and 
America is the only civilized country in 
the world where the people do not eat 
cheap game. 

We believe that a special raid on the 
makers of powder is especially ill-advised 
if we would encourage preparedness. 



TAXING GUNPOWDER. 

The Congress proposes, in a new bill, 
to place a special tax on gunpowder of 
8 per cent, on the gross reecipts. 

We fail to see why powder should be 
singled out for a special tax. We have 
always entertained the idea that it was 
a mighty good thing for a country to 
have powder manufactories as well as a 
lot of good sportsmen skilled with the 
gun. As the little man said, who "bought 
him a big bass drum": "Who can tell 
when a war will come ? and if I'm called 
on to fight for my land I want to be 
ready to play in the band. Boom ! Boom ! 
Boom !" 

But seriously, is it not a mistake for 



A CALIFORNIA OUTRAGE. 

We still have complaints from Califor- 
nia breeders. Here is a fine sample from 
an industrious lady who would like to 
produce some food on her premises with- 
out danger of arrest: 

"I am having trouble to even get a 
permit to keep my quail. I have about 
seventy-five fine, thrifty California 
Valley quail which I hatched from 
birds given me by some friends who 
have quail in their aviaries here; also 
a few eggs were given me. I have 
written Mr. Pritchard, game commis- 
sioner at Los Angeles, and he only 
wants to give me a permit to keep a 
limited number and I wish to keep my 
seventy-five." 

MARY RAHLMAN. 

We have advised the lady not to move 
from California but to stay just where 
she is; to keep all of her quail and to 
sell her birds and eggs. 

We doubt if there is a game policeman 
in California with nerve enough to lay 
hands on this lady or to arrest any game 
farmer for the crime of food producing 
provided the stock birds have been legally 
obtained. We raised a few hundred dol- 
lars quickly to defend a case not nearly 
so shocking as that of Mary Rahlman. 

We have asked the lady to telegraph 
The Game Conservation Society, of 
which she is a member, if she has any 
trouble with the game officer and we havt 
assured her that within an hour after 
she is arrested a local bank will hand her, 
with the compliments of the Society, am- 



. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



183 



pie funds to make a successful defense 
and to recover suitable damages. 

The courts are beginning to hold that 
it is not a crime to have stock birds legal- 
ly procured "in possession;" that statutes 
relating to wild game owned by the State 
do not apply to the property of individ- 
uals and that it really is not a crime to 
produce food on a farm. 



THE CALIFORNIA SITUATION. 

In a letter to the Secretary of the 
Game Conservation Society, the Califor- 
nia Game Commission has informed us 
that they would encourage game breed- 
ing. We are inclined to think, therefore, 
that the trouble must be with some un- 
derling and that the Game Commission 
should discharge him if the facts are as 
outrageous as they seem to be. 

We are fully of the opinion that some 
action should be taken at headquarters. 
An arrest of a lady for food producing 
would, we are quite sure, prove to be 
disastrous to the party represented by the 
officer complained of. We are not slow 
in letting the people of a State know 
about it when any outrage against game 
breeders is perpetrated. We do not know 
what the politics are in this case. We 
do not care. 

There are many people interested in 
game farming in California and we are 
quite sure the people of the State will 

side with them if their industry be at- not increasing in numbers as rapidly as 
tacked. the pheasants are, is that some States 

Recently we have been examining some prevent the increase by law and it is diffi- 
correspondence between some California cult to & et a11 tne stock birds required, 
game breeders. One asks another how it In States which have intelligent game 
is that he can breed and sell game birds oncers the departments are becoming of 
and eggs. We are quite sure some breed- S reat economic importance to all of the 
ers are not interfered with. We are sure people. 

there should be no favorites; that all • 

should be treated alike. An opportunity 
is presented to "see" some one when 
restrictive laws relating to wild game are 
held to prohibit a food producing indus- 
try. We believe the California Commis- 



SOMETHING REFRESHING. 

It is refreshing to observe the attitude 
of the more intelligent game officers 
throughout the country towards the new 
industry of game breeding. 

Over two-thirds of the States have en- 
"acted laws permitting game breeders to 
rear and sell game and the game is be- 
coming very abundant in many places. 

Wild turkeys, which became extinct in 
many States, rapidly have been made 
abundant on many game farms. The 
birds and eggs are advertised and bring 
excellent prices. Many do not advertise 
because they cannot fill their orders. 

North America quickly has become one 
of the biggest pheasant producing coun- 
tries in the world. We predict that in 
two or three years there will be more 
pheasants in the United States than there 
are in any other country. 

Many of our readers now own thou- 
sands of pheasants and they will be sold 
in large numbers in the New York and 
other markets next fall. 

America probably has more wild ducks 
than any country in the world. Breeders 
now rear tens of thousands of wild ducks 
and since the ratio of increase is geo- 
metrical, when it is profitable, there soon 
will be hundreds of thousands of wild 
ducks in the markets. 

Our quail and grouse are increasing 
rapidly in places where they are properly 
looked after and the only reason they are 



A BAD START IN VIRGINIA. 

Virginia has a new game law and a 
new Commissioner. We publish on an- 
other page a letter from the new officer 



to a New York poultryman who con- 

sion will not favor the arresting of game templated purchasing a farm in Virginia 

trust they will instruct for game breeding. He is told that the 



farmers and we 



their wardens to keep their hands off 

The case of Mary Rahlman 
an explanation. 



requires 



officer cannot give him any encourage- 
ment. 

We heard of another reader who was 



184 



THE GAME BREEDER 



about to sail on the Old Dominion line to 
look at some land in Virginia and who 
decided not to visit the State at present. 

We regret to see the new officer start- 
ing out badly on the old theory that it is 
criminal to produce food on the farms 
of his State. 

One of our readers is conducting a 
good sized game farm in Virginia and he 
sells annually large numbers of wild 
geese and ducks and their eggs. He has 
been in the business many years. A num- 
ber of other members of the Game Con- 
servation Society, both men and women, 
are rearing game profitably in Virginia. 
It will be interesting to observe if the 
new officer is far enough behind the 
times to attempt to make the State abso- 
lutely a prohibition State in so far as 
game farming is concerned. 

If our memory serves us one of our 
Virginia readers recovered a judgment 
that he was clearly right. We sincerely 
hope the first breeder arrested will re- 
cover ample damages. 



Virginia. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

I am forwarding the enclosed com- 
munication to you and after you have 
finished with it will you kindly return it 
to me. 

Thanking you for your information 
in this matter 

I remain very truly yours, 

F. A. W. Shaw. 

Monisunk Farm, N. Y. 

Mr. F. A. W. Shaw, Monisunk Farm,' 

New York State. 
Dear Sir: 

Yours 11th to this department, and 
yours same date to Mr. L. T. Christian, 
re breeding game in Virginia for sale. 

We beg leave to advise you that the 
laws in this State do not provide for 
breeding game in captivity by private 
firms and positively prohibit the sale of 
same. 

An effort was made at the last session 
of our General Assembly to insert a pro- 
vision in our game laws providing for 
breeding game, but. failed to pass. 

This being the situation, this depart- 



ment can offer you no encouragement 
so far as this State is concerned. 
Yours very truly, 
Dept. Game and Inland Fisheries, . 

By M. D. Hart, 

Chief Clerk. 

» 

Editor The Game Breeder: 

Your August issue speaks of a new 
duck trouble experienced by Mr. C. H. 
Shaw, of the Arden Game Farm. 

I have raised some blacks and mallards 
in Massachusetts and believe that I have 
seen ducklings affected as described by 
Mr. Shaw, although I do not known what 
the disease is. I am inclined to believe 
this disease is a result of two much sun 
and also perhaps from rearing brood 
after brood on the same ground. Prob- 
ably a change of quarters attended by 
scrupulous cleanliness of food and drink- 
ing dishes and plenty of shade would 
check the malady. 

It is certainly good to get your maga- 
zine down here on the border. There 
are plenty of blue doves in this region. 
Can you tell me their true name? 

J. H. Harwood. 

With Massachusetts National Guard, 
El Paso, Texas. 

[The doves are probably the white- winged 
dove. We are sending you a book, "Our 
Feathered Game," written by the Editor of 
The Game Breeder, which has pictures and 
descriptions of all the American pigeons and 
doves. You will have no trouble in identify- 
ing all the doves and the scaled and other 
interesting quail which you should see in the 

El Paso region.] 

• 

Quail Breeding. 

We shall publish in the October num- 
ber three well illustrated articles about 
the artificial rearing of quail in America. 
These remarkable stories are the last 
word about the hand-rearing of Ameri- 
ca's best game birds and they bring the 
subject up to date. One of the writers 
who has a novel brooder says he now 
finds quail breeding so easy "it is a joke." 

These hand-rearing experiments, taken 
in connection with the wild breeding 
methods now successfully in operation on 
many game farms conducted by readers 
of The Game Breeder, promise quickly to 
make the bob whites and the California 
quails very abundant and soon we shall 



THE GAME BREEDER 186 

record the fulfillment of our most cher- ceilings and of course anyone can have 

ished ambition — the restoration of quail a good view without interrupting them, 

on toast. Quail shooting will be fine for I shall be able to tell you all about them 

all hands in many States where this bird when I come home." 
at present is on the song bird list and [Sent by The Spratts Patent Ltd., Newark, 

where shooting is prohibited at all times. N " J; who make the foods for S ame birds 

The articles on hand-rearing will be and dogs - ] . 

followed by some finely illustrated ar- Recreation p ark for 0rder of Qwls> 
tides about some of the quail farmers _ . , 

where quail are bred wild in protected u Ref f ™g to the recent announcement 

fields, and where thousands of quail are that the 0rder of 1 ,° wls ' a well-known 

shot every season. We hope to have some organization, would soon establish a 

color illustrations for these articles. The ! ar S e recreation park for the benefit of 

rapid increase in the number of members J? members the Supreme Secretary, 

of the society will probably make this Geo DBeroth of South Bend, Ind., has 

possible. A plan for doubling our mem- klndl y furnished the following mforma- 

bership will be submitted to readers of tl0n at our re q uest : 

The Game Breeder next month in a spe- The Order of Owls is an organization 

cial letter. • founded eleven years ago. It is a social, 

• — — fraternal society and boasts that it is a 

War Birds. Bohemian society of good fellows who 

The following letter was received a believe in love, laughter and the king- 
few weeks ago by the Bird Food Spe- dom of heaven on earth. It now has ap- 
cialty Department of Spratt's Patent, proximately 300,000 members and 2,130 
Limited, London, from a British "Tom- lodges. Its lodges and members are lo- 
my" "somewhere in France" : cated in every State in this country, in 

"I will now try and tell you a little all the provinces of Canada, in the dif- 
about the bird life out here and what I ferent territorial possessions of the 
have seen and heard. The larks are United States and in the English-speak- 
quite as good as our own from a sing- ing colonies of Great Britain, including 
ing point of view, and it is simply splen- Australia, New Zealand and South 
did to hear them when we are in the Africa. The membership of the Owls is 
trenches. What is more remarkable is made up of all classes of men and the 
to hear several larks singing in the air supreme officers recently determined to 
and at the same time shells bursting all supply the membership of the order with 
round at the airmen, but it does not stop an ideal park and preserve for hunting 
the larks. The finest bit of music I and fishing as well as camping and vacat- 
have heard out here was the song of a ing out of doors. After much investiga- 
thrush. It came and sat on an iron chim- tion, a tract of four thousand acres was 
ney in front of the billet where I am selected near Gaysville, Windsor county, 
now staying and sang for quite an hour, Vermont. This tract is in the Green 
and it has been seen and heard there mountains. It is located upon and about 
several times since. It was really the Mt. Lyon. It contains a number of trout 
best thrush I have ever heard. The streams and much game, including bear, 
place around here is thick with chaf- deer, rabbits and grouse and other things, 
finches and it is nothing unusual to have The order will, within a few weeks, be- 
two or three singing at once along the gin the construction of hunting lodges 
fire trench near by, but they have not a upon this tract, and beginning with the 
good finish to their song from a chaf- ensuing spring, the actual rearing of 
finch singer's point, though I have seen pheasants and other game birds will be 
some good specimens for the show taken up and carried on upon this pre- 
bench. I have seen birds of all kinds serve, and the birds reared will be liber- 
here, but I was surprised when I found ated to stock not only the preserve but 
the house martins in the cowsheds and other territory to which the birds may 
stables ; there are dozens of nests in the migrate. 



186 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Champion 

Mississippi Sport 

at Stud, Fee $30.00 

Breed to a real bird dog with 
brains, ambition and the best of 
blood lines. 

R. H. SIDWAY 

147-153 W. Mohawk Street 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



JUk 


BOOK ON 


/ffijg^ 


DOG DISEASES 


'v^L" 


And How to Feed 


America's 

Pioneer 

Dog Remedies 


Mailed free to any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Inc. 
118 West 31st Street, New York 



rm ^l -■ 




^P^ 




BFjf \ ^CS6 




TISHEL'S 


FRANK 



The Best in 
Pointers 

Puppies, Broken Dogs 

and Brood Bitches, by 

Champion Comanche 

Frank, Fishel's Frank 

and Champion Nicholas 

R. 

Write me your wants, please. 

U. R. FISHEL 
Box 35 HOPE, IND. 



The Amateur Trainer 

By Ed. F. Haberlein 

A practical trainer of over 30 years' experience, whose 

system is np to date and stands nneqnaled. 

New Edition Just Out. Illustrated. 
A plain, practical and concise, yet thorough guide 
in the art of training, handling and the correcting 
of faults of the bird dos subservient to the gun 
afield. Written especially for the novice, but 
equally valuable to the experienced handler By 
following the instructions plainly given, every 
shooter possessed of a little common sense and 
patience can train his own dogs to perfection. 
Paper cover, $1.00; best full cloth binding and gold 
embossed, $1.50. Address 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 



Good Quail Shooting* Near New York 

I have under lease a most desirable Shooting area near New York City. 
The Quail shooting now is very good and there are some Ruffed Grouse, Rabbits, 
etc. This shooting can be made much better than it is provided more attention 
be paid to the cats and other vermin. 1 wish to secure two or three guns to 
share the expense. The ground is well known to the Editor of the Game Breeder 
and I refer to him with his permission. For further particulars, address 



DESIRABLE, 



Care 
of 



The Game Breeder, 



150 Nassau Street, 
NEW YORK. . 






THE GAME BREEDER 



187 



Land for Game Preserve and Country House 
Near New York For Sale. 

About three hundred acres on the Mianus River in Greenwich, 
Conn., may be purchased at present for one thousand dollars per 
acre. Suitable for a magnificent country house site, with sur- 
rounding forest like that of English estates. A mile of beautiful 
trout stream and a newly made lake of several acres on the place. 
Owner will not divide the tract. Its peculiar value rests in the 
combination of forest, cliffs and stream in a tract of this size so 
near to New York and to the social centers of Greenwich and 
Stamford. 

Nothing similar can be purchased because nothing similar 
remains so near to the city. It will naturally continue to in- 
crease in value as a plain investment for this reason. 

Deer and many other wild animals and birds now on the place- 

Address Advertising Department, The Game Breeder, 

150 Nassau Street, New York City. 



Game Breeders' Supplies 

WIRE-COOPS-TRAPS 

Egg Turners, Egg Boxes for Shipping, Etc. 



all Appliances for Game farms and Preserves 

We have a new Pheasant Egg Box 
especially suitable for State Game 
Departments and Game Farms which 
ship large numbers of eggs in small 
quantities. 

Write for Prices and Information. 

F. T. OAKES, 

ROOM 622, 
THE SUN BUILDING, NEW YORK 




More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 



^pootsmanS 
Handbook 

I want to send a copy of my "Sports- 
man's Handbook " and catalog to every 
one who loves the Big Outdoors. It 
is the most complete and interesting 

Sporting Goods Catalog 

I have ever written. It not only illustrates 
and describes hundreds of articles for the 
Camper, Fisherman, Hunter and Explorer, 
but tells of my experience in the Silent Places. 
There are pictures of game birds and animals, 
and advice as to the selection of duffle, pitch- 
ing a tent, caring for firearms, preparing 
skins for the taxidermist, etc., etc. 

Camping, Fishing, Hunting 

There are chapters on where to camp, Fish 
and Hunt ; what to take, what to wear, and 
many "kinks" in wildcraft. 
/ s r nd ' lh ; sbooi: free— mention No. 266 
Powhatan Robinson, President 

NewYorkSportingGoodsCo 

15 and 17 Warren St.,NewYork,U.S.A. \7 S ' 




1.88 



THE GAME BREEDER 



sufficient importance to warrant exten- 
sive fish cultural operations, but the 
longer I have been engaged in this work 
the more important it has appeared to me 
from purely economic viewpoints. In 
fact, as a servant of both state and fed- 
eral governments,, without personally 
sacrificing the aesthetic side, I have been 
forced to see and preach the economic 
side. This economic side applies just as 
truly to game fishes as to the so-called 
commercial fishes. If the busy man can 
enjoy the sport and recreative benefits 
of angling for game fishes near home, 
he can indulge his taste more frequently 
and avoid the fatigue of a long journey 
to some distant camp with attendant 
loss of time in travel and usual expense 
of such a trip. 

One does not have to travel far from 
home to find waters suitable for such 
game fishes as trout or black bass and 
in the wilds of nature. Most country 
estates have sufficient water supply to 
feed an artificial pond and with few ex- 
ceptions such water is suitable for either 
trout or bass, or possibly landlocked 
salmon. -, 

In most instances the land which may 
be most economically flowed is not par- 
ticularly valuable or productive. When 
there is no water flowing through one's 
property it often happens that an adja- 
cent stream may be tapped or at com- 
paratively small expense diverted with 
an intake so arranged that the maximum 
desired volume of water may be ob- 
tained in time of drought and regulated 
in times of freshet. It may be conveyed 
in an open ditch made to resemble a 
natural brook or if the topographic con- 
ditions prohibit this method, it may be 
piped a whole or a part of the way. 

If a natural stream is available 
which is not subject to severe freshets, 
one which has comparatively little vari- 
ation- in flow, it may be meandered so as 
to produce on a given area double or 
treble the area of the original brook. The 
contour of the land will govern as to the 
amount of development of this sort. At 
small expense a series of pools may be 
constructed to resemble the natural pools 
on a forest stream. By natural pools I 
refer to those that are usually formed 



by a fallen tree or a collection of debris 
or possibly by a few picturesque moss- 
clad boulders. 

With the waters provided, the all im- 
portant question to be decided is as to 
the kind of fish which will best thrive in 
them and produce the most food or 
game fish and preferably both in one or 
more species. 

In the selection of a species best suit- 
ed to the waters, maximum water tem- 
perature in summer" and natural food 
supply are the two most important fac- 
tors to be considered. Water tempera- 
ture has first consideration because it is 
not practical to regulate the temperature 
to any great extent. In the planning of 
trout pools the area to which a trout 
stream may be safely extended either by 
meandering or in ponds is limited by the 
volume of water supply, as it may be 
effected by evaporation,, etc. 

Some waters contain more natural 
food. than others of the same tempera- 
ture and the higher the temperature the 
-more rapid is the growth of aquatic life 
upon which fish feed as well as of the 
fish inhabiting such waters. The maxi- 
mum temperature at times of minimum 
water supply determines whether the 
waters are suitable for trout or other 
salmonidae. 

The natural conditions may often be 
improved by the introduction of a judi- 
cious selection of water plants on which 
various forms of minute aquatic animals 
live and breed, and these in turn furnish 
fish food. Suitable plants also afford 
refuge for the small fisehs against the 
big ones. 

I confess that I am an enthusiast on 
the cultivation of waters .for the produc- 
tion of suitable food and game fishes. 
At the same time I do not advise anyone 
to incur much expense in" the develop- 
ment of fisheries along the lines here 
suggested until a thorough investigation 
has been made. The proportion of dis- 
appointments and failures in the promo- 
tion of fish cultural enterprises is per- 
haps larger than in many lines of busi- 
ness, involving no more capital. 

Subscribe to The Game Breeder, $1.00 
a year. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



189 



WILD CELERY. 



By W. L. McAtee. 



VALUE AS DUCK FOOD. 

The names wild celery (Vallisneria 
spiralis) and canvasback duck have been 
closely associated in the annals of Ameri- 
can sport. - To a certain extent this asso- 
ciation is justified, since the canvasback 
obtains about one-fourth of its food from 
this plant — a greater proportion than any 
other duck. However, the assertion that 
the flavor of the canvasback is superior 
to that of any other duck and that it de- 
pends on a diet of wild celery is not 
proved, to say the least. The scaups or 
bluebills and the redhead also are very 
fond of wild celery, and are fully as 
capable of getting the delicious buds as 
the canvasback. Several other ducks get 
more Or less of this food, the writer find- 
ing that even the scoters on a Wisconsin 
lake in fall lived almost exclusively on 
it for the time. All parts of the plant 
are eaten by ducks, but the tender winter 
buds (fig. 6) and rootstocks are relished 
best. Wild celery buds can usually be ob- 
tained only by the diving ducks, such as 
the bluebills, redhead, canvasback, and 
scoters. The nondiving species, as the 
mallard, black duck, baldpate and the 
geese, get an occasional bud, but more 
often they feed upon the leaves. 

Description of Plant. 

Wild celery (fig. 4) is a wholly sub- 
merged plant with long, flexible, ribbon- 
like leaves of light translucent green and 
of practically the same width (anywhere 
from one-fourth to three-fourths of an 
inch) from root to tip. Of course the 
leaves are narrowed near the tip and may 
be somewhat serrate or wavy margined 
there. But they are never expanded and 
the venation is peculiar. A leaf held up to 
the light displays numerous straight par- 
allel fine veins running its whole length. 
There are, besides, one median and two 
lateral prominent veins connected at in- 
tervals by irregular cross veinlets. (See 
fig. 7.) Wild celery may be dis- 
tinguished from eelgrass (Zoster a mar- 



ina), which lives in brackish or salt 
water, by the fact that its leaves grow in 
bundles from the rootstocks, while those 
of eelgrass arise singly and alternate on 
opposite sides of the stem. Pipewort 
(Eriocaulon), a fresh- water plant, often 
having ribbon-like leaves', may be recog- 
nized by the reticulation of the entire 
leaf into small cells by veins of nearly 
uniform size. 

In certain stages some of the arrow- 
heads (Sagittaria) are difficult to tell 




Fig. 4. 

from wild celery, though they usually 
have the end of the leaf expanded into 
a proper leaf blade or else quite pointed, 
neither of which characteristics is to be 
found in Vallisneria. 

The flowers of wild celery, usually 
seen in July, are peculiar. The stam- 
inate flowers attached at the base of the 
plants shed pollen, which floats on the 
surface of the water and fertilizes the 
pistillate flower. The latter is attached 
to a long, slender, round stem, which 



190 



THE GAME BREEDER 



GAME BIRDS 

TOR PROPAGATING PURPOSES 

Genuine Wild Mallards, Black Duck, Green- wing and Blue- 
wing Teal, Pintails, Gadwalls, Shovellers, Wood Duck, Widgeon, 
Red- heads, Blue-bills, also a few pairs of extra choice Canvas-backs 
and Ring-bills; Canadian, Greater and Lesser Snow, Ross, Brant, 
Hutchins, Cackling and Blue Geese, supplied for propagating 
purposes. Finest quality in the country. 

Golden, Silver, Amherst, Reeves Pheasants at reasonable prices. 
1 also am booking orders for ring-neck Pheasants reared on my 
preserve for delivery in early fall. 

I also have rare land and waterfowl from all parts of the world. 
Prices quoted for the asking. 

JOHN HEYWOOD, Gardner, Mass. 

Farms for the Propagation of Wild Fowl. 



WILD DUCKS 
MUST EAT 

You can attract wild ducks and 
other game, and propagate game and 
fish more successfully, and at less 
expense, by making natural feeding 
grounds. 

I develop natural feeding grounds 
for game and fish on your preserve. 

Planting material, including Sago 
Pondweed, Wild Rice, Wild Celery, 
Wapato and many others is properly 
collected and shipped in season with 
complete planting plans and instruc- 
tions. 

Write for free booklet/' Wild Duck Foods" 

CLYDE B. TERRELL 

Specialist on Natural Game and Fish Foods 
Dept. P. OSHKOSH, WIS. 



Portage Heights Game Farms 

NORTH PORTAGE PATH 

AKRON, OHIO 

2000 Acres 



Wild Turkeys 

Ringnecked Pheasants 

and Eggs 

To successfully rear Wild Turkey 

and Pheasants use 

Germicide— #1.00 per gallon. 

Also Breeders of German Shepherd 
Police dogs. 

J. R. GAMMETER, 

AKRON, OHIO 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



11)1 



PHEASANTS 


RINGINECKS 


GOLDEN REEVES 


For Sale 


in Large or Small Quantities 




EGCS IN SEASON 


SANDANONA PHEASANTRY 


P. O. Box 101 


Mlllbrook, Dutchess Co., New York 



DUCKS WANTED 

Anyone who can furnish us some Canvasback Duck 
eggs next year will please write us quoting price. 

CHILES & COMPANY, Mt Sterling, Ky. 



PRAIRIE GROUSE WANTED 

I wish to purchase six pair of prairie grouse, also a 
ruffed grouse Will pay a good price for same. Ad- 
dress READER, care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., 
New York. 



Subscribe for The Game Breeder, only 
il a year. 



IF you desire birds for shooting or 
to place in their aviaries for rear- 
ing next year, now is the time to 
buy. Do not wait until midwinter 
and then have the prices advance on 
you like they did last year. 

We can make immediate delivery 
on Silver, Golden, Ringneck, Lady 
Amherst, Reeves, Elliott, Mongolian, 
Swinhoe, Versicolor, Impeyan, Man- 
churian Eared, Peacock, Melanotus 
and Tragopan Cabot Pheasants. We 
can also furnish either mature or young 
Wild Turkeys. Also pure Wild Mai- 
lards. Also Japanese Silkies and 
Longtails, Blue.White, Pied, Japanned 
and Specifier Peafowl, as well as nu- 
merous varieties of fancy and other 
ducks. 

Send thirty cents in stamps for 
colortgpe catalogue of pheas- 
ants and how to rear. . . . 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 



WILD TURKEYS 

FOR SALE 

These Are True Wild Turkeys 

Now is the time to order your breeders 
for next year, before they are all sold. 

Will also have Eggs for sale next Spring 
Write for Prices and Information 

JOHNSON a SUND 

BLABON, NORTH DAKOTA 



Wild Duck Foods 

SAGO POND WEED AND OTHERS 

If you wish to grow a wild duck food, 
that will grow anywhere except in salt 
water, and the very best duck food 
known, plant Sago Pond Weed, roots or 
seed. We will refer you to people who 
are growing it abundantly, and they 
will tell you how it has improved their 
shooting. Sago is what has held the 
ducks, geese and swans in Currituck for 
the past 90 years, where they have been 
shot at more than any other place in 
America. 

We also ship wild celery roots and 
seeds. Chara, Widgeon grass roots, Red 
head grass and Wild rice roots. We will 
not ship Wild rice seed. 

JASPER B. WHITE 

WATERLILY, CURRITUCK SOUND, N. C. 



192 THE GAME BREEDER 






PHEASANTS, DUCKS AND EGGS 

Deer And Other Live Game 

FOR SALE, a superb lot of Golden, Silver and Amherst pheasants just 
right for breeding this spring and summer. 

I am now booking orders for eggs of the following varieties: Mon- 
golian, Ringneck, Chinese, Golden, Silver, Amherst and Reeves. 

Wood Duck, Mallard and Gray Call Duck eggs. 

All the eggs I ship are guaranteed to be from non-related, pure 
bred, strong, healthy birds, correctly mated; all eggs are guaranteed not to 
be over three days old when they leave my farm. 

I also manufacture a full line of special foods for the successful raising 
of young pheasants and wild water fowl, also for feeding the old birds 
all the year 'round ; write for prices. 

WALLACE EVANS GAME FARM, ST. CHARLES, ILL. 

Largest and most successful breeders of pheasants, 
wild water fowl, deer, etc., in the world. 



STONY LONESOME GAME EARM 

Mallard Ducks and 
Mongolian Pheasants 

We offer for immediate delivery (limited number) of 

Mallard Ducks and Mongolian Pheasants 

and will take orders for eggs, delivery in the spring. 

ADDRESS 

129 Front Street, New York City, 

or JOHN FOSTER, West Hartland, Connecticut 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 





Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
: u?°V->^^ : Partridges and Pheasants. 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners. 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Royal Swans of Kngland. I have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES. PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have 60 acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS, RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere— it will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only <!0 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia. 




Department V. 



WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 



Spratt's Game-Rearing Adjuncts 

ARE INDISPENSABLE YET INEXPENSIVE 



Spratt's Cardiac Spratfs Bone Meal 

"GAME SPICE" EOR GAME 

Contains valuable stimulating and Is an invaluable adjunct to the soft 
appetizing properties and should be food diet. It contains valuable lime- 
added to staple food during raw and phosphates and is much cheaper than 
inclement weather, as it frequently fresh Bone, which contains at least 
wards off attacks of Gapes, Diar- 50% moisture and which of neces- 
rhoea and Cramps. sity has to be given quite fresh. 

Beware of Gapes. Prevention is better than cure. 

Spratfs Blackerite 

is the most effective yet agreeable method of completely 
eradicating this disease. 



Fine feathers make fine birds. 

Spratfs Partridge Meal 

makes both. 



Success in raising semi-wild birds can only be attained by care and ex- 
perience. Correct feeding is half the battle. We supply the right kind of 
ammunition and you will get results if you follow directions. 

Send for " Pheasant Culture," price 25c. " Poultry Culture " sent on receipt of 1 0c. 
"Dog Culture" sent on receipt of 2c stamp. 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

NEWARK, IN. J.